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See detailThe dermatophyte species Arthroderma benhamiae: intraspecies variability and mating behaviour
Symoens, F; Jousson, O; Packeu, A et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2013), 62

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See detailDirect identification of bacteria from BacT/ALERT anaerobic positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF MS: MALDI Sepsityper kit versus an in-house saponin method for bacterial extraction.
MEEX, Cécile ULg; Neuville, Florence; DESCY, Julie ULg et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2012), 61

In cases of bacteraemia, a rapid species identification of the causal agent directly from positive blood culture broths could assist clinicians in the timely targeting of empirical antimicrobial therapy ... [more ▼]

In cases of bacteraemia, a rapid species identification of the causal agent directly from positive blood culture broths could assist clinicians in the timely targeting of empirical antimicrobial therapy. For this purpose, we evaluated the direct identification of micro-organisms from BacT/ALERT (bioMérieux) anaerobic positive blood cultures without charcoal using the Microflex matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight MS (Bruker), after bacterial extraction by using two different methods: the MALDI Sepsityper kit (Bruker) and an in-house saponin lysis method. Bruker's recommended criteria for identification were expanded in this study, with acceptance of the species identification when the first three results with the best matches with the MALDI Biotyper database were identical, whatever the scores were. In total, 107 monobacterial cultures and six polymicrobial cultures from 77 different patients were included in this study. Among monomicrobial cultures, we identified up to the species level 67 and 66 % of bacteria with the MALDI Sepsityper kit and the saponin method, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two extraction methods. The direct species identification was particularly inconclusive for Gram-positive bacteria, as only 58 and 52 % of them were identified to the species level with the MALDI Sepsityper kit and the saponin method, respectively. Results for Gram-negative bacilli were better, with 82.5 and 90 % of correct identification to the species level with the MALDI Sepsityper kit and the saponin method, respectively. No misidentifications were given by the direct procedures when compared with identifications provided by the conventional method. Concerning the six polymicrobial blood cultures, whatever the extraction method used, a correct direct identification was only provided for one of the isolated bacteria on solid medium in all cases. The analysis of the time-to-result demonstrated a reduction in the turnaround time for identification ranging from 1 h 06 min to 24 h 44 min, when performing the blood culture direct identification in comparison with the conventional method, whatever the extraction method. [less ▲]

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See detailSecreted subtilisins of Microsporum canis are involved in adherence of arthroconidia to feline corneocytes.
Baldo, Aline ULg; Tabart, Jeremy; Vermout, Sandy et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2008), 57(Pt 9), 1152-1156

Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus that causes a superficial cutaneous infection called dermatophytosis, mainly in cats and humans. The mechanisms involved in adherence of M. canis to epidermis have ... [more ▼]

Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus that causes a superficial cutaneous infection called dermatophytosis, mainly in cats and humans. The mechanisms involved in adherence of M. canis to epidermis have never been investigated. Here, a model was developed to study the adherence of M. canis to feline corneocytes through the use of a reconstructed interfollicular feline epidermis (RFE). In this model, adherence of arthroconidia to RFE was found to be time-dependent, starting at 2 h post-inoculation and still increasing at 6 h. Chymostatin, a serine protease inhibitor, inhibited M. canis adherence to RFE by 53%. Moreover, two mAbs against the keratinolytic protease subtilisin 3 (Sub3) inhibited M. canis adherence to RFE by 23%, suggesting that subtilisins, and Sub3 in particular, are involved in the adherence process. [less ▲]

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See detailReconstructed interfollicular feline epidermis as a model for Microsporum canis dermatophytosis
Tabart, Jérémy; Baldo, Aline ULg; Vermout, Sandy et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (2007), 56(7), 971-975

Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus that causes a superficial cutaneous infection called dermatophytosis. The complexity of mechanisms involved in dermatophytic infections makes relevant in vivo ... [more ▼]

Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus that causes a superficial cutaneous infection called dermatophytosis. The complexity of mechanisms involved in dermatophytic infections makes relevant in vivo studies particularly difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to develop a new in vitro model of M. canis dermatophytosis using feline fetal keratinocytes in reconstructed interfollicular epidermis, and to investigate its relevance in studying the host-pathogen relationship. Histological analysis of reconstructed interfollicular feline epidermis (RFE) revealed a fully differentiated epidermis. A proliferation assay showed replicating cells only in the basal layer, indicating that RFE is a well-stratified living tissue, leading to the formation of a horny layer. Histopathological analysis of RFE infected by M. canis arthroconidia revealed that the fungus invades the stratum corneum and produces SUB3, a keratinase implicated in the infectious process. In view of these results, an M. canis dermatophytosis model on RFE seems to be a useful tool to investigate mechanisms involved in natural M. canis feline infections. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific DNA probes to detect Escherichia coli strains producing cytotoxic necrotising factor type 1 or type 2
Oswald, E.; Pohl, P.; Jacquemin, E. et al

in Journal of Medical Microbiology (1994), 40

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