References of "Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhysiotherapy Intervention for Joint Hypermobility in Three Cases with Heritable Connective Tissue Disorders
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain (2010), 18(3), 254-60

Introduction: In Joint Hypermobility Syndromes, chronic pain is the most disabling symptom. Its origin can be multiple (i.e. subluxations, sprains, pathologies of tendons, ligaments, peripheral nerves ... [more ▼]

Introduction: In Joint Hypermobility Syndromes, chronic pain is the most disabling symptom. Its origin can be multiple (i.e. subluxations, sprains, pathologies of tendons, ligaments, peripheral nerves, multiple operations). The goal of this article was intended to discuss appropriate physiotherapy in hyperlax patients. Patients and Method: The recovery process was analyzed in three cases (Marfan Syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta). Hypermobility was assessed using the Brighton scale, pain using the Visual Analogue Scale and quality of life using the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36. Bone density was evaluated by QDR X-ray absorptiometry. We emphasized that it was important to avoid stretching and to train the patient within a controlled range of motion. Submaximal eccentric exercises within a safe range of motion were incorporated to increase the active control of the joint positioning. Thus, in one patient, isokinetic rehabilitation was successfully undertaken. Each treatment had to be adapted to the individual patient and had to include specific home exercises. Conclusion: In each case, physiotherapy gave good results in relation to pain, quality of life and stability of rehabilitated joints. Safety must be assured and specific evaluations such osteodensitometry, cardiac explorations and interventions of bracing, proprioceptive and functional strengthening can be very helpful. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 180 (47 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular Responses to Static Assessments of Trunk Muscles
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Grosdent, Stéphanie ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

in Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain (2009), 17(4), 378-389

Objectives: To investigate the cardiovascular responses to standard static assessments of strength and endurance of trunk extensor muscles. Methods: Trunk extensor performances of ten healthy men, 48.2±5 ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To investigate the cardiovascular responses to standard static assessments of strength and endurance of trunk extensor muscles. Methods: Trunk extensor performances of ten healthy men, 48.2±5.6 years, and 10 healthy women, 49±5.7 years, were assessed by means of a maximum static strength test [consisting in maximal voluntary contractions [MVC] performed with a specific dynamometer], and two static endurance tests [the Sorensen test, and a 50 percent MVC test]. Heart rate [HR], auscultatory systolic [SBP], and diastolic blood pressure [DBP] were recorded throughout the tests. Results: The MVCs induced significant increases of HR and SBP [mean peak values averaging 90 [female] to 95 [male] beats per minute and 133 [female] to 141 [male] mmHg]. The HR, SBP, and DBP values increased significantly across time throughout both endurance static tests. At the end of these tests, mean HR, SBP, and DBP reached 114 to 122 beats per minute, 172 to 185 mmHg, and 112 to 120 mmHg. Genders differed significantly with regard to holding times [longer in females], but a gender effect was only found on SBP [higher in males]. Heart rate and SBP increases were significantly higher in males than in female subjects. Conclusions: The strength test seems less demanding than expected, though our results need to be confirmed. Standard static endurance tests yield sizeable functional stress on the cardiovascular system. Our study emphasizes the need to exclude subjects with cardiac trouble from such efforts and suggests the relevance of monitoring cardiovascular parameters if tests are performed until exhaustion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReproducibility and Suitability of Clinical Assessments of Trunk Flexor and Extensor Muscles
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Sac, Delphine; Serre, Laurent et al

in Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain (2008), 16

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBenefits of a physical training program after back school for chronic low back pain patients
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg; Tomasella, Marco ULg et al

in Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain (2006), 14(2), 21-31

Objectives: Compare a treatment combining a back school program and physical training with a treatment consisting of only aback school program undertaken by chronic low back pain [CLBP] patients. Methods ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Compare a treatment combining a back school program and physical training with a treatment consisting of only aback school program undertaken by chronic low back pain [CLBP] patients. Methods: Forty CLBP patients [21 females] completed an educational back school program. Once ended, 17 subjects [the Education-Physical Group [EPG]] started physical training sessions attended twice a week [90 minutes] for six weeks. The others constituted the Education Group [EG]. All subjects performed three tests: the pain visual analog scale, the Dallas questionnaire assessing quality of life, and an ergonomic test at the beginning [Day [D] 1], at the end [D21] of the back school program, and three months later [D120]. The EPG also carried out physical tests at the start and at the end of the physical training. Results: At D21, no significant difference in pain and Dallas scores appeared, although patients of both groups performed the ergonomic test significantly better. At D120, the decrease of pain intensity and the quality of life improvement were significant in both groups [P < 0.05]. The extent of the pain intensity decrease was significantly higher in the EPG compared to the EG. The EPG displayed improvements in most physical assessments [P < 0.05]. Only the increase of knee extensors strength correlated significantly with the improvements of quality of life and ergonomic function scores. Conclusions: This study supports positive effects of a back school program for CLBP patients. Additional physical training sessions lead to lower pain intensity, greater improvement of quality of life than back school sessions only, as well as improvement of muscle performances. The increase of the knee extensors strength might have helped to decrease the pain and improve the quality of life. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (21 ULg)