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See detailValidation of the Food Frequency Questionnaire Used to Assess the Association between Dietary Habits and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the NESCAV Study
Sauvageot, Nicolas ULg; Guillaume, Michèle ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Journal of Food Science (2013), 3(3),

Abstract Background: In epidemiological studies, the validation of dietary assessment instruments is important to avoid biased associations with outcome measures. Objective: Our objective was to assess ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: In epidemiological studies, the validation of dietary assessment instruments is important to avoid biased associations with outcome measures. Objective: Our objective was to assess the validity of the 134-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the Nutrition Environment and Cardiovascular Health (NESCAV) study. Methods: The FFQ was validated against a 3-day dietary record (DR) on a sample of 29 women. The intra- class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman plots were used to assess absolute agreement, whereas relative agreement was appraised by Spearman’s correlation coefficient and Cohen kappa coefficient based on cross classification of 3-category nutrient intake. Results: The two methods differed significantly for the majority of micronutrients with FFQ yielding higher intakes than the DR. The bias between the two methods was nonetheless acceptable with an average overestimation by the FFQ of 11% for macronutrients and 29% for micronutrients. Regarding precision, results differed by 48% for micronutrients and 50% for macronutrients. Correlations on energy-adjusted data by the two methods were satisfactory with an average correlation of 0.47 and 16/25 coefficients above 0.40. Only vitamin A and cholesterol showed poor correlations of 0.02 and 0.05, respectively. On average, the correct classification rate in 3 categories was 50.3% and 19/25 kappa coefficients were above 0.20. Poor agreement was found for protein, cholesterol, starch, vitamins A, B12 and E with weighted kappa coefficient less than 0.20. Conclusion: Although absolute values of dietary intakes were not always accurate, the relationship and agreement between FFQ and DR may be considered as satisfactory. In particular, the FFQ was able to categorize subjects into 3 broad categories of intakes for most nutrients. Results for proteins, cholesterol, starch, vitamins A, E and B12 however ought to be interpreted with caution [less ▲]

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See detailCultivars, culture conditions and harvest time influence phenolic and ascorbic acid contents and antioxidant capacity of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa)
Pincemail, Joël ULg; Kevers, Claire ULg; Tabart, Jessica ULg et al

in Journal of Food Science (2012), 77

Strawberries are a good source of micronutrients, especially antioxidant phenolics. More information is needed to better exploit the health-promoting effect of such fruits. Several studies focused on the ... [more ▼]

Strawberries are a good source of micronutrients, especially antioxidant phenolics. More information is needed to better exploit the health-promoting effect of such fruits. Several studies focused on the effects of genotype, cultural practices and seasonal variation on the antioxidant potential of strawberries, but often yielding contradictory results and/or focusing on only one source of variability. In the present study, we showed that total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid and antioxidant capacity strongly differed between genotypes of strawberry. The precise results revealed the importance of genetic background for the antioxidant capacity and for the content of total phenolics (with up to 3.3-fold variations). Other parameters may also influence the antioxidant capacity in strawberry such as harvest time, culture conditions and environmental factors. Moreover, in this study, the harvesting time (at the same ripening stage) appeared to be very important, more important than genotype. Variations of the antioxidant capacity of up to 4.1-folds were observed following the harvesting time of “Elsanta” cultivar. [less ▲]

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See detailAntifungal activity of 2 lactic acid bacteria of the Weissella genus isolated from food
Ndagano, Dora; Lamoureux, Thibaut; Dortu, Carine et al

in Journal of Food Science (2011), 76(6), 305-311

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See detailTunisian Table Olive Phenolic Compounds And Their Antioxidant Capacity
Ben Othman, N.; Weber, Dominique ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Journal of Food Science (2008), 73(4),

For the 1st time, 4 olive cultivars, theMeski, Chemlali, Besbessi, and Tounsi, fromthe Tunisian market were investigated to evaluate the phenolic compounds’ contribution in nutritional value of table ... [more ▼]

For the 1st time, 4 olive cultivars, theMeski, Chemlali, Besbessi, and Tounsi, fromthe Tunisian market were investigated to evaluate the phenolic compounds’ contribution in nutritional value of table olives. From the Meski cultivar, we have chosen 4 different samples to evaluate differences within the same cultivar. Basic characteristics and total phenolic content were evaluated in flesh and kernel. The highest value of flesh phenolic content was observed in sample M4 of the Meski cultivar; however, the lowest value was observed in the Besbessi cultivar and they were 1801 and 339 mg GA/100 g dry weight, respectively. Themain simple phenolic compounds identified in flesh extracts are hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and vanillic acid. Oleuropein was not detected in any samples. The antioxidant activity of Tunisian olive flesh varies between 212 and 462 μM TEAC/g of dry weight. Antioxidant activity of olives was related to their phenolic content but we found a low correlation between phenolic content and TEAC [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of volatile compounds produced by 2 strains of Lactococcus lactis isolated from Leben (Tunisian fermented milk) using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography
Ziadi, M.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg; Marlier, Myriam ULg et al

in Journal of Food Science (2008), 73(6), 247-252

The volatile compounds that characterize Leben during fermentation with 2 Lactococcus lactis strains (SLT6 and SLT10) in flasks, in a 100-L fermentor, and during storage at 4 degrees C, were investigated ... [more ▼]

The volatile compounds that characterize Leben during fermentation with 2 Lactococcus lactis strains (SLT6 and SLT10) in flasks, in a 100-L fermentor, and during storage at 4 degrees C, were investigated and compared to those from commercial Leben. Volatile compounds from Leben were concentrated by a Carboxen-PDMS fiber and analyzed by GC-MS. These compounds include acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, sulfur compounds, and hydrocarbons. Commercial Leben presented a poor volatile profile compared to the laboratory-made Leben. The mixed culture of 2 Lactococcus lactis strains resulted in higher volatile compound formation than the single strain culture. The GC volatile profiles of Leben produced In flask and in the 100-L fermentor were similar. Changes in volatile compounds were observed during storage at 4 degrees C. The effect of culture conditions on production of volatiles by SLT6 strain was studied. Aeration (0.1 mL/min) and agitation enhanced the production of diacetyl, acetoin, 3-methylbutanal, and 3-methylbutanol. Fermentation at pH 5 had no effect on volatile production. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of extraction conditions on the yield and purity of apple pomace pectin precipitated but not washed by alcohol
Garna, Haikel; Mabon, Nicolas; Robert, Christelle et al

in Journal of Food Science (2007), 72(1), 1-9

A study of the influence of extraction condition (pH: 1.5 to 2; temperature: 80 to 90 degrees C; extraction time: 1 to 3 h), on the yield and purity of apple pomace pectin without elimination of ... [more ▼]

A study of the influence of extraction condition (pH: 1.5 to 2; temperature: 80 to 90 degrees C; extraction time: 1 to 3 h), on the yield and purity of apple pomace pectin without elimination of impurities by alcohol washing was carried out. The alcohol precipitate yields varied from 2.9% to 8.9% depending on the pH. At pH 1.5, these yields were higher than those obtained at pH 2 contrary to the galacturonic acid purity (%w/w). Compounds other than pectins were solubilized from the cell walls of apple pomace at pH 1.5, and they were precipitated with alcohol. The apple pectins obtained from the different extraction procedures were highly methylated (54.5% to 79.5%), especially when the conditions (temperature, pH) were drastic. Similar conclusions can be drawn for the neutral sugar content that decreased at pH 1.5 (arabinose, xylose, and galactose) or at the highest temperatures and extraction times (arabinose and galactose). The phenomenon of demethylation and pectin degradation of neutral sugars chains can be observed at acid pH, and long extraction times. The presence of high quantities of mannose or fructose, glucose, and xylose in the alcohol precipitate showed that pectin precipitation with ethanol was not specific. [less ▲]

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See detailGelling properties of whey proteins after enzymic fat hydrolysis
Blecker, Christophe ULg; Paquot, Michel ULg; Deroanne, C.

in Journal of Food Science (2000), 65(4), 561-563

The effect of residual fat hydrolysis upon the gelation of whey protein concentrate (WPC) was studied. Gelling properties of a commercial WPC and lipase-treated WPC were evaluated on the basis of least ... [more ▼]

The effect of residual fat hydrolysis upon the gelation of whey protein concentrate (WPC) was studied. Gelling properties of a commercial WPC and lipase-treated WPC were evaluated on the basis of least concentration endpoint gelation, penetration test, texture profile analysis and water-holding capacity. Heat treatment of lipase-treated WPC led to gels with the highest hardness, springiness, cohesiveness and water retention. Such transformed WPC could be advantageously used to help improve texture in formulated meat, bakery, and confectionery products. [less ▲]

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See detailTextural properties of pressure-induced gels of food proteins obtained under different temperatures including zero
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Osawa, S.; Hayashi, Rikimaru

in Journal of Food Science (1998), 63

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See detailImproved emulsifying and foaming of whey proteins after enzymic fat hydrolysis
Blecker, Christophe ULg; Paquot, Michel ULg; Lamberti, I. et al

in Journal of Food Science (1997), 62(1), 48-

In an effort to improve emulsifying and foaming of sweet whey and whey protein concentrate, we studied the hydrolysis of the residual fat in these preparations with a sn 1,3 specific lipase. This ... [more ▼]

In an effort to improve emulsifying and foaming of sweet whey and whey protein concentrate, we studied the hydrolysis of the residual fat in these preparations with a sn 1,3 specific lipase. This enzymatic lipolysis would convert almost all triglycerides into mono- and diglycerides which have strong surface-active properties. Therefore, the emulsifying and foaming capacities of such modified whey products should be increased in comparison with native products, as shown by results presented at both neutral pH and those similar to a salad dressing emulsion. It was also demonstrated that emulsions and foams formed with lipase-treated whey preparations were more shelf-stable. [less ▲]

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