References of "Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience"
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See detailThe neural basis of temporal order processing in past and future thought
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2015), 27

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See detailBlue Light Stimulates Cognitive Brain Activity in Visually Blind Individuals
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Collignon, Olivier; Hull, Joseph et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailNeural precursors of delayed insight
Darsaud, Annabelle ULg; Wagner, Ullrich; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(8), 1900-1910

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful ... [more ▼]

The solution of a problem left unresolved in the evening can sometimes pop into mind as a sudden insight after a night of sleep in the following morning. Although favorable effects of sleep on insightful behavior have been experimentally confirmed, the neural mechanisms determining this delayed insight remain unknown. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterize the neural precursors of delayed insight in the number reduction task (NRT), in which a hidden task structure can be learned implicitly, but can also be recognized explicitly in an insightful process, allowing immediate qualitative improvement in task performance. Normal volunteers practiced the NRT during two fMRI sessions (training and retest), taking place 12 hours apart after a night of sleep. After this delay, half of the subjects gained insight into the hidden task structure ("solvers," S), whereas the other half did not ("nonsolvers," NS). Already at training, solvers and nonsolvers differed in their cerebral responses associated with implicit learning. In future solvers, responses were observed in the superior frontal sulcus, posterior parietal cortex, and the insula, three areas mediating controlled processes and supporting early learning and novice performance. In contrast, implicit learning was related to significant responses in the hippocampus in nonsolvers. Moreover, the hippocampus was functionally coupled with the basal ganglia in nonsolvers and with the superior frontal sulcus in solvers, thus potentially biasing participants' strategy towards implicit or controlled processes of memory encoding, respectively. Furthermore, in solvers but not in nonsolvers, response patterns were further transformed overnight, with enhanced responses in ventral medial prefrontal cortex, an area previously implicated in the consolidation of declarative memory. During retest in solvers, before they gain insight into the hidden rule, significant responses were observed in the same medial prefrontal area. After insight, a distributed set of parietal and frontal areas is recruited among which information concerning the hidden rule can be shared in a so-called global workspace. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo distinct neuronal networks mediate the awareness of environment and of self
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2011), 23(3), 570-578

Evidence from functional neuroimaging studies on resting state suggests that there are two distinct anticorrelated cortical systems that mediate conscious awareness: an "extrinsic" system that encompasses ... [more ▼]

Evidence from functional neuroimaging studies on resting state suggests that there are two distinct anticorrelated cortical systems that mediate conscious awareness: an "extrinsic" system that encompasses lateral fronto-parietal areas and has been linked with processes of external input (external awareness), and an "intrinsic" system which encompasses mainly medial brain areas and has been associated with internal processes (internal awareness). The aim of our study was to explore the neural correlates of resting state by providing behavioral and neuroimaging data from healthy volunteers. With no a priori assumptions, we first determined behaviorally the relationship between external and internal awareness in 31 subjects. We found a significant anticorrelation between external and internal awareness with a mean switching frequency of 0.05 Hz (range: 0.01-0.1 Hz). Interestingly, this frequency is similar to BOLD fMRI slow oscillations. We then evaluated 22 healthy volunteers in an fMRI paradigm looking for brain areas where BOLD activity correlated with "internal" and "external" scores. Activation of precuneus/posterior cingulate, anterior cingulate/mesiofrontal cortices, and parahippocampal areas ("intrinsic system") was linearly linked to intensity of internal awareness, whereas activation of lateral fronto-parietal cortices ("extrinsic system") was linearly associated with intensity of external awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or ... [more ▼]

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or wishful thinking. The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate the neural basis of such goal-directed processing during future-event simulation. Participants were scanned while they imagined future events that were related to their personal goals (personal future events) and future events that were plausible but unrelated to their personal goals (nonpersonal future events). Results showed that imaging personal future events elicited stronger activation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared to imaging nonpersonal future events. Moreover, these brain activations overlapped with activations elicited by a second task that assessed semantic self-knowledge (i.e., making judgments on one's own personality traits), suggesting that ventral MPFC and PCC mediate self-referential processing across different functional domains. It is suggested that these brain regions may support a collection of processes that evaluate, code, and contextualize the relevance of mental representations with regard to personal goals. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the function instantiated by the default network of the brain are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe commonality of neural networks for verbal and visual short-term memory.
Majerus, Steve ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Martinez Perez, Trecy ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22(11), 2570-2593

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared ... [more ▼]

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared neural correlates supporting verbal and visual STM. We hypothesized that networks involved in attentional and executive processes, as well as networks involved in serial order processing, underlie STM for both verbal and visual list information, with neural specificity restricted to sensory areas involved in processing the specific items to be retained. Participants were presented sequences of nonwords or unfamiliar faces, and were instructed to maintain and recognize order or item information. For encoding and retrieval phases, null conjunction analysis revealed an identical fronto-parieto-cerebellar network comprising the left intraparietal sulcus, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral cerebellum, irrespective of information type and modality. A network centered around the right intraparietal sulcus supported STM for order information, in both verbal and visual modalities. Modality-specific effects were observed in left superior temporal and mid-fusiform areas associated with phonological and orthographic processing during the verbal STM tasks, and in right hippocampal and fusiform face processing areas during the visual STM tasks, wherein these modality effects were most pronounced when storing item information. The present results suggest that STM emerges from the deployment of modality-independent attentional and serial ordering processes toward sensory networks underlying the processing and storage of modality-specific item information. [less ▲]

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See detailSelective involvement of the right dorsal occipital stream for the spatial processing of sounds in early blind subjects
Collignon, O; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Voss, P et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22(Suppl. 1),

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See detailThe use of perceptual fluency in patients with Alzheimer disease: the role of expectation
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2008, April)

We investigated whether the use of perceptual fluency as recognition cue by patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) depends on whether fluency is perceived as relevant to the recognition decision. In normal ... [more ▼]

We investigated whether the use of perceptual fluency as recognition cue by patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) depends on whether fluency is perceived as relevant to the recognition decision. In normal subjects, enhanced perceptual fluency increased positive recognition responses when study and test stimuli were presented in the same sensory modality but not when stimuli were presented in different modalities (Westerman et al., J. of Mem. & Lang., 47, 2002). These results suggest that the use of perceptual fluency as a heuristic in recognition memory depends on the correspondence between study and test modalities and thus on the perceived usefulness of fluency. We investigated this change of sensory modality between study and test phases in 16 AD patients and 16 matched normal controls by using a verbal recognition task. The perceptual fluency of recognition test items was enhanced by briefly presenting a prime that matched the subsequent test item. We observed that changes in modality attenuated the contribution of fluency to the recognition decision in both subjects groups. In addition, we noted a positive correlation between fluency use and metamemory self-evaluation. These results suggest that the fluency heuristic is subject to metacognitive control in AD patients, exactly in the same way as normal subject, since patients’ attributions of perceptual fluency depend on expectations about relevance of fluency as memory cue. [less ▲]

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See detailDistinct regions of the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with self-referential processing and perspective taking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Ruby, Perinne; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2007), 19(6), 935-944

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) appears to play a prominent role in two fundamental aspects of social cognition, that is, self-referential processing and perspective taking. However, it is currently ... [more ▼]

The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) appears to play a prominent role in two fundamental aspects of social cognition, that is, self-referential processing and perspective taking. However, it is currently unclear whether the same or different regions of the MPFC mediate these two interdependent processes. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study sought to clarify the issue by manipulating both dimensions in a factorial design. Participants judged the extent to which trait adjectives described their own personality (e.g., 'Are you sociable?') or the personality of a close friend (e.g., 'Is Caroline sociable?') and were also asked to put themselves in the place of their friend (i.e., to take a third-person perspective) and estimate how this person would judge the adjectives, with the target of the judgments again being either the self (e.g., 'According to Caroline, are you sociable?') or the other person (e.g., 'According to Caroline, is she sociable?'). We found that self-referential processing (i.e., judgments targeting the self vs. the other person) yielded activation in the ventral and dorsal anterior MPFC, whereas perspective taking (i.e., adopting the other person's perspective, rather than one's own, when making judgments) resulted in activation in the posterior dorsal MPFC; the interaction between the two dimensions yielded activation in the left dorsal MPFC. These findings show that self-referential processing and perspective taking recruit distinct regions of the MPFC and suggest that the left dorsal MPFC may be involved in decoupling one's own from other people's perspectives on the self. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial mind representation: Where does it fail in frontotemporal dementia?
Ruby, P.; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Hogge, Michaël et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2007), 19(4), 671-683

We aimed at investigating social disability and its cerebral correlates in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To do so, we contrasted answers of patients with early-stage FTD and of their relatives on ... [more ▼]

We aimed at investigating social disability and its cerebral correlates in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To do so, we contrasted answers of patients with early-stage FTD and of their relatives on personality trait judgment and on behavior prediction in social and emotional situations. Such contrasts were compared to control contrasts calculated with answers of matched controls tested with their relatives. in addition, brain metabolism was measured in patients with positron emission tomography and the [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose method. Patients turned out to be as accurate as controls in describing their relative's personality, but they failed to predict their relative's behavior in social and emotional circumstances. Concerning the self, patients were impaired both in Current personality assessment and in prediction of their own behavior. Those two self-evaluation measures did not correlate. Only patients' anosognosia for social behavioral disability was found to be related to decreased metabolic activity in the left temporal pole. Such results suggest that anosognosia for social disability in FTD originates in impaired processing of emotional autobiographical information, leading to a self-representation that does not match current behavior. Moreover, we propose that perspective-taking disability participates in anosognosia, preventing patients from correcting their inaccurate self-representation based on their relative's perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailIs the feeling of familiarity driven by weak recollection as well as by an independent familiarity mechanism?
Montaldi, Daniela; Bastin, Christine ULg; Venables, Louise et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2003), 15(Supplemental), 179

The aim of this experiment is to examine how recollection and familiarity change over time and whether there is a qualitative difference between familiar items that were previously recollected and items ... [more ▼]

The aim of this experiment is to examine how recollection and familiarity change over time and whether there is a qualitative difference between familiar items that were previously recollected and items that have always been familiar. It might be that, when an item is initially recollected and becomes just familiar after a delay, this form of familiarity is actually a weak and partial recollection, qualitatively different from mere familiarity. To address this issue, a task have been developed in which, at study, participants encoded two series of 100 pictures representing scenes under respectively shallow and deep encoding conditions. Memory for these pictures was tested by means of a yes-no recognition test. Recognised items were classified as recollected or as familiar. Half of the pictures from each encoding condition were tested after 10 minutes and the other half were tested after 2 days. The results indicated that recollection decreased after 2 days while familiarity increased (deep encoding condition) or did not change (shallow encoding condition). This suggests that, among the items judged as familiar after 2 days, some items would have been recollected after 10 minutes and some were initially already familiar. Because deep encoding produced a higher proportion of recollection at the 10-minute interval, the proportion of recollection-changed-into-familiarity responses should be greater in this condition than in the shallow encoding condition. Whether there is a qualitative difference between these responses and pure familiarity responses should be explored in a fMRI experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailPreserved familiarity-based recognition memory in a case of global amnesia
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Charnallet, Annik et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2002), 14(Supplemental), 32

Whether recognition memory can be preserved relative to recall in global amnesia is a matter of debate. Some studies suggest that amnesic patients with selective lesion to the hippocampal circuit show a ... [more ▼]

Whether recognition memory can be preserved relative to recall in global amnesia is a matter of debate. Some studies suggest that amnesic patients with selective lesion to the hippocampal circuit show a relatively normal recognition memory in the presence of impaired recall. However, other findings did not support this assumption. We investigated the recognition memory performance of a patient (ER) who became amnesic following a carbon monoxide poisoning. The MR scan revealed bilateral lesions to the pallidum. Based on the aetiology, a hippocampal lesion is suspected, but needs to be confirmed by a volumetric analysis. The recall and recognition performance of the patient was tested by means of the nonverbal subtests of the Doors and People Test Battery, which were matched on difficulty. On these subtests, ER’s recall performance was much more impaired than his recognition memory. ER’s recognition memory performance was further examined on a yes-no and a forced-choice recognition memory task, using faces as material. On the yes-no task, ER’s hit rate was normal, but he made a lot of false alarms compared to control subjects. By contrast, his forced-choice recognition memory was completely normal. This suggests that ER is able to use the familiarity process to make recognition decisions. Familiarity and recollection were finally investigated with a recognition task using the Process Dissociation Procedure (Jacoby, 1991). On this task, ER’s familiarity score was normal, whereas his recollection score was lower. These results support the assumption that familiarity-based recognition memory can be preserved in amnesia. [less ▲]

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See detailFurther exploration of the mere exposure effect in Alzheimer's disease
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2001, March 25), Suppl. 58

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See detailAging and recognition processes
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Marczewski, Philippe

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2001), 13(Supplemental), 68

The aim of our study was twofold : to explore the effect of aging on recollection and familiarity and to compare two procedures for testing recognition (the yes-no and forced choice procedures). We ... [more ▼]

The aim of our study was twofold : to explore the effect of aging on recollection and familiarity and to compare two procedures for testing recognition (the yes-no and forced choice procedures). We administered a yes-no and a forced choice recognition task using unfamiliar faces as material to 32 young subjects (mean age: 23) and 32 older adults (mean age: 64.28). During the recognition phase, participants were asked to classify each recognised item as one that evoked a Remember response, a Know response or a Guess response. The results indicated significant age differences on global performance in the yes-no recognition task, but not in the forced choice task. Moreover, older adults gave less Remember responses and slightly more Know responses than young subjects. Our findings are consistent with previous studies indicating a reduction of recollection with aging. Concerning the contribution of recollection and familiarity to recognition as a function of the test format, participants in each age group used more Remember responses in the yes-no task than in the forced choice task and more Know responses in the forced choice than in the yes-no task. Our results seem to support the assumption that the contribution of recollection and familiarity depends on the type of testing procedure. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural substrate of orientation working memory
Cornette, Luc; Dupont, Patrick; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2001), 13(6), 813-828

We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the neural substrate of two major cognitive components of working memory (WM), maintenance and manipulation of a single elementary visual ... [more ▼]

We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the neural substrate of two major cognitive components of working memory (WM), maintenance and manipulation of a single elementary visual attribute, i.e., the orientation of a grating presented in central vision. This approach allowed us to equate difficulty across tasks and prevented subjects from using verbal strategies or vestibular cues. Maintenance of orientations involved a distributed fronto-parietal network, that is, left and right lateral superior frontal sulcus (SFSl), bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), bilateral precuneus, and right superior parietal lobe (SPL). A more medial superior frontal sulcus region (SFSm) was identified as being instrumental in the manipulative operation of updating orientations retained in the WM. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that orientation WM relies on a coordinated interaction between frontal and parietal regions. In general, the current findings confirm the distinction between maintenance and manipulative processes, highlight the functional heterogeneity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and suggest a more dynamic view of WM as a process requiring the coordinated interaction of anatomically distinct brain areas. [less ▲]

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