References of "Journal of Microbiological Methods"
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See detailUse of red autofluorescence for monitoring prodiginine biosynthesis
Tenconi, Elodie ULg; Guichard, Paul; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2013), 93

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See detailAn efficient DNA isolation protocol for filamentous cyanobacteria of the genus Arthrospira
Morin, Nicolas ULg; Vallaeys, Tatiana; Hendrickx, Larissa et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2010), 80

Thanks to their photosynthetic and nutritive properties, cyanobacteria of the Arthrospira genus are of interest as food supplements, as efficient oxygen producing life support system organisms for manned ... [more ▼]

Thanks to their photosynthetic and nutritive properties, cyanobacteria of the Arthrospira genus are of interest as food supplements, as efficient oxygen producing life support system organisms for manned space flight, and for the production of biofuels. Despite these potential valuable applications, full genome sequences and genetic information in general on Arthrospira remain scarce. This is mainly due to the difficulty to extract sufficient high molecular weight nucleic acids from these filamentous cyanobacteria. In this article, an efficient and reproducible DNA extraction procedure for cyanobacteria of the genus Arthrospira was developed. The method is based on the combination of a soft mechanical lysis with enzymatic disruption of the cell wall. The comparison with other extraction protocols clearly indicates that this optimised method allows the recovery of a larger amount of DNA. Furthermore, the extracted DNA presents a high molecular weight, a reduced degradation and an excellent overall quality. It can be directly used for molecular biology purposes such as PCR, and clone library construction. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of molecular techniques in elucidating the action mechanisms of fungal biocontrol agents
Massart, Sébastien ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2007), 69

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See detailAdvances in immunoproteomics for serological characterization of microbial antigens
Falisse-Poirier, Nandini; Ruelle, Virginie ULg; Elmoualij, Benaïssa ULg et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2006), 67(3), 593-596

We propose a multi-dimensional strategy, associating immunodetection to a protein fractionating two-dimensional liquid chromatography tool, for serological characterization of microbial antigens. The ... [more ▼]

We propose a multi-dimensional strategy, associating immunodetection to a protein fractionating two-dimensional liquid chromatography tool, for serological characterization of microbial antigens. The originality of such immunoproteomic approaches resides in their application in large-scale studies for rapid serotyping of micro-organisms, evaluation of immunomes and could be proposed in the development and monitoring of vaccines. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailTesting of primers for the study of cyanobacterial molecular diversity by DGGE
Boutte, C.; Grubisic, Stana ULg; Balthasart, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2006), 65(3), 542-550

Denaturing Gradient Gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is a PCR-based technique which is widely used in the study of microbial communities. Here, the use of the three specific 16S rRNA cyanobacterial specific ... [more ▼]

Denaturing Gradient Gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is a PCR-based technique which is widely used in the study of microbial communities. Here, the use of the three specific 16S rRNA cyanobacterial specific primers CYA359F, CYA781R(a) and CYA781R(b) on the assessment of the molecular diversity of cyanobacterial communities is examined. Assignments of the reverse primers CYA781R(a) and CYA781R(b) with cyanobacterial strain sequences showed that the former preferentially targets filamentous cyanobacteria whereas the latter targets unicellular cyanobacteria. The influence of the GC clamp position on the forward Or on reverse primer and the use of the two reverse primers separately or in equimolar mixture were investigated. Three environmental samples were subjected to amplification with 6 combinations of primers. The 6 banding patterns as well as the sequences of the bands extracted were analysed and compared. In addition, to assess the effect of the position of the GC clamp, the melting profiles of the sequences of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae PMC9707 and Synechococcus sp. MH305 were determined, with the GC clamp in the 3' or 5' position. Results showed that the use of two separate amplifications allowed a more complete study of the molecular diversity of the cyanobacterial community investigated. Furthermore, similar richness and identical phylogenctic assignments of extracted bands were obtained irrespective of the positioning of the GC clamp. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment Of Real-Time Pcr Using Minor Groove Binding Probe To Monitor The Biological Control Agent Candida Oleophila (Strain O)
Massart, Sébastien ULg; De Clercq, Deborah; Dickburt, Catherine et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2005), 60(1), 73-82

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See detailA PCR method for detection of bifidobacteria in raw milk and raw milk cheese: comparison with culture-based methods
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Bechoux, Nathalie ULg; China, Bernard et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2005), 61(1), 55-67

Bifidobacteria are well known for their beneficial effects on health and are used as probiotics in food and pharmaceutical products. As they form one of the most important groups in both human and animal ... [more ▼]

Bifidobacteria are well known for their beneficial effects on health and are used as probiotics in food and pharmaceutical products. As they form one of the most important groups in both human and animal feces, their use as fecal indicator organisms in raw milk products has recently been proposed. Bifidobacteria species isolated in humans are different from those isolated in animals. It should therefore be possible to determine contamination origin (human or animal). A method of detecting the Bifidobacterium genus was developed by PCR targeting the hsp60 gene. The genus Bifidobacterium was identified by PCR amplification of a 217-bp hsp60 gene fragment. The degenerated primer pair specific to the Bifidobacterium genus used was tested for it specificity on 127 strains. Sensitivity was measured on artificially contaminated samples. Food can however be a difficult matrix for PCR testing since it contains PCR inhibitors. So an internal PCR control was used. An artificially created DNA fragment of 315 bp was constructed. The PCR detection method was tested on raw milk and cheese samples and compared with three culture-based methods, which comprised enrichment and isolation steps. The enrichment step used Brain Heart Infusion medium with propionic acid, iron citrate, yeast extract, supplemented with mupirocin (BHMup) or not (BH) and the isolation step used Columbia blood agar medium, supplemented with mupirocin (CMup) or not (C). The method using mupirocin at both enrichment and isolation steps and the PCR method performed from the culture in BHMup enrichment medium were shown to be the most efficient. No significant difference was observed in raw milk samples between PCR from BHMup and the culture-based method BHMup/CMup, while a significant difference was noticed between the same methods in raw milk cheese samples, which would favor using PCR. The results suggested that PCR on the hsp60 gene was convenient for a rapid detection of bifidobacteria in raw milk and raw milk cheese samples and that bifidobacteria always present throughout raw milk cheese production could be efficiently used as fecal indicators. [less ▲]

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See detailNew disruption cassettes for rapid gene disruption and marker rescue in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica
Fickers, Patrick ULg; Le Dall, M. T.; Gaillardin, C. et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2003), 55(3), 727-737

Yarrowia lipolytica is one of the most extensively studied nonconventional yeasts. Unfortunately, few methods for gene disruption have been reported for this yeast, and all of them are time-consuming and ... [more ▼]

Yarrowia lipolytica is one of the most extensively studied nonconventional yeasts. Unfortunately, few methods for gene disruption have been reported for this yeast, and all of them are time-consuming and laborious. The functional analysis of unknown genes requires powerful disruption methods. Here, we describe such a new method for rapid gene disruption in Y lipolytica. This knockout system combines SEP method and the Cre-lox recombination system, facilitating efficient marker rescue. Versatility was increased by using both auxotrophic markers like ylURA3 and ylLEU2, as well as the antibiotic resistance marker hph. The hph marker, which confers resistance to hygromycin-B, allows gene disruption in a strain lacking any conventional auxothrophic marker. The disruption cassette was shown to integrate at the correct locus at an average frequency of 45%. Upon expression of Cre recombinase, the marker was excised at a frequency of 98%, by recombination between the two lox sites. This new method for gene disruption is an ideal tool for the functional analysis of gene families, or for creating large-scale mutant collections in general. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of electrical properties on the evaluation of the surface hydrophobicity of Bacillus subtilis
Ahimou, F.; Paquot, Michel ULg; Jacques, Philippe ULg et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2001), 45(2), 119-126

The surface hydrophobicity of nine Bacillus subtilis strains in different states (spores, vegetative cells, and dead cells) was assessed by water contact angle measurements, hydrophobic interaction ... [more ▼]

The surface hydrophobicity of nine Bacillus subtilis strains in different states (spores, vegetative cells, and dead cells) was assessed by water contact angle measurements, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon (BATH). Electrokinetic properties of B, subtilis strains were characterized by zeta potential measurements and found to differ appreciably according to the strain, Correlations between HIC data, BATH data and zeta potential showed that HIC and RATH are influenced by electrostatic interactions. Water contact angle measurements thus provide a better estimate of cell surface hydrophobicity. The water contact angle of B. subtilis varied according to the strain and the state, the spores tending to be more hydrophobic than vegetative cells. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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