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See detailXanthine urolithiasis causing bilateral ureteral obstruction in a 10-month-old cat
Mestrinho, Lisa; Gonçalves, T.; Parreira, P. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2013), 15(10), 911-916

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See detailMechanisms, causes, investigation, and management of vomiting disorders in cats: a literature review
Batchelor, Daniel J.; Devauchelle, Patrick; Elliott, Jonathan et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2013), 15(4), 237-265

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See detailMechanisms, causes, investigation, and management of vomiting disorders in cats: a literature review
Batchelor, Daniel J.; Devauchelle, Patrick; Elliott, Jonathan et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2013), 15(4), 237-265

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See detailOpen surgical correction combined with an external splint for correction of a non compliant pectus excavatum in a cat
Mestrinho, Lisa; Ferreira, C.; Lopes A.M. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2012), 14(2), 151-154

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See detailFeline herpesvirus 1 and feline calicivirus infections in a heterogeneous cat population of a rescue shelter.
Zicola, Angélique ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Quatpers, Dominique et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11(12), 1023-7

Feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV), associated with upper respiratory tract disease, are highly prevalent in cats worldwide. With the aim to investigate the importance of feline ... [more ▼]

Feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV), associated with upper respiratory tract disease, are highly prevalent in cats worldwide. With the aim to investigate the importance of feline respiratory viruses in a heterogeneous population of cats, samples were taken in a rescue shelter in Liege, Belgium, between March 2005 and August 2006. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to diagnose FCV and FeHV-1 infection in the sampled cats. The prevalence rate (33.1%) was higher for FCV than for FeHV-1 (20.1%) whereas prevalence rate of co-infection with both viruses was 10%. Gingivitis was more common in FCV infections (odds ratio (OR)=2.83) whereas respiratory signs were more often observed with FeHV-1 infections. The average age was significantly higher in FCV positive cats (38 months) than in FeHV-1 positive cats (29.9 months). The second and the fourth quarters of the year and the two first quarters were significantly more at risk than the others in the case of FeHV-1 and FCV infection, respectively. Age was found to be a confounding factor. High prevalence of both infections strengthens the importance of applying hygienic and preventive measures in rescue shelters where cats with an unknown status of vaccination are introduced. [less ▲]

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See detailVaccines and vaccination. The principles and the polemics
Horzinek, M. C.; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline panleukopenia virus infection. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Truyen, U.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline herpesvirus infection. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline calcivirus infection. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Radford, A. R.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline leukaemia. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Lutz, H.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline immunodeficiency. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Hosie, M. J.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline rabies. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Frymus, T.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailFeline infectious peritonitis. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Addie, D.; Belak, B.; Boucraut-Baralon, C. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailChlamydophila felis infection. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Gruffydd-Jones, T.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailBordetella bronchiseptica infection in cats. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Egberink, H.; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailH5N1 avian influenza virus infection in cats. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Addie, D.; Belak, B. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2009), 11

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See detailTreatment of 46 cats with porcine insulin zinc suspension – a prospective study
Michiels, L.; Boari, A.; Bewig, K. et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2008)

This prospective, multicentre, non-blinded, open study followed 46 cats with diabetes mellitus during treatment with porcine lente insulin (also known as porcine insulin zinc suspension, Caninsulin ... [more ▼]

This prospective, multicentre, non-blinded, open study followed 46 cats with diabetes mellitus during treatment with porcine lente insulin (also known as porcine insulin zinc suspension, Caninsulin, Intervet) for 16+/-1 weeks (stabilization phase), with additional monitoring of some cats (n=23) for a variable period. At least three of the following were present at initial presentation: appropriate history of clinical signs consistent with diabetes mellitus, glucosuria, blood glucose greater than 15 mmol/l and fructosamine greater than 380 micromol/l. Insulin treatment was started at a dose rate of 0.25-0.5 IU/kg body weight twice daily, with a maximum starting dose of 2 IU/injection. Twenty-eight of the cats were classed as reaching clinical stability during the study, in 23 of these cats this was during the stabilization phase. Seven cats went into remission during the stabilization phase and one of the cats in week 56. Clinical signs of hypoglycaemia, significantly associated with a dose of 3 units or 0.5 IU/kg or more per cat (twice daily), were observed in nine of the 46 cats during the stabilization phase and concomitant biochemical hypoglycaemia was recorded in most cases. Biochemical hypoglycaemia, recorded in 6% of the blood glucose curves performed during the stabilization phase, was significantly associated with a dose rate of 0.75 IU/kg or more twice daily. This further highlights the need for cautious stepwise changes in insulin dose. The protocol used in the present study is suitable for and easy to use in practice. This study confirmed the efficacy and safety of porcine lente insulin (Caninsulin) in diabetic cats under field conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailInhaled fluticasone reduces bronchial responsiveness and airway inflammation in cats with mild chronic bronchitis
Kirschvink, N; Leemans, Jérôme ULg; Delvaux, François et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2006), 8(1), 45-54

This study investigated the effect of inhaled fluticasone on lower airway inflammation and bronchial responsiveness (BR) to inhaled carbachol in cats with very mild, chronic bronchitis (n = 5) that were ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the effect of inhaled fluticasone on lower airway inflammation and bronchial responsiveness (BR) to inhaled carbachol in cats with very mild, chronic bronchitis (n = 5) that were compared with healthy cats serving as controls (n = 6). Chest radiographs, BR tests performed non-invasively by barometric whole body plethysmography (BWBP) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were performed before and after treatment. BR was quantified by calculating the concentration of carbachol inducing bronchoconstriction (C-Penh300%), defined as a 300% increase of baseline Penh, an index of bronchoconstriction obtained by BWBP. BAL fluid was analyzed cytologically and the oxidant marker 8-iso-PGF2α was determined. At test 1, healthy cats and cats with bronchitis were untreated, whereas for test 2 inhalant fluticasone (250 μg once daily) was administrated for 2 consecutive weeks to cats with bronchitis. Control cats remained untreated. Inhaled fluticasone induced a significant increase in C-Penh300% and a significant decrease of BAL fluid total cells, macrophages, neutrophils and 8-iso-PGF2α in cats with bronchitis, whilst untreated control cats did not show significant changes over time. This study shows that a 2-week fluticasone treatment significantly reduced lower airway inflammation in very mild bronchitis. BR could be successfully monitored in cats using BWPB and decreased significantly in response to inhaled fluticasone. 8-Iso-PGF2α in BAL fluid was responsive to treatment and appeared as a sensitive biomarker of lower airway inflammation in cats. [less ▲]

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See detailA retrospective study of non-specific rhinitis in 22 cats and the value of nasal cytology and histopathology
Michiels, L.; Day, M. J.; Snaps, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2003), 5(5), 279-285

Case records from 40 cats subjected to rhinoscopic examination for investigation of chronic nasal disease were reviewed. Cases in which no specific underlying cause (eg neoplasia) was detected were ... [more ▼]

Case records from 40 cats subjected to rhinoscopic examination for investigation of chronic nasal disease were reviewed. Cases in which no specific underlying cause (eg neoplasia) was detected were further selected for detailed retrospective study. In these 22 cats (55% of the initial population), a final diagnosis of non-specific chronic nasal disease was made. The radiographic, rhinoscopic, cytological and histopathological findings were reviewed. Mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained in 20 cases. Despite clinical signs of more than 4 weeks duration, histopathology indicated acute inflammation in four cases. Two cases had chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and 14 had mixed (lymphoplasmacytic and neutrophilic) inflammation. Specimens for cytology were obtained from 17 cases by brush sampling. Three of these samples were not diagnostic due to the poor quality of the slides; one showed normal cytology. Acute inflammation was diagnosed by cytology (n = 11) more commonly than chronic (n = 1) or mixed inflammation (n = 1). Concurrent samples, of quality suitable for both histopathological and cytological interpretation, were collected from 12 cases only. Cytological results were in agreement with the histological results in 25%, of these cases, the main discrepancy being the nature of the dominant inflammatory cell type. Therefore cytology does not appear to be a reliable means for detection of chronic inflammation. Further studies are needed in order to investigate the correlation between the nature of mucosal inflammation as defined by both histological and cytological evaluation, and the relationship of these test results to prognosis and therapy. (C) 2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of ESFM and AAFP. [less ▲]

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See detailHemiurothorax following diaphragmatic hernia and kidney prolapse in a cat.
Stork, Christoph; Hamaide, Annick ULg; Schwedes, Claudia et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2003), 5(2), 91-96

A 3-year-old cat was presented with increasing dyspnoea over the past four days. Unilateral pleural effusion was diagnosed and a modified transudate was drained several times. Surgical exploration ... [more ▼]

A 3-year-old cat was presented with increasing dyspnoea over the past four days. Unilateral pleural effusion was diagnosed and a modified transudate was drained several times. Surgical exploration revealed intra-thoracic prolapse of the left kidney and partial herniation of the spleen through a dorsal, circumferential diaphragmatic tear. Biochemical analysis of the pleural fluid confirmed urothorax. Due to excessive fibrin deposit on the well-vascularised kidney it was impossible to re-establish left urinary pathways. Left-sided nephrectomy and diaphragmatic herniorrhaphy were performed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and complete. This is the first report of an urothorax in veterinary medical literature. (C) 2002 ESFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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