References of "Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA sensitive scale to assess nociceptive pain in patients with disorders of consciousness.
Chatelle, Camille ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Whyte, John et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2012), 83(12), 1233-7

OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity of the Nociception Coma Scale (NCS), the first scale developed to assess nociceptive pain in vegetative state and minimally conscious state patients, in comparing ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity of the Nociception Coma Scale (NCS), the first scale developed to assess nociceptive pain in vegetative state and minimally conscious state patients, in comparing behavioural changes in response to noxious versus non-noxious stimulation. METHODS: The NCS was administered to assess patients' responses in three conditions: (1) baseline (observation of spontaneous behaviours), (2) non-noxious/tactile stimulation (taps on the patient's shoulder), and (3) noxious stimulation (pressure on the nail bed). RESULTS: We included 64 patients (27 vegetative state and 37 minimally conscious state; age range 20-82 years; 22 traumatic brain injury; 21 in the acute stage). The NCS total scores and subscores (motor, verbal and facial) were higher for the noxious versus the non-noxious stimulation conditions. We did not observe a difference between the non-noxious and the noxious stimulation conditions for the visual subscale. We also found a NCS cut-off value of 4 differentiating the patients receiving a noxious stimulation from patients receiving a non-noxious stimulation. The exclusion of the visual subscale increased the cut-off sensitivity (from 46% to 73%; specificity of 97% and accuracy of 85%). CONCLUSION: We propose a new version of the NCS excluding the visual subscale, the NCS-R, which constitutes a highly sensitive tool to assess responses to nociceptive pain in severely brain injured patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMRI preclinical detection and asymptomatic course of a progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) under natalizumab therapy.
Phan-Ba, Rémy ULg; LOMMERS, Emilie ULg; TSHIBANDA, Luaba ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2012), 83

Early detection of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in the setting of natalizumab therapy currently is performed by rapid evaluation of new symptoms occurring in treated patients. The role ... [more ▼]

Early detection of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML) in the setting of natalizumab therapy currently is performed by rapid evaluation of new symptoms occurring in treated patients. The role of MR scanning has not been investigated but holds promise since MR detection is highly sensitive for PML lesions. The authors report a case of presymptomatic PML of the posterior fossa detected by MR scans. Immediate suspension of natalizumab and plasma exchanges resulted in a rapid decline of natalizumab serum concentration. Intravenous steroids started together with plasma exchanges followed by an oral tapering course were used to minimise the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. No symptoms (beyond mild headache) developed, and the repeat PCR for JC Virus (JCV) DNA detection performed 10 weeks later was negative. This case suggests that: (1) periodic brain MR scans may detect signs of presymptomatic PML in MS patients treated with natalizumab, (2) corticosteroid management of inflammatory reaction may contribute to optimal control of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome routinely seen with natalizumab-associated PML and (3) early radiological detection of PML can have an excellent outcome even in a clinically critical region and despite prior immunosuppressant exposure. The potential benefit of regular MR scanning just using the T2/FLAIR modalities could be further investigated in order to detect early natalizumab-associated PML, leading to benign outcomes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurological picture. Extreme unilateral widening of Virchow-Robin spaces
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg; Collignon, Laurent

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2009), 80(1), 64-65

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of visual pursuit in post-comatose states: use a mirror
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(2),

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLocked-in: don't judge a book by its cover.
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Bernheim, J. L.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(1), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA twitch of consciousness: defining the boundaries of vegetative and minimally conscious states.
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(7), 741-2

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring the effect of amantadine in chronic anoxic minimally conscious state.
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(2), 225-7

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Comparison of Unawareness in Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, Daniela; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2008), 79(2), 176-9

BACKGROUND: Loss of insight is a core diagnostic feature of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and anosognosia is frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AIM: To compare unawareness (anosognosia) for ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Loss of insight is a core diagnostic feature of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and anosognosia is frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AIM: To compare unawareness (anosognosia) for different symptoms, measured with a discrepancy score between patient's and caregiver's assessment, in AD and FTD. METHOD: In a prospective, multi-centre study, 123 patients with probable AD, selected according to the NINCDS-ADRDA procedure, were matched for age, sex, education, disease duration and dementia severity to patients with FTD (n = 41), selected according to international consensus criteria. A research complaint questionnaire was used to obtained patient's and caregiver's assessment concerning neuropsychological and behavioural symptoms. Data were compared in each group and between groups. Unawareness (measured by discrepancy scores) was compared between patients with AD and FTD. RESULTS: The caregivers generally assessed symptoms more severely than did patients, but both patient groups reported changes in affect (depressive mood or irritability) as their caregivers did. Unawareness was greater in patients with FTD than in patients with AD for language and executive difficulties, and for changes in behaviour and daily activities. CONCLUSION: The main finding is that unawareness was observed in both patients with FTD and patients with AD for most clinical domains. However, qualitative and quantitative differences showed that lack of awareness was greater in patients with FTD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailConscious states, wakefulness, sleep, coma, the vegetative state, and hypnosis
Laureys, Steven ULg

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2004, June), 75(6), 945-946

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSubthalamic nucleus stimulation induces deficits in decoding emotional facial expression in Parkinson's disease
Dujardin, Kathy; Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Defebvre, L et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2004), 75

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroimaging tools to rate regional atrophy, subcortical cerebrovascular disease, and regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism: consensus paper of the EADC
Frisoni, G. B.; Scheltens, P. H.; Galluzzi, S. et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2003), 74(10), 1371-1381

Neuroimaging is a mainstay in the differential diagnosis of patients with cognitive impairment. The often equivocal clinical pictures, the prognostic uncertainty of the earliest stages of mild cognitive ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging is a mainstay in the differential diagnosis of patients with cognitive impairment. The often equivocal clinical pictures, the prognostic uncertainty of the earliest stages of mild cognitive impairment, and the subtle brain changes mean that neuroimaging techniques are of potentially great incremental diagnostic value. A number of methods, ranging from very simple subjective visual ratings to highly sophisticated computerised tools, have been developed, which allow rating of structural and functional brain changes. The choice of the method is not obvious, and current guidelines provide no indications on which tools should be preferred. In this paper, we give indications for tools with demonstrated accuracy for detecting regional atrophy, cerebrovascular disease, and regional brain function, and discuss these according to increasing technological complexity, ranging from those with high feasibility that can be used at the patient's bedside to highly technological ones that require trained personnel and specific hardware and software. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFavourable outcome of a brain trauma patient despite bilateral loss of cortical somatosensory evoked potential during thiopental sedation
Robe, Pierre; Dubuisson, Annie ULg; Bartsch, Sébastien et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2003), 74(8), 1157-1158

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReduced excitability of the motor cortex in untreated patients with de novo idiopathic “grand mal” seizures
Delvaux, Valérie ULg; Alagona, Giovanna; GERARD, Pascale ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2001), 71(6), 772-776

OBJECTIVES: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate motor cortex excitability, intracortical excitatory, and inhibitory pathways in 18 patients having experienced a first "grand ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate motor cortex excitability, intracortical excitatory, and inhibitory pathways in 18 patients having experienced a first "grand mal" seizure within 48 hours of the electrophysiological test. All had normal brain MRI, and were free of any treatment, drug, or alcohol misuse. Results were compared with those of 35 age matched normal volunteers. METHODS: The following parameters of responses to TMS were measured: motor thresholds at rest and with voluntary contraction, amplitudes of responses, cortical silent periods, and responses to paired pulse stimulation with interstimulus intervals of 1 to 20 ms. RESULTS: In patients, there were significantly increased motor thresholds with normal amplitudes of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), suggesting decreased cortical excitability. Cortical silent periods were not significantly different from those of normal subjects. Paired TMS with short interstimulus intervals (1-5 ms) induced normal inhibition of test MEPs, suggesting preserved function of GABAergic intracortical inhibitory interneurons. On the contrary, the subsequent period of MEP facilitation found in normal subjects (ISIs of 6-20 ms) was markedly reduced in patients. This suggests the existence of abnormally prolonged intracortical inhibition or deficient intracortical excitation. In nine patients retested 2 to 4 weeks after the initial seizure, these abnormalities persisted, although to a lesser extent. CONCLUSION: The present findings together with abnormally high motor thresholds could represent protective mechanisms against the spread or recurrence of seizures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIpsilateral motor responses to focal transcranial magnetic stimulation in normal and stroke patients.
ALAGONA G.; DELVAUX, Valérie ULg; GERARD, Pascale ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (2000), Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerebral metabolism during vegetative state and after recovery to consciousness
Laureys, Steven ULg; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (1999), 67(1), 121-122

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntraoperative Localisation of the Primary Motor Cortex Using Single Electrical Stimuli
Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg; Born, J. D.; Hans, Pol ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (1996), 60(4), 442-4

A new method of intraoperative localisation of the primary motor cortex is described, based on the application of single anodal electric pulses to the brain surface. Patients were anaesthetised with ... [more ▼]

A new method of intraoperative localisation of the primary motor cortex is described, based on the application of single anodal electric pulses to the brain surface. Patients were anaesthetised with propofol infusion, and neuromuscular blockade was temporarily alleviated to allow recording of surface EMG responses (CMAPs) to the stimuli. Primary motor areas could be localised in 18/19 patients studied. In the other patient, no responses were elicited, as the operative field was posterior to the motor cortex. When compared with MEPs elicited in awake patients by magnetic stimuli, responses to intraoperative anodal stimulation were of small amplitude (usually less than 10% of MEPs) and their latency was some 1 to 2 ms longer. One month after the operation, only 1/19 patients was left with a slight muscle weakness, although seven showed preoperative motor deficit. The procedure proved easy and fast, needing no preliminary surgery or time consuming preparation. It did not induce any detectable side effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMyositis During Borrelia Burgdorferi Infection (Lyme Disease)
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Sianard-Gainko, J.; Carpentier, M. et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (1989), 52(8), 1002-5

During the second stage of an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a young woman developed a myopathic syndrome characterised by severe muscular pains, incapacitating weakness of the proximal limb and ... [more ▼]

During the second stage of an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a young woman developed a myopathic syndrome characterised by severe muscular pains, incapacitating weakness of the proximal limb and the neck, as well as the bulbar muscles and elevated serum CK levels. Muscle biopsy revealed a non-inflammatory necrotising myopathy. B. burgdorferi infection was confirmed by a considerable rise of specific IgG antibodies. A course of high dose steroids alleviated the myalgias, but paresis began to improve only after treatment with antibiotics. Our observations confirm that B burgdorferi can cause, through an undertermined mechanism, a necrotising myopathy, in addition to the wide spectrum of already known neurological complications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPercutaneous electrical stimulation of lumbosacral roots in man.
MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULg; Rothwell, J. C.; Thompson, P. D. et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (1988), 51(2), 174-81

High voltage percutaneous electrical stimulation over the lumbosacral spinal column was used to assess conduction in the cauda equina of 13 normal subjects. Electromyographic activity elicited by such ... [more ▼]

High voltage percutaneous electrical stimulation over the lumbosacral spinal column was used to assess conduction in the cauda equina of 13 normal subjects. Electromyographic activity elicited by such stimulation was recorded from various muscles of the lower limbs. The stimulating cathode was placed over the spinous process of each vertebral body and the anode kept on the iliac crest contralateral to the studied limb. Shifting the cathode in a rostro-caudal direction shortened the response latency in quadriceps, tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum brevis muscles. At moderate intensities (60% maximum), this occurred abruptly when the cathode was placed at levels corresponding to the exit sites from the spinal canal of the roots innervating these muscles. At these intensities, the size of the response in each muscle was largest when the cathode was placed over the conus medullaris or at or below the exit of the motor roots from the spine. Latencies were always equal to or shorter than those obtained with F-wave measurements, suggesting that peripheral motor axons, rather than intraspinal structures were activated by the stimulus. Collision experiments demonstrated that activation occurred at two sites: near the spinal cord and at the root exit site in the vertebral foramina. Recordings made from soleus indicated that larger diameter proprioceptive afferent fibres also could be activated. This technique might have useful clinical applications in the study of both proximal and distal lesions of the cauda equina and provide a non-invasive method of localising such lesions electrophysiologically. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)