References of "Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology"
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See detailSpontaneous and Posed Emotional Facial Expressions Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Dethier, Marie ULg; Blairy, Sylvie ULg; Rosenberg, Hannah et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2012), 34(9), 936-947

Aim: The current study aimed to test the intensity of spontaneous emotional expressions and the accuracy of posed emotional expressions in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method: Twenty ... [more ▼]

Aim: The current study aimed to test the intensity of spontaneous emotional expressions and the accuracy of posed emotional expressions in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method: Twenty-three participants with TBI and 27 matched control participants were asked to relate personal angry, happy, and sad events (spontaneous expressivity) and to pose angry, happy, and sad expressions in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Their emotional facial expressions were coded via judges’ ratings. Results: Participants with TBI had less intense sad expressions when relating a sad event compared to control participants. No group difference emerged in the happy and angry events, the latter possibly due to differentially low inter-rater reliability for anger ratings. Participants with TBI were impaired in their ability to pose sad emotions. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest that patients with TBI are impaired at expressing sad expressions either spontaneously or deliberately. This may reflect difficulties in the initiation or suppression of facial expression as well as an impaired semantic knowledge of the facial configuration of sad expression. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations of hallucination proneness with free-recall intrusions and response bias in a non-clinical sample
Brébion, G.; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2010), 32

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See detailThe California Verbal Learning Test and other standard clinical neuropsychological tests to predict conversion from mild memory impairment to dementia.
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Marique, Patricia et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2010), 20

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See detailAttentional and executive functioning following mild traumatic brain injury in children using the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP) battery
Catale, Corinne ULg; Marique, Patrica; Closset, Annette et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2009), 31(3), 331-338

The interpretation of the data regarding cognitive outcome in children who have suffered from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) remains currently controversial. The aim of the present study is to explore ... [more ▼]

The interpretation of the data regarding cognitive outcome in children who have suffered from mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) remains currently controversial. The aim of the present study is to explore attentional and executive functioning in 6–12-year-old children who experienced a MTBI. A total of 15 children with MTBI and 15 matched noninjured children participated in the study. Attentional tasks using the Test for Attentional Performance battery were administered one year after the injury. In comparison to the noninjury children, MTBI children performed less accurately on selective attentional and updating tasks. These preliminary findings support the view that MTBI can have an impact on specific attentional functioning in children one year postinjury. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimization of encoding specificity for the diagnosis of early AD: The RI-48 task
Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Ivanoiu, A. et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2007), 29(5), 477-487

The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of the RI-48 test, a shorter French version of the Category Cued Recall portion of the Double Memory Test developed initially by Buschke and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of the RI-48 test, a shorter French version of the Category Cued Recall portion of the Double Memory Test developed initially by Buschke and colleagues (1997), in the diagnosis of mild and very mild Alzheimer disease (AD). The distinctive feature of the RI-48 task is that encoding specificity was increased by adding an immediate cued recall stage at the encoding phase. The results show that the RI-48 task seems to be well adapted to the clinical context and to have good psychometric properties, in particular a lack of a ceiling effect. Moreover, this task appears to be especially well suited for the diagnosis of both mild and very mild AD (sensitivity of 93% and 83.8%). From a more theoretical point of view, this study confirms the importance of optimizing the encoding specificity for the diagnosis of very mild AD, since the more encoding specificity is accentuated, the more discriminating power is increased for the diagnosis of very mild AD. [less ▲]

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See detailA multicomponent exploration of verbal short-term storage deficits in normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease
Peters, Frédéric; Majerus, Steve ULg; Olivier, Laurence et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2007), 29(4), 405-417

Although many studies have shown diminished performance in verbal short-term memory tasks in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), the cognitive processes responsible for this verbal short-term ... [more ▼]

Although many studies have shown diminished performance in verbal short-term memory tasks in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), the cognitive processes responsible for this verbal short-term storage (STS) impairment are still unclear for both populations. We explored verbal STS functioning in patients with AD, elderly participants, and young participants, by investigating a series of processes that could underlie STS impairments in normal elderly and AD populations. The processes we investigated were (a) the influence of lexical and sublexical language knowledge on short-term storage performance, (b) functioning of the phonological loop component via word length and phonological similarity effects, and (c) executive control processes (coordination and integration). For the AD and elderly groups, the influence of language knowledge on verbal STS performance and the functioning of the phonological loop were preserved. In contrast, the AD group showed deficits for coordination and integration processes. Our results suggest that the verbal STS deficit observed in AD patients is related to impaired executive control processes. On the other hand, language-related processes underlying passive storage capacity seem to be preserved. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the effect of action familiarity on SPTs recall performance in Alzheimer's disease
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2002), 24(8), 1057-1069

This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and ... [more ▼]

This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and verbal descriptions of actions, by controlling familiarity of actions associated to objects. The results showed that both groups performed better after SPT encoding than after verbal encoding. in all three types of recall. In addition, this SPT advantage was greater for AD patients than for NC in the object cued recall test, emphasizing AD patients' sensibility to the congruence of cues between encoding and retrieval conditions. Following verbal encoding. NC showed a better recall for less familiar actions than for highly familiar actions, whereas AD patients exhibited the opposite pattern. These results reflect that AD patients did not benefit from a distinctiveness effect at encoding for improving subsequent retrieval of verbal information, probably due to a reduced level of elaboration during encoding. However, there was no effect of action familiarity on recall performance by both groups following SPT encoding. These results suggest that memory for verbal actions and SPTs is governed by different principles. In addition. they demonstrate the robustness of the SPT effect in AD patients, who were able to improve memory performance in the SPT condition not only with highly familiar actions but also with less familiar actions. [less ▲]

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