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See detailSynuclein Membrane Association Is Regulated by the Rab3a Recycling Machinery and Presynaptic Activity.
Wislet, Sabine ULg; Chen, R; Samuel, F et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2013)

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See detailTargeting a single function of the multifunctional matrix metalloprotease MT1-MMP. Impact on lymphangiogenesis.
Ingvarsen, Signe; Porse, Astrid; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2013), sous presse

The group of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) is responsible for multiple processes of extracellular matrix remodeling in the healthy body but also for matrix and tissue destruction during cancer invasion ... [more ▼]

The group of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) is responsible for multiple processes of extracellular matrix remodeling in the healthy body but also for matrix and tissue destruction during cancer invasion and metastasis. The understanding of the contributions from each individual MMP, both in healthy and pathological events, has been complicated by the lack of specific inhibitors and the fact that some of the potent MMPs are multifunctional enzymes. These factors have also hampered the setup of therapeutic strategies targeting MMP activity. A tempting target is the membrane-associated MT1-MMP which has well-documented importance in matrix degradation but which takes part in more than one pathway in this regard. In this report, we describe the selective targeting of a single function of this enzyme by means of a specific monoclonal antibody against MT1-MMP, raised in an MT1-MMP knock-out mouse. The antibody blocks the enzyme ability to activate proMMP-2 without interfering with the collagenolytic function or the general proteolytic activity of MT1-MMP. Using this antibody, we have shown that the MT1-MMP-catalyzed activation of proMMP- 2 is involved in the outgrowth of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells in a collagen matrix in vitro, as well as in lymphatic vessel sprouting assayed ex vivo. This is the first example of the complete inactivation of a single function of a multifunctional MMP and the use of this strategy to pursue its role. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel association between vasoactive intestinal peptide and CRTH2 receptor in recruiting eosinophils: a possible biochemical mechanism for allergic eosinophilic inflammation of the airways.
EL SHAZLY, Amr ULg; Begon, Dominique ULg; KUSTERMANS, Gaëlle ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2013), 288(2), 1374-84

We explored the relation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), CRTH2, and eosinophil recruitment. It is shown that CRTH2 expression by eosinophils from allergic rhinitis (AR) patients and ... [more ▼]

We explored the relation between vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), CRTH2, and eosinophil recruitment. It is shown that CRTH2 expression by eosinophils from allergic rhinitis (AR) patients and eosinophils cell line (Eol-1 cells) was up-regulated by VIP treatment. This was functional and resulted into exaggerated migratory response of cells against PGD2. Nasal challenge of AR patients resulted into significant increase of VIP contents in nasal secretion (ELISA), and the immunohistochemical studies of allergic nasal tissues, showed significant expression of VIP in association with intense eosinophil recruitment. Biochemical assays showed that VIP-induced eosinophils chemotaxis from AR patients and Eol-1 cells, was mediated through CRTH2 receptor. Cells migration against VIP was sensitive to protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, but not to tyrosine kinase or P38 MAP-kinase inhibition, or calcium chelation. Western blot demonstrated a novel CRTH2 mediated cytosol to membrane translocation of PKC-epsilon, PKC-delta and PKA-alpha, gamma and IIalpha reg in Eol-1 cells upon stimulation with VIP. Confocal images and FACS demonstrated a strong association and co-localization between VIP peptide and CRTH2 molecules. Further, VIP induced PGD2 secretion from eosinophils. Our results demonstrate the first evidence of association between VIP and CRTH2 in recruiting eosinophils. [less ▲]

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See detailDERP6 (ELP5) and C3ORF75 (ELP6) regulate tumorigenicity and migration of melanoma cells as subunits of Elongator
Close, Pierre ULg; Gillard, Magali; Ladang, Aurélie ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012)

The Elongator complex is composed of 6 subunits (Elp1-Elp6) and promotes RNAPII transcript elongation through histone acetylation in the nucleus as well as tRNA modification in the cytoplasm. This ... [more ▼]

The Elongator complex is composed of 6 subunits (Elp1-Elp6) and promotes RNAPII transcript elongation through histone acetylation in the nucleus as well as tRNA modification in the cytoplasm. This acetyltransferase complex directly or indirectly regulates numerous biological processes ranging from exocytosis and resistance to heat shock in yeast to cell migration and neuronal differentiation in higher eukaryotes. The identity of human ELP1 through ELP4 has been reported but human ELP5 and ELP6 have remained uncharacterized. Here, we report that DERP6 (ELP5) and C3ORF75 (ELP6) encode these subunits of human Elongator. We further investigated the importance and function of these two subunits by a combination of biochemical analysis and cellular assays. Our results show that DERP6/ELP5 is required for the integrity of Elongator and directly connects ELP3 to ELP4. Importantly, the migration and tumorigenicity of melanomaderived cells are significantly decreased upon Elongator depletion through ELP1 or ELP3. Strikingly, DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6-depleted melanoma cells have similar defects, further supporting the idea that DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 are essential for Elongator function. Together, our data identify DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 as key players for migration, invasion and tumorigenicity of melanoma cells, as integral subunits of Elongator. [less ▲]

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See detailRetinoic acid receptors recognise the mouse genome through binding elements with diverse spacing and topology
Moutier, Emmanuel; Ye, Tao; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012)

Retinoic Acid Receptors (RARs) heterodimerise with Retinoid X Receptors (RXRs) and bind to RA-response elements (RAREs) in the regulatory regions of their target genes. While previous studies on limited ... [more ▼]

Retinoic Acid Receptors (RARs) heterodimerise with Retinoid X Receptors (RXRs) and bind to RA-response elements (RAREs) in the regulatory regions of their target genes. While previous studies on limited sets of RA-regulated genes have defined canonical RAREs as direct repeats of the consensus RGKTCA separated by 1, 2 or 5 nucleotides (DR1, DR2, DR5), we show that in mouse embryoid bodies or F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, RARs occupy a large repertoire of sites with DR0, DR8 and IR0 (inverted repeat 0) elements. Recombinant RAR-RXR binds these non-canonical spacings in vitro with comparable affinities to DR2 and DR5. Most DR8 elements comprise three half sites with DR2 and DR0 spacings. This specific half site organisation constitutes a previously unrecognised, but frequent signature of RAR binding elements. In functional assays, DR8 and IR0 elements act as independent RAREs, while DR0 does not. Our results reveal an unexpected diversity in the spacing and topology of binding elements for the RAR-RXR heterodimer. The differential ability of RAR-RXR bound to DR0 compared to DR2, DR5 and DR8 to mediate RA-dependent transcriptional activation indicates that half site spacing allosterically regulates RAR function. [less ▲]

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See detailADAMTS-12 metalloprotease is necessary for normal inflammatory response.
Moncada-Pazos, Angela; Obaya, Alvaro J.; Llamazares, Maria et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012), 287(47), 39554-63

ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin domains) are a family of enzymes with both proteolytic and protein interaction functions, which have been implicated in distinct pathologies ... [more ▼]

ADAMTSs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin domains) are a family of enzymes with both proteolytic and protein interaction functions, which have been implicated in distinct pathologies. In this work, we have investigated the putative role of ADAMTS-12 in inflammation by using a mouse model deficient in this metalloprotease. Control and mutant mice were subjected to different experimental conditions to induce colitis, endotoxic sepsis, and pancreatitis. We have observed that Adamts12-deficient mice exhibit more severe inflammation and a delayed recovery from these challenges compared with their wild-type littermates. These changes are accompanied by an increase in inflammatory markers including several cytokines, as assessed by microarray expression analysis and proteomic-based approaches. Interestingly, the clinical symptoms observed in Adamts12-deficient mice are also concomitant with an elevation in the number of neutrophils in affected tissues. Finally, isolation and in vitro culture of human neutrophils demonstrate that the presence of ADAMTS-12 induces neutrophil apoptosis. On the basis of these results, we propose that ADAMTS-12 is implicated in the inflammatory response by modulating normal neutrophil apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe response to copper stress in Streptomyces lividans extends beyond genes under the direct control of a Copper sensitive operon Repressor protein (CsoR)
Dwarakanath, S; Chaplin, AK; Hough, MA et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012)

A Copper sensitive operon Repressor protein has been identified in Streptomyces livdians (CsoRSl) and found to regulate copper homeostasis with attomolar affinity for Cu(I). Solution studies reveal apo ... [more ▼]

A Copper sensitive operon Repressor protein has been identified in Streptomyces livdians (CsoRSl) and found to regulate copper homeostasis with attomolar affinity for Cu(I). Solution studies reveal apo- and CuI-CsoRSl to be a tetramer assembly and a 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of apo-CsoRSl reveals that a significant conformational change is necessary to enable Cu(I) binding. In silico prediction of the CsoR regulon was confirmed in vitro (EMSA) and in vivo (RNA-seq) which highlighted that next to the csoR gene itself, the regulon consists of two Cu(I) efflux systems involving a CopZ-like copper metallochaperone protein and a CopA P1-type ATPase. While deletion of csoR has only minor effects on S. lividans development when grown under high copper concentrations, mutations of the Cu(I) ligands decrease tolerance to copper as a result of the Cu(I)-CsoR mutants failing to disengage from the DNA targets, thus inhibiting the derepression of the regulon. RNA-seq experiments carried out on samples incubated with exogenous copper and a ΔcsoR strain showed that the set of genes responding to copper stress is much wider than anticipated and largely extends beyond genes targeted by CsoR. This suggests more control levels are operating and directing other regulons in copper homeostasis beside the CsoR regulon [less ▲]

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See detailThe c-jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK)-binding Protein (JNKBP1) Acts as a Negative Regulator of NOD2 Protein Signaling by Inhibiting Its Oligomerization Process
Lecat, Aurore ULg; Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Somja, Joan ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2012), 287(35), 29213-26

NOD2 is one of the best characterized member of the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLR) family. NOD2 is able to sense muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a specific bacterial cell wall component, and to subsequently ... [more ▼]

NOD2 is one of the best characterized member of the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLR) family. NOD2 is able to sense muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a specific bacterial cell wall component, and to subsequently induce various signalling pathways leading to NF- kappaB activation and autophagy, both events contributing to an efficient innate and adaptative immune response. Interestingly, loss-of-function nod2 variants were associated with a higher susceptibility for Crohn ' s disease (CD), which highlights the physiological importance of proper regulation of NOD2 activity. We performed a biochemical screen to search for new NOD2 regulators. We identified a new NOD2 partner, c-jun N-terminal kinase binding protein 1 (JNKBP1), a scaffold protein characterized by a N-terminal WD-40 domain. JNKBP1, through its WD-40 domain, binds to NOD2 following MDP activation. This interaction attenuates NOD2-mediated NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 secretion as well as NOD2 antibacterial activity. JNKBP1 exerts its repressor effect by disturbing NOD2 oligomerization and RIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation, both steps required for downstream NOD2 signalling. We furthermore showed that JNKBP1 and NOD2 are co-expressed in the human intestinal epithelium and immune cells recruited in the lamina propria, which suggests that JNKBP1 contributes to maintain NOD2-mediated intestinal immune homeostasis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of Ser-129 Phosphorylation on Interaction of Alpha-Synuclein with Synaptic and Cellular Membranes.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Visanji, Naomi; Oschipok, Lauren et al

in Journal of Biological chemistry (2011), 286(41), 35863-73

In the healthy brain, less than 5% of α-synuclein (α-syn) is phosphorylated at serine 129 (Ser(P)-129). However, within Parkinson disease (PD) Lewy bodies, 89% of α-syn is Ser(P)-129. The effects of Ser(P ... [more ▼]

In the healthy brain, less than 5% of α-synuclein (α-syn) is phosphorylated at serine 129 (Ser(P)-129). However, within Parkinson disease (PD) Lewy bodies, 89% of α-syn is Ser(P)-129. The effects of Ser(P)-129 modification on α-syn distribution and solubility are poorly understood. As α-syn normally exists in both membrane-bound and cytosolic compartments, we examined the binding and dissociation of Ser(P)-129 α-syn and analyzed the effects of manipulating Ser(P)-129 levels on α-syn membrane interactions using synaptosomal membranes and neural precursor cells from α-syn-deficient mice or transgenic mice expressing human α-syn. We first evaluated the recovery of the Ser(P)-129 epitope following either α-syn membrane binding or dissociation. We demonstrate a rapid turnover of Ser(P)-129 during both binding to and dissociation from synaptic membranes. Although the membrane binding of WT α-syn was insensitive to modulation of Ser(P)-129 levels by multiple strategies (the use of phosphomimic S129D and nonphosphorylated S129A α-syn mutants; by enzymatic dephosphorylation of Ser(P)-129 or proteasome inhibitor-induced elevation in Ser(P)-129; or by inhibition or stable overexpression of PLK2), PD mutant Ser(P)-129 α-syn showed a preferential membrane association compared with WT Ser(P)-129 α-syn. Collectively, these data suggest that phosphorylation at Ser-129 is dynamic and that the subcellular distribution of α-syn bearing PD-linked mutations, A30P or A53T, is influenced by the phosphorylation state of Ser-129. [less ▲]

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See detailSubstrate Specificity Overlap and Interaction between Adrenoleukodystrophy Protein (ALDP/ABCD1) and Adrenoleukodystrophy-related Protein (ALDRP/ABCD2)
Genin, Emmanuelle ULg; Geillon, Flore; Gondcaille, Catherine et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286 (10)

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily D ... [more ▼]

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily D called ALDP. ALDP is supposed to function as a homodimer allowing the entry of CoA-esters of very-long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome, the unique site of their β-oxidation. ALDP deficiency can be corrected by overexpression of ALDRP, its closest homolog. However, the exact nature of the substrates transported by ALDRP and its relationships with ALDP still remain unclear. To gain insight into the function of ALDRP, we used cell models allowing the induction in a dose-dependent manner of a wild type or a mutated non-functional ALDRP-EGFP fusion protein. We explored the consequences of the changes of ALDRP expression levels on the fatty acid content (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids) in phospholipids as well as on the levels of β-oxidation of 3 suspected substrates: C26:0, C24:0, and C22:6n-3 (DHA). We found an inverse correlation between the fatty acid content of saturated (C26:0, C24:0) and monounsaturated (C26:1, C24:1) VLCFA and the expression level of ALDRP. Interestingly, we obtained a transdominant-negative effect of the inactive ALDRP-EGFP on ALDP function. This effect is due to a physical interaction between ALDRP and ALDP that we evidenced by proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation. Finally, the β-oxidation assays demonstrate a role of ALDRP in the metabolism of saturated VLCFA (redundant with that of ALDP) but also a specific involvement of ALDRP in the metabolism of DHA. [less ▲]

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See detailInnate immune responses of a scleractinian coral to vibriosis
Vidal-Dupiol, Jérémie; Ladrière, Ophélie ULg; Destoumieux-Garzon, Delphine et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011)

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See detailStepwise adaptations to low temperature as revealed by multiple mutants of a psychrophilic alpha-amylase from an Antarctic bacterium
Cipolla, Alexandre ULg; D'Amico, Salvino ULg; Barumandzadeh, Roya et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286(44), 3834838355

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See detailA specific inorganic triphosphatase from Nitrosomonas europaea: structure and catalytic mechanism
Delvaux, David ULg; Murty, Mamidana R.V.S; Gabelica, Valérie ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often ... [more ▼]

The CYTH superfamily of proteins is named after its two founding members, the CyaB adenylyl cyclase from Aeromonas hydrophila and the human 25-kDa thiamine triphosphatase. Because these proteins often form a closed β-barrel, they are also referred to as “Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes” (TTM). Functionally, they are characterized by their ability to bind triphosphorylated substrates and divalent metal ions. These proteins exist in most organisms and catalyze different reactions, depending on their origin. Here we investigate structural and catalytic properties of the recombinant TTM protein from Nitrosomonas europaea (NeuTTM), a 19-kDa protein. Crystallographic data show that it crystallizes as a dimer and that, in contrast to other TTM proteins, it has an open β-barrel structure. We demonstrate that NeuTTM is a highly specific inorganic triphosphatase, hydrolyzing tripolyphosphate (PPPi) with high catalytic efficiency in the presence of Mg2+. These data are supported by native mass spectrometry analysis showing that the enzyme binds PPPi (and Mg-PPPi) with high affinity (Kd < 1.5 μM), while it has a low affinity for ATP or thiamine triphosphate. In contrast to Aeromonas and Yersinia CyaB proteins, NeuTTM has no adenylyl cyclase activity, but it shares several properties with other enzymes of the CYTH superfamily, e.g. heat-stability, alkaline pH optimum and inhibition by Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions. We suggest a catalytic mechanism involving a catalytic dyad formed by K52 and Y28. The present data provide the first characterization of a new type of phosphohydrolase (unrelated to pyrophosphatases or exopolyphosphatases), able to hydrolyze inorganic triphosphate with high specificity. [less ▲]

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See detailAMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibition induce Ca2+-independent deposition of tight junction components at the plasma membrane.
Zhang, Lihong ULg; JOURET, François ULg; Rinehart, Jesse et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286(19), 16879-90

Extracellular Ca(2+) is essential for the development of stable epithelial tight junctions. We find that in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and glycogen ... [more ▼]

Extracellular Ca(2+) is essential for the development of stable epithelial tight junctions. We find that in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta inhibition independently induce the localization of epithelial tight junction components to the plasma membrane. The Ca(2+)-independent deposition of junctional proteins induced by AMPK activation and GSK-3beta inhibition is independent of E-cadherin. Furthermore, the nectin-afadin system is required for the deposition of tight junction components induced by AMPK activation, but it is not required for that induced by GSK-3beta inhibition. Phosphorylation studies demonstrate that afadin is a substrate for AMPK. These data demonstrate that two kinases involved in regulating cell growth and metabolism act through distinct pathways to influence the deposition of the components of epithelial tight junctions. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of the netrin-like domain of procollagen C-proteinase enhancer-1 in the control of metalloproteinase activity.
Bekhouche, M.; Kronenberg; Colige, Alain ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010), 285(21), 15950-9

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See detailThe Pax6b homeodomain is dispensable for pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation in zebrafish.
Verbruggen, Vincianne; Ek, Olivier; Georlette, Daphne et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010), 285(18), 13863-73

Pax6 is a well conserved transcription factor that contains two DNA-binding domains, a paired domain and a homeodomain, and plays a key role in the development of eye, brain, and pancreas in vertebrates ... [more ▼]

Pax6 is a well conserved transcription factor that contains two DNA-binding domains, a paired domain and a homeodomain, and plays a key role in the development of eye, brain, and pancreas in vertebrates. The recent identification of the zebrafish sunrise mutant, harboring a mutation in the pax6b homeobox and presenting eye abnormalities but no obvious pancreatic defects, raised a question about the role of pax6b in zebrafish pancreas. We show here that pax6b does play an essential role in pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation, as revealed by the phenotype of a novel zebrafish pax6b null mutant and of embryos injected with pax6b morpholinos. Pax6b-depleted embryos have almost no beta cells, a strongly reduced number of delta cells, and a significant increase of epsilon cells. Through the use of various morpholinos targeting intron-exon junctions, pax6b RNA splicing was perturbed at several sites, leading either to retention of intronic sequences or to deletion of exonic sequences in the pax6b transcript. By this strategy, we show that deletion of the Pax6b homeodomain in zebrafish embryos does not disturb pancreas development, whereas lens formation is strongly affected. These data thus provide the explanation for the lack of pancreatic defects in the sunrise pax6b mutants. In addition, partial reduction of Pax6b function in zebrafish embryos performed by injection of small amounts of pax6b morpholinos caused a clear rise in alpha cell number and in glucagon expression, emphasizing the importance of the fine tuning of the Pax6b level to its biological activity. [less ▲]

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See detailA phosphorylation switch regulates the transcriptional activation of cell cycle regulator p21 by histone deacetylase inhibitors.
Simboeck, E.; Sawicka, A.; Zupkovitz, G. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010)

Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and are therefore promising anti-cancer drugs. The CDK inhibitor p21 is activated in HDAC inhibitor treated tumor cells ... [more ▼]

Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and are therefore promising anti-cancer drugs. The CDK inhibitor p21 is activated in HDAC inhibitor treated tumor cells and its growth-inhibitory function contributes to the anti-tumorigenic effect of HDAC inhibitors. We show here that induction of p21 by trichostatin A involves MAP kinase signaling. Activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway by growth factors or stress signals results in histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation at the p21 promoter and is crucial for acetylation of the neighboring lysine 14 and recruitment of activated RNA polymerase II in response to trichostatin A treatment. In non-induced cells, the protein phosphatase PP2A is associated with the p21 gene and counteracts its activation. Induction of p21 is linked to simultaneous acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3. The dual modification mark H3S10phK14ac at the activated p21 promoter is recognized by the phospho-binding protein 14-3-3 zeta, which protects the phosphoacetylation mark from being processed by PP2A. Taken together we have revealed a crosstalk of reversible phosphorylation and acetylation signals that controls the activation of p21 by HDAC inhibitors and identify the phosphatase PP2A as chromatin-associated transcriptional repressor in mammalian cells. [less ▲]

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See detailAllosteric block of KCa2 channels by apamin
Lamy, Cédric ULg; Goodchild, Samuel J; Weatherall, Kate L et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010)

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See detailThiamine triphosphate synthesis in rat brain occurs in mitochondria and is coupled to the respiratory chain
Gangolf, Marjorie ULg; Wins, Pierre; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010), 285

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