References of "Journal of Biomechanics"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMechanobiological modeling can explain orthodontic tooth movement: three case studies.
Van Schepdael, An ULg; Vander Sloten, J.; Geris, Liesbet ULg

in Journal of Biomechanics (2013), 46(3), 470-7

Progress in medicine and higher expectation of quality of life has led to a higher demand for several dental and medical treatments. This increases the occurrence of situations in which orthodontic ... [more ▼]

Progress in medicine and higher expectation of quality of life has led to a higher demand for several dental and medical treatments. This increases the occurrence of situations in which orthodontic treatment is complicated by pathological conditions, medical therapies and drugs. Together with experiments, computer models might lead to a better understanding of the effect of pathologies and medical treatment on tooth movement. This study uses a previously presented mechanobiological model of orthodontic tooth displacement to investigate the effect of pathologies and (medical) therapies on the result of orthodontic treatment by means of three clinically relevant case studies looking at the effect of estrogen deficiency, the effect of OPG injections and the influence of fluoride intake. When less estrogen was available, the model predicted bone loss and a rise in the number of osteoclasts present at the compression side, and a faster bone resorption. These effects were also observed experimentally. Experiments disagreed on the effect of estrogen deficiency on bone formation, while the mechanobiological model predicted very little difference between the pathological and the non-pathological case at formation sites. The model predicted a decrease in tooth movement after OPG injections or fluoride intake, which was also observed in experiments. Although more experiments and model analysis is needed to quantitatively validate the mechanobiological model used in this study, its ability to conceptually describe several pathological conditions is an important measure for its validity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA bone remodelling model for long term orthodontic tooth movement.
Mengoni, Marlène ULg; D'Otreppe, Vinciane ULg; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe ULg

in Journal of Biomechanics (2012, July), 45(Supplement 1), 180

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComputer-Aided Tissue Engineering of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Laurent, Cédric ULg

in Journal of Biomechanics (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA cell based modelling framework for skeletal tissue engineering applications
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Van Liedekerke, Paul; Smeets, Bart et al

in Journal of Biomechanics (2010), 43(5), 887-892

In this study, a cell based lattice free modelling framework is proposed to study cell aggregate behaviour in bone tissue engineering applications. The model encompasses cell-to-cell and cell environment ... [more ▼]

In this study, a cell based lattice free modelling framework is proposed to study cell aggregate behaviour in bone tissue engineering applications. The model encompasses cell-to-cell and cell environment interactions such as adhesion, repulsion and drag forces. Oxygen, nutrients, waste products, growth factors and inhibitors are explicitly represented in the model influencing cellular behaviour. Furthermore, a model for cell metabolism is incorporated representing the basic enzymic reactions of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. Various types of cell death such as necrosis, apoptosis and anoikis are implemented. Finally, an explicit model of the cell cycle controls the proliferation process, taking into account the presence or absence of various metabolites, sufficient space and mechanical stress. Several examples are presented demonstrating the potential of the modelling framework. The behaviour of a synchronised cell aggregate under ideal circumstances is simulated, clearly showing the different stages of the cell cycle and the resulting growth of the aggregate. Also the difference in aggregate development under ideal (normoxic) and hypoxic conditions is simulated, showing hypoxia induced necrosis mainly in the centre of the aggregate grown under hypoxic conditions. The next step in this research will be the application of this modelling framework to specific experimental set-ups for bone tissue engineering applications. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuantitative, structural, and image-based mechanical analysis of nonunion fracture repaired by genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells
Kallai, Ilan; van Lenthe, G. Harry; Ruffoni, Davide ULg et al

in JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS (2010), 43(12), 2315-2320

Stem cell-mediated gene therapy for fracture repair, utilizes genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the induction of bone growth and is considered a promising approach in skeletal ... [more ▼]

Stem cell-mediated gene therapy for fracture repair, utilizes genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the induction of bone growth and is considered a promising approach in skeletal tissue regeneration. Previous studies have shown that murine nonunion fractures can be repaired by implanting MSCs over-expressing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Nanoindentation studies of bone tissue induced by MSCs in a radius fracture site indicated similar elastic modulus compared to intact murine bone, eight weeks post-treatment. In the present study we sought to investigate temporal changes in microarchitecture and biomechanical properties of repaired murine radius bones, following the implantation of MSCs. High-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was performed 10 and 35 weeks post MSC implantation, followed by micro-finite element (micro-FE) analysis. The results have shown that the regenerated bone tissue remodels over time, as indicated by a significant decrease in bone volume, total volume, and connectivity density combined with an increase in mineral density. In addition, the axial stiffness of limbs repaired with MSCs was 2-1.5 times higher compared to the contralateral intact limbs, at 10 and 35 weeks post-treatment. These results could be attributed to the fusion that occurred in between the ulna and radius bones. In conclusion, although MSCs induce bone formation, which exceeds the fracture site, significant remodeling of the repair callus occurs over time. In addition, limbs treated with an MSC graft demonstrated superior biomechanical properties, which could indicate the clinical benefit of future MSC application in nonunion fracture repair. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling of in vitro mesenchymal stem cell cultivation, chondrogenesis and osteogenesis
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Peiffer, Véronique; Demol, Jan et al

in Journal of Biomechanics (2008, July), 41

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailApplication of mechanoregulatory models to simulate peri-implant tissue formation in an in vivo bone chamber
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Vandamme, Katleen; Naert, Ignace et al

in Journal of Biomechanics (2008), 41(1), 145-154

Several mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation models have been proposed over the last decade. Corroboration of these models by comparison with experimental data is necessary to determine their ... [more ▼]

Several mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation models have been proposed over the last decade. Corroboration of these models by comparison with experimental data is necessary to determine their predictive power. So far, models have been applied with various success rates to different experimental set-ups investigating mainly secondary fracture heating. In this study, the mechanoregulatory models are applied to simulate the implant osseointegration process in a repeated sampling in vivo bone chamber, placed in a rabbit tibia. This bone chamber provides a mechanically isolated environment to study tissue differentiation around titanium implants loaded in a controlled manner. For the purpose of this study, bone formation around loaded cylindrical and screw-shaped implants was investigated. Histologically, no differences were found between the two implant geometries for the global amount of bone formation in the entire chamber. However, a significantly larger amount of bone-to-implant contact was observed for the screw-shaped implant compared to the cylindrical implant. In the simulations, a larger amount of bone was also predicted to be in contact with the screw-shaped implant. However, other experimental observations could not be predicted. The simulation results showed a distribution of cartilage, fibrous tissue and (im)mature bone, depending on the mechanoregulatory model that was applied. In reality, no cartilage was observed. Adaptations to the differentiation models did not lead to a better correlation between experimentally observed and numerically predicted tissue distribution patterns. The hypothesis that the existing mechanoregulatory models were able to predict the patterns of tissue formation in the in vivo bone chamber could not be fully sustained. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling of peri-implant osteogenesis by means of a fracture healing mode
Amor, Nadia; Geris, Liesbet ULg; Vander Sloten, Jos et al

in Journal of Biomechanics (2008), 41(S1), 289

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn integrated mathematical modelling framework for the study of bone fracture healing
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Vander Sloten, Jos; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

in Journal of Biomechanics (2008), 41

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMathematical modeling of bone regeneration including the angiogenic process
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Vander Sloten, Jos; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

in Journal of Biomechanics (2006), 39(S1), 411-412

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNumerical simulation of tissue differentiation around loaded titanium implants in a bone chamber.
Geris, Liesbet ULg; Andreykiv, A.; Van Oosterwyck, H. et al

in Journal of Biomechanics (2004), 37(5), 763-9

The application of a bone chamber provides a controlled environment for the study of tissue differentiation and bone adaptation. The influence of different mechanical and biological factors on the ... [more ▼]

The application of a bone chamber provides a controlled environment for the study of tissue differentiation and bone adaptation. The influence of different mechanical and biological factors on the processes can be measured experimentally. The goal of the present work is to numerically model the process of peri-implant tissue differentiation inside a bone chamber, placed in a rabbit tibia. 2D and 3D models were created of the tissue inside the chamber. A number of loading conditions, corresponding to those applied in the rabbit experiments, were simulated. Fluid velocity and maximal distortional strain were considered as the stimuli that guide the differentiation process of mesenchymal cells into fibroblasts, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Mesenchymal cells migrate through the chamber from the perforations in the chamber wall. This process is modelled by the diffusion equation. The predicted tissue phenotypes as well as the process of tissue ingrowth into the chamber show a qualitative agreement with the results of the rabbit experiments. Due to the limited number of animal experiments (four) and the observed inter-animal differences, no quantitative comparison could be made. These results however are a strong indication of the feasibility of the implemented theory to predict the mechano-regulation of the differentiation process inside the bone chamber. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)