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See detailSound production mechanism in Gobius paganellus (Gobiidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Kever, Loïc ULg; Boyle, Kelly ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2013), 216

Gobiidae, the largest fish family (>1500 species), has species from at least 10 genera that produce sounds for communication. Studies focused on goby sound production mechanisms have suggested that sounds ... [more ▼]

Gobiidae, the largest fish family (>1500 species), has species from at least 10 genera that produce sounds for communication. Studies focused on goby sound production mechanisms have suggested that sounds are produced by the forcible ejection of water through small apertures in the opercles (hydrodynamic mechanism). The present study was a multidisciplinary investigation (morphology, muscle histology, high-speed video, sound analysis and electromyography) of the sound emission mechanism in Gobius paganellus, which produces both pulsed and tonal calls. Two populations were used, from Brittany and Venice. In the French population, sounds were accompanied by a suite of coordinated movements of the buccal, branchial and opercular regions. This was not the case in the Venetian population, and thus the direct role of head movements in sound production was rejected. The hydrodynamic mechanism hypothesis was also rejected in G. paganellus on the basis of sound oscillogram shape and because sounds are still produced after the opercles and hyohyoid muscles are cut. The use of both electromyography and electron microscopy showed that the levator pectoralis muscle, which originates on the skull and inserts on the dorsal tip of the cleithrum, is involved in sound production. We propose that the contraction of this muscle and associated vibration of the large radials is used to make sounds. In addition, we propose that different sound types (pulsed sounds and tonal calls) could occur because of differences in fish size. [less ▲]

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See detailFurther insight into the sound-producing mechanism of clownfishes: what structure is involved in sound radiation?
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Nakamura, Masaru; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2012), 215

It was recently demonstrated that clownfishes produce aggressive sounds by snapping their jaw teeth. To date, only the onset of the sound has been studied, which raises the question, what structure is ... [more ▼]

It was recently demonstrated that clownfishes produce aggressive sounds by snapping their jaw teeth. To date, only the onset of the sound has been studied, which raises the question, what structure is involved in sound radiation? Here, a combination of different approaches has been used to determine the anatomical structure(s) responsible for the size-related variations observed in sound duration and frequency. Filling the swimbladder with physiological liquid specifically modified size-related acoustic features by inducing a significant decrease in pulse duration of approximately 3 ms and a significant increase in dominant frequency of approximately 105 Hz. However, testing the acoustics of the swimbladder by striking it with a piezoelectric impact hammer showed that this structure is a highly damped sound source prevented from prolonged vibrations. In contrast, the resonant properties of the rib cage seems to account for the size-related variations observed in acoustic features. For an equivalent strike on the rib cage, the duration and dominant frequency of induced sounds changed with fish size: sound duration and dominant frequency were positively and negatively correlated with fish size, respectively. Such relationships between sonic features and fish size are consistent with those observed in natural sounds emitted by fish. Therefore, the swimbladder itself does not act as a resonator; its wall just seems to be driven by the oscillations of the rib cage. This set of observations suggests the need for reassessment of the acoustic role of swimbladders in various fish species. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological responses of the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis to bacterial stress from vibrio coralliilyticus
Vidal-Dupiol, Jérémie; Ladrière, Ophélie ULg; Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

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See detailSound production in red-bellied piranhas (Pygocentrus nattereri, Kner): an acoustical, behavioural and morphofunctional study
Millot, Sandie; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

Piranhas are known to be sound-producing animals. Nevertheless, the biological significance of piranha calls remains unclear because sounds have been recorded only when specimens were held by hand or ... [more ▼]

Piranhas are known to be sound-producing animals. Nevertheless, the biological significance of piranha calls remains unclear because sounds have been recorded only when specimens were held by hand or trapped in a gill net. These sounds are generated by rapid contractions of sonic muscles that insert on a broad tendon surrounding ventrally the cranial sac of the swimbladder. The piranha swimbladder is thought to play an important role in sound production as an impedance-matching device and as a resonator. However, the vibratory capacities of the cranial and caudal sacs and the exact role of both sacs in sound production remain poorly understood. In this study, three sounds were each associated to a specific behaviour. The first sound (type 1) was produced during frontal display; it had numerous pulses and lasted 140±17 ms, with a fundamental frequency of 120±4 Hz. It corresponded to the sound made by hand-held fishes. The second sound (type 2) was produced during circling and fighting behaviour; it was a single pulse lasting 36±8 ms, with a fundamental frequency of 43±10 Hz. The third sound (type 3) corresponded to chasing behaviour and comprised three to four pulses, each lasting 3±1 ms, with a fundamental frequency of 1739±18 Hz. Using a laser vibrometer to study the swimbladder displacement when stimulated at different frequencies, it was demonstrated that the first two sounds corresponded to the swimbladder mechanism. By contrast, the third sound was associated with the jaw mechanism. The vibrometer indicated that the swimbladder is a highly damping structure, simply copying the sonic muscle contraction rate. This study provides two interesting insights. First, it shows the relationships between three kinds of piranha sound and three specific behaviours. Second, using muscle stimulation at different rates, it shows which simultaneous conditions are required for production of sound in this species. Swimbladder calls were produced by a muscle contraction rate of approximately 100 Hz because this periodicity allowed the swimbladder to vibrate. At this frequency range, the contraction–relaxation cycles of the swimbladder muscles engendered wall displacements that had short amplitudes and with only a small variability between them. [less ▲]

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See detailHearing and morphological specializations of the mojarra (Eucinostomus argenteus)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Mann, Kenneth; Mann, David

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized ... [more ▼]

The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized connection between the swimbladder and ear in the mojarra, as well as a modified cone on the anal fin in which the posterior end of the swimbladder sits. Hearing tests show the mojarra has better hearing sensitivity than other species of fish without a connection. However, mojarras do not seem to use this adaptation for communication. Furthermore, the inclined position of the swimbladder may help the fish to catch their prey more easily, as the swimbladder will be horizontal when they are picking up benthic prey. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production and mechanism in Heniochus chrysostomus (Chaetodontidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Boyle, Kelly; Berten, Laetitia ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection ... [more ▼]

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection behaviors. Pulsatile sounds are associated with dorsal elevation of the head, anterior extension of the ventral pectoral girdle and dorsal elevation of the caudal skeleton in Forcipiger flavissiumus. In Hemitaurichthys polylepis, extrinsic swimbladder muscles could be involved in sounds originating from the swimbladder and correspond to the inward buckling of tissues situated dorsally in front of the swimbladder. These examples suggest that this mode of communication could be present in other members of the family. Sounds made by the pennant bannerfish (Heniochus chrysostomus) were recorded for the first time on coral reefs and when fish were hand held. In hand-held fishes, three types of calls were recorded: isolated pulses (51%), trains of four to 11 pulses (19%) and trains preceded by an isolated pulse (29%). Call frequencies were harmonic and had a fundamental frequency between 130 and 180Hz. The fundamental frequency, sound amplitude and sound duration were not related to fish size. Data from morphology, sound analysis and electromyography recordings highlight that the calls are made by extrinsic sonic drumming muscles in association with the articulated bones of the ribcage. The pennant bannerfish system differs from other Chaetodontidae in terms of sound characteristics, associated body movements and, consequently, mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailStable isotopes of captive Cetaceans (Killer Whales and Bottlenose dolphins)
Caut, Stéphane; Laran, Sophie; Garcia-Hartmann, Emmanuel et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

There is currently a great deal of interest in using stable-isotope methods to investigate diet, trophic level and migration movement in wild cetaceans. Fundamental to the interpretation of these methods ... [more ▼]

There is currently a great deal of interest in using stable-isotope methods to investigate diet, trophic level and migration movement in wild cetaceans. Fundamental to the interpretation of these methods is the need to understand how diet isotopic values are reflected in consumer tissues. In this study, we investigated patterns of isotopic discrimination between diet and blood constituents of two species of cetaceans (killer whale, Orcinus orca and 19 bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncutus) fed with controlled diets during 350 days. Diet discrimination factors ( ) for plasma were estimated to 13C =2.3‰ and 1520 N =1.8‰ respectively for both species and to 13C =2.7‰ and 1521 N =0.5‰ for red blood cells (RBC). Delipidation had no significant effect on carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of blood constituents, confirming that cetacean blood no serving as reservoirs of lipids. In contrast, carbon isotopic values are higher in delipidated samples of blubber, liver and muscle of orca tissues. The mean half life for plasma was 32.9 days for killer whales and 27.2 days for bottlenose dolphin and for RBC was greater than 175 days. The potential for conflict between fisheries and cetaceans has heightened the need for trophic information about this taxa within those ecosystems. These results provide the first published stable isotope turnover rates and discrimination factors for cetaceans, which are essential if conclusions are to be drawn on issues concerning trophic structures, carbon sources and diet reconstruction. [less ▲]

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See detailCall properties and morphology of the sound-producing organ in Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Bouillac, Grégory; Dragicevic, Branko et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2010), 213

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See detailFunctional study of the pectoral spine stridulation mechanism in different mochokid catfishes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fabri, Grégory ULg; Kaatz, Ingrid et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2010), 213

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See detailPotential mechanism of sound production in Oreochromis niloticus (Cichlidae)
Longrie, Nicolas ULg; Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Mauguit, Quentin ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2009), 212

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See detailHearing ability in three clownfish species
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Mann, David

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2009), 212

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See detailSound production mechanism in carapid fish: first example with a slow sonic muscle
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lagardere, J. P.; Braquegnier, J. B. et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2006), 209(15), 2952-2960

Fish sonic swimbladder muscles are the fastest muscles in vertebrates and have fibers with numerous biochemical and structural adaptations for speed. Carapid fishes produce sounds with a complex ... [more ▼]

Fish sonic swimbladder muscles are the fastest muscles in vertebrates and have fibers with numerous biochemical and structural adaptations for speed. Carapid fishes produce sounds with a complex swimbladder mechanism, including skeletal components and extrinsic sonic muscle fibers with an exceptional helical myofibrillar structure. To study this system we stimulated the sonic muscles, described their insertion and action and generated sounds by slowly pulling the sonic muscles. We find the sonic muscles contract slowly, pulling the anterior bladder and thereby stretching a thin fenestra. Sound is generated when the tension trips a release system that causes the fenestra to snap back to its resting position. The sound frequency does not correspond to the calculated resonant frequency of the bladder, and we hypothesize that it is determined by the snapping fenestra interacting with an overlying bony swimbladder plate. To our knowledge this tension release mechanism is unique in animal sound generation. [less ▲]

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See detailHomologous recombinant growth hormone and calcium metabolism in the tilapia oreochromis mossambicus, adapted to freshwater
Flik, G.; Atsma, W.; Fenwick, J. C. et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (1993)

Homologous recombinant tilapia growth hormoe was tested for its effect on calcium metabolism in freshwater tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus. A comparison of the role of GH and prolactin in calcium ... [more ▼]

Homologous recombinant tilapia growth hormoe was tested for its effect on calcium metabolism in freshwater tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus. A comparison of the role of GH and prolactin in calcium regulation of the tilapia led to the conclusion that GH has specific calciopropic effects on freshwater Tilapia that differ from those of prolactin. [less ▲]

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