References of "Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The)"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpecific IgE against Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins: An independent risk factor for asthma
Bachert, C.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg; Zhang, N. et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2012), 130(2), 376-3818

Background: The role of IgE in patients with severe asthma is not fully understood. Objective: We sought to investigate whether IgE to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins might be relevant to disease ... [more ▼]

Background: The role of IgE in patients with severe asthma is not fully understood. Objective: We sought to investigate whether IgE to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins might be relevant to disease severity in adult asthmatic patients. Methods: Specific IgE antibody concentrations in serum against enterotoxins, grass pollen (GP), and house dust mite allergens and total IgE levels were measured in adult cohorts of 69 control subjects, 152 patients with nonsevere asthma, and 166 patients with severe asthma. Severe asthma was defined as inadequately controlled disease despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids plus at least 2 other controller therapies, including oral steroids. Results: Enterotoxin IgE positivity was significantly greater in patients with severe asthma (59.6%) than in healthy control subjects (13%, P < .001). Twenty-one percent of patients with severe asthma with enterotoxin IgE were considered nonatopic. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated significantly increased risks for enterotoxin IgE-positive subjects to have any asthma (OR, 7.25; 95% CI, 2.7-19.1) or severe asthma (OR, 11.09; 95% CI, 4.1-29.6) versus enterotoxin IgE-negative subjects. The presence of GP or house dust mite IgE antibodies was not associated with either significantly increased risk for asthma or severity. Oral steroid use and hospitalizations were significantly increased in patients with enterotoxin IgE and nonatopic asthma. GP IgE was associated with a higher FEV 1 percent predicted value, and enterotoxin IgE was associated with a lower FEV 1 percent predicted value. Conclusions: Staphylococcal enterotoxin IgE antibodies, but not IgE against inhalant allergens, are risk factors for asthma severity. We hypothesize that the presence of enterotoxin IgE in serum indicates the involvement of staphylococcal superantigens in the pathophysiology of patients with severe asthma. © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMepolizumab, a humanized anti-IL-5 mAb, as a treatment option for severe nasal polyposis.
Gevaert, Philippe; Van Bruaene, Nicholas; Cattaert, Tom ULg et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2011), 128(5), 989-9958

BACKGROUND: Approximately 85% of nasal polyps (NPs) in white subjects are characterized by prominent eosinophilia. IL-5 is the key driver of eosinophilic differentiation and survival. OBJECTIVE: We sought ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Approximately 85% of nasal polyps (NPs) in white subjects are characterized by prominent eosinophilia. IL-5 is the key driver of eosinophilic differentiation and survival. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting IL-5 with a humanized mAb as treatment for severe nasal polyposis. METHODS: Thirty patients with severe nasal polyposis (grade 3 or 4 or recurrent after surgery) refractory to corticosteroid therapy were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive either 2 single intravenous injections (28 days apart) of 750 mg of mepolizumab (n = 20) or placebo (n = 10). Change from baseline in NP score was assessed monthly until 1 month after the last dose (week 8). Computed tomographic scans were also performed at week 8. RESULTS: Twelve of 20 patients receiving mepolizumab had a significantly improved NP score and computed tomographic scan score compared with 1 of 10 patients receiving placebo at week 8 versus baseline. CONCLUSION: Mepolizumab achieved a statistically significant reduction in NP size for at least 1 month after dosing in 12 of 20 patients. IL-5 inhibition is a potential novel therapeutic approach in patients with severe eosinophilic nasal polyposis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPresence of IL-5 and Ige-antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxins in nasal polyps is associated with co-morbid asthma
Bachert, Claus; Zhang, Nan; Holtappels, Gabriele et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2010), 126(5), 962-968

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn utero smoke exposure and impaired response to inhaled corticosteroids in children with asthma
Cohen, Robyn T.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2010), 126(3), 491-497

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInterferon Response Factor 3 is essential for house dust mite-induced airway allergy
Marichal, Thomas ULg; Bedoret, Denis; Mesnil, Claire ULg et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2010), 126(4), 836-844

IRF3, mainly known as a central orchestrator of antiviral responses, is required for proallergic functions of dendritic cells in response to aeroallergens. Thus, this study demonstratively identifies a ... [more ▼]

IRF3, mainly known as a central orchestrator of antiviral responses, is required for proallergic functions of dendritic cells in response to aeroallergens. Thus, this study demonstratively identifies a new pathway potentially implicated in the etiology of airway allergy [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (38 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelationship between total and specific IgE in patients with asthma from Siberia
Gusareva, Elena ULg; Ogorodova, Lyudmila; Chernyak, Boris et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2008), 121(3), 781

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEotaxin polymorphisms and serum total IgE levels in children with asthma
Raby, B. A.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg; Lazarus, R. et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2006), 117(2), 298-305

BACKGROUND: Eotaxin (chemokine, CC motif, ligand; CCL11) is a potent eosinophil chemoattractant strongly implicated in the pathobiology of asthma. Genetic variation at the CCL11 locus has been correlated ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Eotaxin (chemokine, CC motif, ligand; CCL11) is a potent eosinophil chemoattractant strongly implicated in the pathobiology of asthma. Genetic variation at the CCL11 locus has been correlated with serum total IgE, blood eosinophil counts, and circulating eotaxin protein levels in several case-control asthma studies. Family-based association studies of CCL11 genetic variants have not been reported to date. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate 9 common CCL11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nuclear families ascertained through patients with asthma participating in the Childhood Asthma Management Program study. METHODS: Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping was performed by using minisequencing and probe hybridization platforms. Family-based association analysis for asthma and 4 asthma-related intermediate quantitative phenotypes was performed by using FBAT. RESULTS: One SNP, -384A>G, was associated with asthma among African American families (P = .01). CCL11 SNPs and haplotypes were not associated with asthma among white or Hispanic families. Two low-frequency alleles in strong pairwise linkage disequilibrium, -426C and IVS2+199A, were associated with lower serum total IgE levels (P = .0006 and P = .009, respectively) in white families, whereas 2 more common variants, -576C and g.4438C, were associated with higher IgE levels in African American families (P = .01-.04). Haplotype analysis in the white cohort provided additional evidence of association with serum total IgE, implicating 2 haplotypes. No single SNP or haplotype associations were observed with blood eosinophil levels, FEV(1), or airway responsiveness. CONCLUSION: These findings provide further evidence that genetic variation at the CCL11 locus is an important determinant of serum total IgE levels among patients with asthma. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDesioratadine: Safety and tolerability data in clinical practice
Borchard, U. H. J.; Daly, Adrian ULg; Plenker, A.

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2003), 111(1), 74

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCD40 engagement enhances eosinophil survival through induction of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 expression: Possible involvement in allergic inflammation.
Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Seumois, Gregory; Jaspar, Fabrice et al

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (2002), 110(3), 443-9

BACKGROUND: CD40 engagement enhances eosinophil survival, suggesting a role for this receptor in the development of eosinophilia. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether CD40 enhances eosinophil survival by ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: CD40 engagement enhances eosinophil survival, suggesting a role for this receptor in the development of eosinophilia. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether CD40 enhances eosinophil survival by inducing the expression of antiapoptotic proteins. Three members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, namely cellular (c)-IAP1, c-IAP2, and XIAP, and 2 antiapoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family, namely Bcl-x(L) and Bfl-1/A1, were investigated. METHODS: Blood and sputum were obtained from healthy subjects and atopic asthmatic patients. Blood eosinophils were isolated by means of magnetic selection. Expression of CD40, IAPs, and Bcl-2 proteins was investigated by using flow cytometry, immunoblotting, or both. CD40 stimulation was achieved with agonistic antibodies or soluble ligands. Apoptosis was assessed by staining with propidium iodide and FITC-conjugated annexin-V. c-IAP2 expression was inhibited with antisense oligonucleotides. RESULTS: Freshly isolated eosinophils from healthy and asthmatic patients did not express CD40. Conversely, eosinophils expressed CD40 spontaneously when cultured for 48 hours. At this time point, CD40 stimulation significantly delayed eosinophil apoptosis. Inhibition of eosinophil apoptosis was accompanied by induction of c-IAP2 but not c-IAP1, XIAP, Bcl-x(L), or Bfl-1/A1 expression. Antisense knockdown of c-iap2 abolished CD40-induced enhancement of eosinophil survival. Sputum cells from asthmatic patients, unlike those from healthy subjects, substantially expressed CD40 and c-IAP2. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between the percentage of eosinophils in the sputum from asthmatic patients and the sputum level of CD40 and c-IAP2 expression. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that CD40 engagement enhances eosinophil survival through induction of c-IAP2 expression and suggest a role for this mechanism in allergic inflammation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAppraisal of the validity of histamine-induced wheal and flare to predict the clinical efficacy of antihistamines.
Monroe, E. W.; Daly, Adrian ULg; Shalhoub, R. F.

in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (The) (1997), 99(2), 798-806

Antihistaminic drugs have been used successfully for many years in the treatment of allergic diseases. Second-generation antihistamines have fewer sedating side effects than first-generation agents, and ... [more ▼]

Antihistaminic drugs have been used successfully for many years in the treatment of allergic diseases. Second-generation antihistamines have fewer sedating side effects than first-generation agents, and the number of newer drugs available for clinical use is growing. Various methods have been used to assess antihistaminic activity, the most popular of which is the epicutaneous histamine-induced wheal and flare. This test relies on the ability of epicutaneously injected histamine to bring about the wheal and flare, a neurovascular response that involves reflex vasodilation (flare) and local swelling caused by plasma extravasation (wheal). Antihistamines have been compared on the basis of their ability to block the histamine-induced wheal and flare in the skin. Results of these trials have been applied to predict the global antiallergic efficacy of various antihistamines. The review has examined the reliability of suppression of the histamine wheal and flare reaction in the skin to predict an antihistamine's clinical efficacy in two common allergic diseases seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria. Although histamine is one mediator in the allergic response in the skin and nasal mucosa, many other agents are important modulators of the allergic response. In addition, the major structural and functional differences that exist between the nasal mucosa and the skin affect the type of local response. These manifest themselves as differences between the responses to antigen and histamine challenge in the skin and the nose. The allergic responses in these tissues are not simply the consequence of one chemical but are the result of a cascade of interactions among various cells and mediators. The clinical manifestations of these complex interactions obviously cannot be fully replicated by injection of one chemical mediator, histamine, into the outer layer of the skin. Studies with antihistamines have shown that certain drugs, such as cetirizine, are more suppressive than others (loratadine, terfenadine) in controlling the histamine-induced wheal and flare reaction in the skin. When the clinical efficacy of these medications is compared in clinical trials in seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria, all are equally efficacious in controlling symptoms. Although the histamine-induced wheal and flare reaction can serve as a useful clinical pharmacologic test to assess dose-response relations for an antihistamine, its lack of correlation with clinical responses among antihistamines indicates that this model should not be used to predict or compare clinical efficacies of antihistamines in seasonal allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)