References of "Journal of Hepatology"
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See detailLiver transplantation for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma in normal livers.
Mergental, Hynek; Adam, Rene; Ericzon, Bo-Goran et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2012), 57(2), 297-305

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of liver transplantation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in livers without fibrosis/cirrhosis (NC-HCC) is unclear. We aimed to determine selection criteria for ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The role of liver transplantation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in livers without fibrosis/cirrhosis (NC-HCC) is unclear. We aimed to determine selection criteria for liver transplantation in patients with NC-HCC. METHODS: Using the European Liver Transplant Registry, we identified 105 patients who underwent liver transplantation for unresectable NC-HCC. Detailed information about patient, tumor characteristics, and survival was obtained from the transplant centers. Variables associated with survival were identified using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. RESULTS: Liver transplantation was primary treatment in 62 patients and rescue therapy for intrahepatic recurrences after liver resection in 43. Median number of tumors was 3 (range 1-7) and median tumor size 8cm (range 0.5-30). One- and 5-year overall and tumor-free survival rates were 84% and 49% and 76% and 43%, respectively. Macrovascular invasion (HR 2.55, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.86), lymph node involvement (HR 2.60, 95% CI 1.28 to 5.28), and time interval between liver resection and transplantation <12months (HR 2.12, 95% CI 0.96 to 4.67) were independently associated with survival. Five-year survival in patients without macrovascular invasion or lymph node involvement was 59% (95% CI 47-70%). Tumor size was not associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest reported series of patients transplanted for NC-HCC. Selection of patients without macrovascular invasion or lymph node involvement, or patients 12months after previous liver resection, can result in 5-year survival rates of 59%. In contrast to HCC in cirrhosis, tumor size is not a predictor of post-transplant survival in NC-HCC. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of CD8+ T-cell response in acute and resolved hepatitis A virus infection.
Schulte, I.; Hitziger, T.; Giugliano, S. et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2011), 54(2), 201-208

Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: In contrast to the infection with other hepatotropic viruses, hepatitis A virus (HAV) always causes acute self-limited hepatitis, although the role for virus-specific CD8 T ... [more ▼]

Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: In contrast to the infection with other hepatotropic viruses, hepatitis A virus (HAV) always causes acute self-limited hepatitis, although the role for virus-specific CD8 T cells in viral containment is unclear. Herein, we analyzed the T cell response in patients with acute hepatitis by utilizing a set of overlapping peptides and predicted HLA-A2 binders from the polyprotein. METHODS: A set of 11 predicted peptides from the HAV polyprotein, identified as potential binders, were synthesized. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients were tested for IFNγ secretion after stimulation with these peptides and ex vivo with HLA-A2 tetramers. Phenotyping was carried out by staining with the activation marker CD38 and the memory marker CD127. RESULTS: Eight out of 11 predicted HLA-A2 binders showed a high binding affinity and five of them were recognized by CD8+ T cells from patients with hepatitis A. There were significant differences in the magnitude of the responses to these five peptides. One was reproducibly immunodominant and the only one detectable ex vivo by tetramer staining of CD8+ T cells. These cells have an activated phenotype (CD38hi CD127lo) during acute infection. Three additional epitopes were identified in HLA-A2 negative patients, most likely representing epitopes restricted by other HLA-class I-alleles (HLA-A11, B35, B40). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with acute hepatitis A have a strong multi-specific T cell response detected by ICS. With the tetramer carrying the dominant HLA-A2 epitope, HAV-specific and activated CD8+ T cells could be detected ex vivo. This first description of the HAV specific CTL-epitopes will allow future studies on strength, breadth, and kinetics of the T-cell response in hepatitis A. [less ▲]

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See detailBloodless cadaveric liver transplantation: Experience with Jehovah's witness recipients
Detry, Olivier ULg; De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Coimbra Marques, Carla ULg et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2007), 46(Suppl. 1), 67

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See detailComplications in living liver donor according to Clavien's classification: An European experience
De Roover, Arnaud ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg; Meurisse, Nicolas ULg et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2007), 46(Suppl. 1), 66

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See detailOutcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma listed for liver transplantation within the eurotransplant allocation system
Adler, M.; Lerut, J.; Starkel, P. et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2006), 44(Suppl. 2), 14

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See detailReduction of relapse rates by 18-month treatment in chronic hepatitis C. A Benelux randomized trial in 300 patients.
Brouwer, Johannes T; Nevens, Frederik; Bekkering, Frank C et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2004), 40(4), 689-695

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon can be ineffective due to relapse. We aimed to reduce the 40% relapse rate of 6 months interferon-ribavirin combination therapy by ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon can be ineffective due to relapse. We aimed to reduce the 40% relapse rate of 6 months interferon-ribavirin combination therapy by prolonging treatment to 18 months. METHODS: Three hundred patients with treatment-naive hepatitis C, were randomized to 18 months combination therapy with interferon (3MU tiw) and ribavirin (1000-1200 mg/day), 18 months interferon combined with placebo, or 6 months combination therapy with interferon and ribavirin, in a double blinded manner. All 295 patients who received at least one dose of treatment were included in the intention to treat analysis. RESULTS: At the end of treatment, HCV RNA was undetectable in 55 and 49% of those on 6 and 18 months combination therapy, respectively, versus 26% of those on monotherapy (P<0.001). The relapse rate was 38% for 6 months combination therapy, 38% for 18 months monotherapy, and only 13% for 18 months combination treatment (P=0.002). The sustained response rates were 34% for 6 months combination therapy, 16% for 18 months monotherapy and 43% for 18 months combination therapy (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Reduction of relapse rates to 15% or less is feasible by prolongation of interferon-ribavirin treatment to 18 months. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors inftuencing ribavirin-induced hemolysis
Van Vlierberghe, H.; Delanghe, J. R.; De Vos, M. et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2001), 34

BackgroundlAims: One of the major side eft'ects of the combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C is ribavirininduced hemolytic anemia. Little is known about variables inftuencing tbis anemia. Our study ... [more ▼]

BackgroundlAims: One of the major side eft'ects of the combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C is ribavirininduced hemolytic anemia. Little is known about variables inftuencing tbis anemia. Our study tried to search for these variables in a large group of patients with hepatitis C treated with the combination therapy. Methods: Two hundred and forty-four patients chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus were treated either with induction treatment (daily dose ofinterferon) or with a standard treatment (interferon thrice weekly). Both groups received 1000-1200 mg of ribavirin from week 4 until the end of the treatment. The drop in hemoglobin level was defined as the dift'erence between the pretreatment hemoglobin level and the hemoglobin level at week 8. Seventeen variables which could possibly influencê'this drop in hemoglobin level were examined. Results: After multivariate analysis, the drop in hemoglobin level was only significant influenced by pretreatment platelet level, treatment and haptoglobin phenotype. The ribavirin dose did not influence the drop in hemoglobin level or the early virological response. Conclusions: Ribavirin-induced hemolysis is inftuenced by the pretreatment platelet level, the administered amount of a-interferon and the haptoglobin phenotype. A careful search for the minimal dose of ribavirin needed in combination treatment is necessary. [less ▲]

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