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See detailLabeo rosae (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) in the Congo basin: a relict distribution or a historical introduction?
Van SteenBerge, Maarten; Gajdzik, Laura ULg; Chilala, Alex et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2014)

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See detailSound production in two species of damselfishes (Pomacentridae): Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus and Dascyllus aruanus
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2006), 69(2), 491-503

Agonistic sounds of two pomacentrid species, Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus and Dascyllus aruanus, were recorded in captivity. Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus produced trains of 2-5 pops, each composed of 18 ... [more ▼]

Agonistic sounds of two pomacentrid species, Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus and Dascyllus aruanus, were recorded in captivity. Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus produced trains of 2-5 pops, each composed of 18-25 cycles, with an average duration of 56 ms; most energy ranged from c. 100 to 1000 Hz. Dascyllus aruanus produced pops and chirps. Pops were generally composed of a single pulse, with 2-14 peaks and an average duration of 6.7 ms. Pops contained energy > 4 kHz, and peak frequency ranged from 680 to 1300 Hz. Chirps consisted of trains of 12-42 short pulses of three to six cycles, with durations varying from 0.6 to 1.27 ms; peak frequency varied from 3400 to 4100 Hz. Sound production in P. lacrymatus suggested that pomacentrids are derived from an ancestral taxon capable of sound production and that this capacity is a synapomorphy for the family. Although in the Pomacentridae, pops are typically composed of a single pulse, which is longer and higher pitched than chirps composed of a series of shorter pulses, D. aruanus chirps were higher pitched than its pops. Thus, acoustic variation in the genus Dascyllus is probably not more restricted than in the Pomacentridae. (c) 2006 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles [less ▲]

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See detailEarly development of the head skeleton in Brycon moorei (Pisces, Ostariophysi, Characidae)
Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Germeau, G.; Besancenet, P. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2005), 66(4), 996-1024

At hatching (15 h post fertilization), Brycon moorei possesses no skeletal structure. Thereafter, development is very rapid. The first oral teeth appear no later than 3 It post-hatching, but they remain ... [more ▼]

At hatching (15 h post fertilization), Brycon moorei possesses no skeletal structure. Thereafter, development is very rapid. The first oral teeth appear no later than 3 It post-hatching, but they remain covered with epithelium until c. 45 h. At 7 h, the trabecular bars and part of the cartilaginous visceral arches are visible and at 15 It, the dentaries and premaxillaries are present. At 25 h, i.e. the onset of piscivory and cannibalism (the yolk sac is only fully resorbed after 36 h), the oral teeth are fully developed, the first pharyngeal teeth are formed, and some head movements already appear synchronized, but the mouth cavity is not completely isolated from the neurocranium by bony structures. Thereafter, no new buccal or pharyngeal bony structure is visible until 45 h, when the maxilla and opercula appear, along with a new type of cannibalistic behaviour. Cartilage resorptions also start at 45 It, but with no concomitant replacement by formation of calcified structures. Later, development gradually becomes similar to that of many previously studied teleosts. The developmental pattern of B. moorei is thus extremely rapid in comparison with other teleosts, i.e. it prioritizes feeding structures that permit the expression of piscivory at a very early age. The uniqueness of this pattern is discussed in relation to ecological constraints on early feeding and fast growth. (c) 2005 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact implantation of a transmitter on Sarpa salpa behaviour: study with a computerized video tracking system
Jadot, Catherine; Donnay, Annick ULg; Ylieff, Marc ULg et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2005), 67(2), 589-595

Two transmitter masses (2 and 6% of the fish's mass) were selected to examine the interference of tags with the behaviour of Sarpa salpa using a computerized video tracking system based on digital imaging ... [more ▼]

Two transmitter masses (2 and 6% of the fish's mass) were selected to examine the interference of tags with the behaviour of Sarpa salpa using a computerized video tracking system based on digital imaging techniques. The study demonstrated that light transmitters had no effect on the behavioural variables studied, and a substantial bias in behaviour is introduced if heavier (6%) tags are used. (c) 2005 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. [less ▲]

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See detailRemodelling of the vertebral axis during metamorphic shrinkage in the pearlfish
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (2004), 64(1), 159-169

Body shortening was observed in the pearlfish Carapus homei during metamorphosis. The tenuis larva at first possessed a suite of osseous vertebral bodies of similar length. The reduction in both the ... [more ▼]

Body shortening was observed in the pearlfish Carapus homei during metamorphosis. The tenuis larva at first possessed a suite of osseous vertebral bodies of similar length. The reduction in both the number and size of vertebrae followed increasing decalcification, degeneration of organic tissue and shortening. This involved a complete degradation and disappearance of the caudal tip vertebrae, and there was a reduction in the size of most of the remaining vertebrae. The further development of the vertebrae began with ossification of the neural and haemal arches before that of the vertebral body. This second part of the development followed a gradient: a gradual decreases towards the caudal tip in the size of the vertebrae and their completeness. (C) 2004 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenetic variations of thermal optimum for growth, and its implication on thermolabile sex determination in blue tilapia
Baras, E.; Mpo'n'tcha, A.; Driouch, H. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2002), 61(3), 645-660

Knowledge of how the optimum temperature for growth (Tdegrees(opt)) varies during ontogeny, and how close it is to the temperatures that induce Phenotypic masculinization is fundamental to the ... [more ▼]

Knowledge of how the optimum temperature for growth (Tdegrees(opt)) varies during ontogeny, and how close it is to the temperatures that induce Phenotypic masculinization is fundamental to the understanding of the evolution of thermolabile sex determinism (TSD) in fishes. In blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus, Tdegrees(opt) is 32.6degrees C at the start of exogenous feeding (10 mg fish) and it decreases by c 1degrees C each time that the fish bode mass increases by an order of magnitude. Temperatures <35degrees C are not sufficient to induce complete phenotypic masculinization. Based on a multiple-regression model (r(2)=0.938) plotting growth against body mass and water temperature. genotypically female tilapia living at high temperatures during the thermosensitive period (21-28 days) and being reversed into phenotypic males should incur an initial growth disadvantage over fish living at Tdegrees(opt) but not over those living at slightly colder temperatures (27-29degrees C). This initial disadvantage would be later compensated for by faster growth because of between-sex growth dimorphism to the detriment of phenotypic females. These arguments suggest that there is no definite pressure against the selection of TSD in blue tilapia and probable other Oreochromis spp. (C) 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMorpho-anatomy of the otic region in carapid fishes : eco-morphological study of their otoliths
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Lagardère, Françoise

in Journal of Fish Biology (2001), 58

Carapid species are characterized by so-called otophysical structures (sonic muscles, broad first apophyses covering the anterior part of the swimbladder, etc.) The family includes pelagic (Pyramodon and ... [more ▼]

Carapid species are characterized by so-called otophysical structures (sonic muscles, broad first apophyses covering the anterior part of the swimbladder, etc.) The family includes pelagic (Pyramodon and Snyderidia) and benthic (Echiodon) species and ones that are either commensal with (Onuxodon, Carapus) or parasites of (Encheliophis) invertebrates (sea cucumbers, etc). The aim of the present work was to seek possible relationships between the structures of the inner ear (particularly the sagitta) on the one hand and otophysical structures and lifestyles within the Carapidae family. In the eight species studied, the otic cavity is wide, the saccular otosac and its sagitta are particularly developed. The sacculi touch each other on the median line. A comparison of the inner ear structures reveals notably that the species with the most developed sagitta and sacculus are those with the largest parapophyses and have a commensal or parasitic lifestyle. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic sex reversal of blue tilapia under constant and fluctuating thermal regimes, and its adaptive and evolutionary implications
Baras, E.; Prignon, Christian ULg; Gohoungo, G. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2000), 192

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See detailSibling cannibalism in dorada under experimental conditions. II. Effect of initial size heterogeneity, diet and light regime on early cannibalism
Baras, E.; Maxi, M. Y.; Ndao, J. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2000), 57

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See detailRelationship between the drift of macroinvertebrates and the activity of brown trout in a small stream
Giroux, F.; Ovidio, Michaël ULg; Philippart, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2000), 56(5), 1248-1257

Brown trout Saline trutta were most active in a small stream at night. dusk and dawn when drift rate was highest, but correlations between hourly drift rates and the trout's activity varied substantially ... [more ▼]

Brown trout Saline trutta were most active in a small stream at night. dusk and dawn when drift rate was highest, but correlations between hourly drift rates and the trout's activity varied substantially between individuals, between different dates for a single individual, and between different periods of the daily cycle. On some occasions. the trout were responsive to the total drift rate, either at night or during the day, and on others to the largest drifting organisms only (terrestrial organisms, adults of Ephemeroptera, Diptera and Trichoptera). The study supports the idea that trout adapt their activity pattern to the abundance of drifting prey, either as generalists towards any organism, or as specialists towards the largest ones. (C) 2000 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. [less ▲]

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See detailSibling cannibalism in dorada under experimental conditions. I. Ontogeny, dynamics, bioenergetics of cannibalism and prey size selectivity
Baras, E.; Ndao, E.; Maxi, M. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2000), 57

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See detailEarly development of the chondrocranium in Chrysichtys auratus (Pisces, Siluriformes, Claroteidae)
Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Chikou, Antoine; Lalèyé, Philippe et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (1999), 55

The inception and development of the cartilaginous cephalis skeleton of Chrysichthys auratus is described from hatching to about 18 days post-hatching. At hatching, no skeletal structure is present. Not ... [more ▼]

The inception and development of the cartilaginous cephalis skeleton of Chrysichthys auratus is described from hatching to about 18 days post-hatching. At hatching, no skeletal structure is present. Not until day 3 do clearly delimited cranial primordia become apparent. As in many siluriforms, the neurocranium is platybasic from the start, the suspensorium constitutes, with Meckel’s cartilage and the hyoid bar, a single cartilaginous element, and the junction between the front and rear of the neurocranium is complete on day 4. By day 8 the quadratomandibular joint has formed and the tectum posterius has appeared. Cartilage reduction first affects the trabecular bars, then, markedly, the visceral arches. By day 18 the braincase floor has almost disappeared. [less ▲]

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See detailField observations of the spawning behaviour of European grayling
Darchambeau, François ULg; Poncin, Pascal ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (1997), 51(5), 1066-1068

During observations of the River Ourthe, Belgium, 70 spawning attempts were recorded during the reproductive period of the European grayling. Thirty-six per sent of the spawning attempts proceeded to ... [more ▼]

During observations of the River Ourthe, Belgium, 70 spawning attempts were recorded during the reproductive period of the European grayling. Thirty-six per sent of the spawning attempts proceeded to completion, while interference by another male may explain some of the incomplete acts. Sneaking behaviour was observed and one spawning act included two males and one female. (C) 1997 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. [less ▲]

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See detailTerritorial and non-territorial spawning behaviour in the bream
Poncin, Pascal ULg; Philippart, Jean-Claude ULg; Ruwet, J. C.

in Journal of Fish Biology (1996), 49(4), 622-626

The spawning behaviour of bream Abramis brama was studied in 1993, in a harbour on the River Meuse, Belgium. Fish spaced from 22 to 27 April and from 11 to 14 May, when the water temperature rose to 14.5 ... [more ▼]

The spawning behaviour of bream Abramis brama was studied in 1993, in a harbour on the River Meuse, Belgium. Fish spaced from 22 to 27 April and from 11 to 14 May, when the water temperature rose to 14.5 degrees C. The reproductive behaviour of the bream was studied within a 15 m long part of the harbour using a video camera. Territorial males with tubercles (33-43 cm total length; > 5 years old) defended bank areas of diameter 80-150 cm which included spawning substratum, i.e. roots of alder and willow trees and aquatic plants. Water depth ranged from 25 to 50 cm. Non-territorial males without tubercles (24-33 cm; 3-4 years old), remained 2-4 m away from the bank. Aggressive behaviour between males was frequent and, occasionally, males with tubercles were unable to defend a territory. Mature females (25-43 cm; > 3 years old), coming from the deeper water of the surrounding area, were followed by non-territorial males before spawning in territories near the bank. (C) 1996 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles [less ▲]

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See detailA field observation on the influence of aggressive behaviour on mating success in the European grayling
Poncin, Pascal ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (1996), 48(4), 802-804

The biggest male grayling present on a spawning area was strongly territorial and developed more aggressive behaviours than smaller males. However, its spawning frequency was similar to that of smaller ... [more ▼]

The biggest male grayling present on a spawning area was strongly territorial and developed more aggressive behaviours than smaller males. However, its spawning frequency was similar to that of smaller males. (C) 1996 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles [less ▲]

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See detailFIELD OBSERVATIONS ON A MATING ATTEMPT OF A SPAWNING GRAYLING, THYMALLUS-THYMALLUS WITH A FEEDING BARBEL, BARBUS-BARBUS
Poncin, Pascal ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (1994), 45(5), 904-906

During the spawning period of the grayling, one male was sexually stimulated by a feeding barbel and consequently exhibited the behavioural pattern of 'approach', 'quivering' and 'dorsal fin clasping'.

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See detailBehavioural study of hybridization between Barbus barbus and Barbus meridionalis
Poncin, Pascal ULg; Jeandarme, J.; Berrebi, P.

in Journal of Fish Biology (1994), 45

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See detailINFLUENCE OF THE DAILY DISTRIBUTION OF LIGHT ON REPRODUCTION IN THE BARBEL, BARBUS-BARBUS (L)
Poncin, Pascal ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (1992), 41(6), 993-997

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