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See detailSafety and patients' satisfaction of transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation (tSNS) with the Cefaly® device in headache treatment: a survey of 2,313 headache sufferers in the general population.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg; D'Elia, Tullia Sasso et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2013), 14

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation (tSNS) with the Cefaly® device was recently found superior to sham stimulation for episodic migraine prevention in a randomized trial. Its safety ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation (tSNS) with the Cefaly® device was recently found superior to sham stimulation for episodic migraine prevention in a randomized trial. Its safety and efficiency in larger cohorts of headache sufferers in the general population remain to be determined.The objective of this study was to assess the satisfaction with the Cefaly® device in 2,313 headache sufferers who rented the device for a 40-day trial period via Internet. METHODS: Only subjects using specific anti-migraine drugs, and thus most likely suffering from migraine, were included in the survey. Adverse events (AEs) and willingness to continue tSNS were monitored via phone interviews after the trial period. A built-in software allowed monitoring the total duration of use and hence compliance in subjects who returned the device to the manufacturer after the trial period. RESULTS: After a testing period of 58.2 days on average, 46.6% of the 2,313 renters were not satisfied and returned the device, but the compliance check showed that they used it only for 48.6% of the recommended time. The remaining 54.4% of subjects were satisfied with the tSNS treatment and willing to purchase the device. Ninety-nine subjects out of the 2,313 (4.3%) reported one or more AEs, but none of them was serious. The most frequent AEs were local pain/intolerance to paresthesia (47 subjects, i.e. 2.03%), arousal changes (mostly sleepiness/fatigue, sometimes insomnia, 19 subjects, i.e. 0.82%), headache after the stimulation (12 subjects, i.e. 0.52%). A transient local skin allergy was seen in 2 subjects, i.e. 0.09%. CONCLUSIONS: This survey of 2,313 headache sufferers in the general population confirms that tSNS with is a safe and well-tolerated treatment for migraine headaches that provides satisfaction to a majority of patients who tested it for 40 days. Only 4.3% of subjects reported AEs, all of them were minor and fully reversible. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuromodulation of chronic headaches: position statement from the European Headache Federation
Martelletti, P; Jensen, R; Antal, A et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2013), 14

The medical treatment of patients with chronic primary headache syndromes (chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, chronic cluster headache, hemicrania continua) is challenging as serious side ... [more ▼]

The medical treatment of patients with chronic primary headache syndromes (chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, chronic cluster headache, hemicrania continua) is challenging as serious side effects frequently complicate the course of medical treatment and some patients may be even medically intractable. When a definitive lack of responsiveness to conservative treatments is ascertained and medication overuse headache is excluded, neuromodulation options can be considered in selected cases.Here, the various invasive and non-invasive approaches, such as hypothalamic deep brain stimulation, occipital nerve stimulation, stimulation of sphenopalatine ganglion, cervical spinal cord stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are extensively published although proper RCT-based evidence is limited. The European Headache Federation herewith provides a consensus statement on the clinical use of neuromodulation in headache, based on theoretical background, clinical data, and side effect of each method. This international consensus further gives recommendations for future studies on these new approaches.In spite of a growing field of stimulation devices in headaches treatment, further controlled studies to validate, strengthen and disseminate the use of neurostimulation are clearly warranted. Consequently, until these data are available any neurostimulation device should only be used in patients with medically intractable syndromes from tertiary headache centers either as part of a valid study or have shown to be effective in such controlled studies with an acceptable side effect profile. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) of the visual cortex: a proof-of-concept study based on interictal electrophysiological abnormalities in migraine
Vigano, Alessandro; Sasso d'Elia, Tullia; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2013), 14(23),

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See detailLateral inhibition in visual cortex of migraine patients between attacks
Coppola, Gianluca; Parisi, Vincenzo; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2013), 14

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See detailSustained efficacy of occipital nerve stimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache after up to 5 years treatment
Magis, Delphine ULg; Gérardy, Pierre-Yves; Remacle, Jean-Michel et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2010), 11(Suppl 1), 15

Background. Drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH) is a devastating condition for which various invasive procedures have been tempted without any satisfactory effect. Our prospective pilot study ... [more ▼]

Background. Drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH) is a devastating condition for which various invasive procedures have been tempted without any satisfactory effect. Our prospective pilot study of great occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in 8 drCCH patients showed encouraging results at 15 months (1). Methods. We recruited 15 patients with drCCH according to the previously published criteria of intractability (2). They were implanted with suboccipital stimulators on the side of their headache. Long-term follow-up was achieved by questionnaires administered during a headache consultation and/or by telephone interviews. Results. One patient had an immediate post operative infection of the material. Mean time with ONS was 28.8 months (range 3-60 months). Nine of the 14 remaining patients were totally pain-free (64%), 2 patients had an improvement in frequency exceeding 90% and one patient a 89% amelioration. Two patients did not respond or described mild improvement. Intensity of residual attacks was not improved by ONS. Four patients (29%) were able to reduce their prophylaxis. Common technical problems were battery depletion (N=8/14, 57%) and material infection (N=3/15, 20%). Recurrent battery replacement (until 2/ year in one patient) is now avoided by the availability of rechargeable batteries. Clinical peculiarities associated with ONS were occurrence of infrequent contralateral attacks (N=5/14, 36%), and/or isolated ispilateral autonomic attacks (N=5/14, 36%). Rapid attack recurrence after stimulator switch off was reported by 7/12 improved patients (58%). Two patients found ONS-related paresthesias unbearable; one had his stimulator removed, the other switched it off though he was objectively ameliorated. Subjectively, nine patients are very satisfied by ONS and one patient moderately satisfied. Conclusions. Our long-term follow-up confirms the efficacy of ONS in drCCH, which remains a safe and well-tolerated technique. The occurrence of contralateral attacks and isolated autonomic attacks in nearly 50% of ONS responders may have therapeutic and pathophysiological implications. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in visual-evoked potential habituation induced by hyperventilation in migraine.
Coppola, G.; Curra, A.; Sava, Simona ULg et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2010)

Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that ... [more ▼]

Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that worsens just before the attack. Hyperventilation slows electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and decreases the functional response in the occipital cortex during visual stimulation. The neural mechanisms underlying deficient-evoked potential habituation in migraineurs remain unclear. To find out whether hyperventilation alters VEP habituation, we recorded VEPs before and after experimentally induced hyperventilation lasting 3 min in 18 healthy subjects and 18 migraine patients between attacks. We measured VEP P100 amplitudes in six sequential blocks of 100 sweeps and habituation as the change in amplitude over the six blocks. In healthy subjects, hyperventilation decreased VEP amplitude in block 1 and abolished the normal VEP habituation. In migraine patients, hyperventilation further decreased the already low block 1 amplitude and worsened the interictal habituation deficit. Hyperventilation worsens the habituation deficit in migraineurs possibly by increasing dysrhythmia in the brainstem-thalamo-cortical network. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformances in cerebellar and neuromuscular transmission tests are correlated in migraine with aura.
Ambrosini, Anna; Sandor, Peter S; De Pasqua, Victor ULg et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2008), 9(1), 29-32

In previous studies, we described subclinical abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission and cerebellar functions in migraineurs. The aim of this study was to search if these two functions are correlated ... [more ▼]

In previous studies, we described subclinical abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission and cerebellar functions in migraineurs. The aim of this study was to search if these two functions are correlated in the same patient. Thirteen migraineurs [five without aura (MO) and eight with aura (MA)] underwent both stimulation-SFEMG and 3D-movement analysis. Single fiber EMG (SFEMG) results were expressed as the "mean value of consecutive differences" (mean MCD). Precision of arm-reaching movements (measured with an infrared optoelectronic tracking system) was expressed as the average deviation in the horizontal plane. Median values of mean MCD and mean horizontal deviation were not different between MO and MA. However, in MA, but not in MO, both variables were positively correlated. Thus, we conclude that neuromuscular transmission and cerebellar functions are correlated in the same patient when affected by migraine with aura. We suggest that this correlation might be due to a common molecular abnormality. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrophysiological response patterns of primary sensory cortices in migraine.
Ambrosini, Anna; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2006), 7(6), 377-88

Migraine is an ictal disorder characterised by a particular vulnerability of patients to sensory overload, both during and outside of the attack. Central nervous system dysfunctions are supposed to play a ... [more ▼]

Migraine is an ictal disorder characterised by a particular vulnerability of patients to sensory overload, both during and outside of the attack. Central nervous system dysfunctions are supposed to play a pivotal role in migraine. Electroneurophysiological methods, which aim to investigate sensory processing, seem thus particularly appropriate to study the pathophysiology of migraine. We have thus reviewed evoked potential studies performed in migraine patients. Although results are in part contradictory, these studies nonetheless demonstrate an interictal dysfunction of sensory cortices, and possibly of subcortical structures, in migraine with and without aura. The predominant abnormality is a deficient habituation of evoked responses to repeated stimuli, probably due to cortical, and possibly widespread neural, "dysexcitability". [less ▲]

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