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See detailProjectiles and the abuse of the use-wear method in a search for impact
Rots, Veerle ULg; Plisson, Hugues

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2014), 48

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See detailStudy of medieval glass fragments originating from Savona (Italy) and their relation with the glass produced in Altare
Cagno, Simone; Badano Borondi, M.; Mathis, François ULg et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2012), 39(7), 2191-2197

Altare was in the medieval and post-medieval period an important glassmaking center in the Liguria region in Northern Italy. The first historical evidence of glassmaking in Altare is dated to the twelfth ... [more ▼]

Altare was in the medieval and post-medieval period an important glassmaking center in the Liguria region in Northern Italy. The first historical evidence of glassmaking in Altare is dated to the twelfth century. In spite of that, due to the continuity of glassmaking up to the present time and the contemporaneous intensive urbanization of the territory, no medieval glass from Altare or its immediate vicinity has been analyzed up to now. In this work, glass from archaeological excavations in the center of Savona, city with close ties with the glassmaking center, was studied. Glass fragments, dated from the tenth to the sixteenth century were selected from the collections of the Archaeological Museum in Savona and non-destructively analyzed with quantitative PIXE-PIGE. The resulting compositions, compared with known glass productions of the same time and evaluated on the basis of historical documents, offer an interesting panorama on the variety of glass circulation in Liguria. [less ▲]

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See detailA study of the roman iron bars of Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer (Bouches-du-Rhône, France). A proposal for a comprehensive metallographic approach
Pagès, Gaspard ULg; Dillmann, Philippe; Fluzin, Philippe et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2011)

The aim of this paper is to contribute to enlighten the organisation on the circulation and on the manufacture of iron bars and the possible bar standardisation of a given set of artefacts in order to ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to contribute to enlighten the organisation on the circulation and on the manufacture of iron bars and the possible bar standardisation of a given set of artefacts in order to throw more light on the commercial rules during Antiquity. A set of 48 iron based metal bars made from the Roman wrecks of Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer (France) has been studied using comprehensive metallographic observations from macroscopic to microscopic scales and slag inclusion (SI) analyses. A comparison of the results allows one to distinguish different metal qualities (inclusions, pores, welding, carbon content) that may be linked to morphological types which shows the possible standardisation of this set of artefacts. Moreover, SI analyses allow to distinguish various origin for the Primary Pieces of Metal, thereby enlightening a specific organisation of the iron bar production line during the late Roman period. [less ▲]

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See detailPigments from the Middle Palaeolithic levels of Es-Skhul (Mount Carmel, Israel)
d'Errico, Francesco; Salomon, Hélène ULg; Vignaud, Colette et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2010), 37

Discovery of pigments at Middle Palaeolithic sites is of interest in the context of the ongoing debate about the tempo and mode of the emergence of modern human behaviour. Here we analyse four previously ... [more ▼]

Discovery of pigments at Middle Palaeolithic sites is of interest in the context of the ongoing debate about the tempo and mode of the emergence of modern human behaviour. Here we analyse four previously undescribed fragments of pigmental material from Es-Skhul shelter, layer B, Israel, McCown excavations, identified at the Department of Palaeontology, Natural History Museum, London. One of them is still partially embedded in the hard breccia characteristic of this layer. Inspection of breccia fragments from layer B has led to the identification of small pieces of red and orange pigmental material still enclosed in large clasts, further corroborating the attribution of the larger pieces analysed in this study to layer B. The four objects are studied using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray micro-diffraction (m-XRD), Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission Spectrometry (PIXE), and Proton-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE). The specimens display various hues of yellow, orange, red, and one of them presents a gradual variation of shade from yellow to dark orange. SEM/EDX analysis identifies two specimens (Skhul 1 and 2) as being composed of iron-rich calcium phosphate, the third (Skhul 3) of potassium-rich clay with titanium-rich iron oxide inclusions, and the fourth (Skhul 4) of pure iron oxide crystals. TEM/ EDX and m-XRD analysis demonstrate that three pieces (Skhul 1, 2 and 4) were heated to at least 300 C, a process that has partially or completely dehydrated goethite into haematite and changed their pristine yellow colour into orange or red. Skhul 3 shows no sign of heating, suggesting that its haematite content has a geological origin. The different mineral composition of the pieces suggests that they must come from a variety of sources. This implies that the associated collection strategies included the selection of materials that differed not only with respect to colour but also with respect to other physical and chemical properties. Although no formal proof exists that these lumps of pigmental material were deliberately heated, results obtained are consistent with this explanation. [less ▲]

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See detailBlind tests shed light on possibilities of interpreting prehistoric stone tool prehension and hafting
Rots, Veerle ULg; Pirnay, Louis; Pirson, Philippe et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2006), 33

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See detailEarly Evidence of Complexity in Lithic Economy: Core-axe Production, Hafting and Use at Late Middle Pleistocene site 8-B-11, Sai Island (Sudan)
Rots, Veerle ULg; Van Peer, Philip

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2006), 33(3), 360-371

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See detailMicrowear and Residue Analysis in Perspective: the contribution of ethnoarchaeological evidence
Rots, Veerle ULg; Williamson, Bonny

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2004), 31

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See detailMagnetic susceptibility applied as an age-depth-climate relative dating technique using sediments from Scladina Cave, a Late Pleistocene cave site in Belgium
Ellwood, B. B.; Harrold, F. B.; Benoist, S. L. et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2004), 31(3), 283-293

Here we demonstrate that magnetic susceptibility (MS) data from Scladina Cave, Belgium, provide a time-depth-climate relationship that is correlated to the marine oxygen isotopic record and thus yields a ... [more ▼]

Here we demonstrate that magnetic susceptibility (MS) data from Scladina Cave, Belgium, provide a time-depth-climate relationship that is correlated to the marine oxygen isotopic record and thus yields a high-resolution relative dating method for sediments recovered from many archaeological sites. This methodology will help resolve one of the major problems facing archaeologists, namely the difficulty of acquiring absolute dates with reasonable precision for the period from 40,000 to 400,000 years or so. The problem is that dating techniques applicable to most materials within this age range are subject to significant errors. Relative dating techniques.. such as magnetic secular variation or stable isotope methods, offer the potential to improve this precision. but both methods suffer from problems that make broad application to many sites impossible. However, for most archaeoloaical cave sites, MS measurements of cave sediments offers the potential for intra-site correlation and paleoclimate estimation. This is possible in protected cave environments because the MS of cave sediments results from climate processes active outside caves. which cause variations in magnetic properties of the sediments that ultimately accumulate inside caves. Once deposited, these materials are often preserved and their stratigraphy provides a time-depth-climate signal that can be identified. Therefore MS data can be used as an independent methodology, alongside conventional methods such as sedimentology and palynology, for relative age dates, and correlation within and between sites by tracing evidence of paleoclimatic change. This correlation has been used to infer an age of 90,000 +/- 7000 years for Neanderthal skeletal remains recovered from Scladina Cave, an important Middle Paleolithic archaeological site in Belgium. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSedimentary deposition rates and carbon-14: The epi-paleolithic sequence of Okuzini Cave (southwest Turkey)
Otte, Marcel ULg; López Bayón, Ignacio; Noiret, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Archaeological Science (2003), 30(3), 325-341

A series of radiocarbon dates systematically obtained from bone and charcoal samples from the stratigraphic sequence of Okuzini Cave has been analyzed in conjunction with stratigraphic and archaeological ... [more ▼]

A series of radiocarbon dates systematically obtained from bone and charcoal samples from the stratigraphic sequence of Okuzini Cave has been analyzed in conjunction with stratigraphic and archaeological data to interpret the rates and processes of deposition and human occupation of the cave during the Epipaleolithic of southwest Turkey. AMS dates obtained on the charcoal series reveal the existence of three stratigraphic gaps. Sedimentation rates for the deposits are evaluated in relation to radiometric determinations, the nature and origin of sediment accumulation, the structure of the faunal and lithic assemblages and the changing nature of human occupation of the cave. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the processes and rates of sedimentation, including the three gaps revealed by the radiometric series. One of our aims is to caution against interpretations of cultural evolution directly linked to sedimentary rates for which the variation is not immediately evident during excavation, but which requires a more critical analysis, as we have had the opportunity to do at Okuzini. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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