References of "Human brain mapping"
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See detailEpisodic autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: What are the neural correlates?
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2013), 34

Autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) is characterized by impaired retrieval of episodic memories, but relatively preserved personal semantic knowledge. This study aimed to ... [more ▼]

Autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) is characterized by impaired retrieval of episodic memories, but relatively preserved personal semantic knowledge. This study aimed to identify (via FDG-PET) the neural substrates of impaired episodic specificity of autobiographical memories in 35 aMCI patients compared with 24 healthy elderly controls. Significant correlations between regional cerebral activity and the proportion of episodic details in autobiographical memories from two life periods were found in specific regions of an autobiographical brain network. In aMCI patients, more than in controls, specifically episodic memories from early adulthood were associated with metabolic activity in the cuneus and in parietal regions. We hypothesized that variable retrieval of episodic autobiographical memories in our aMCI patients would be related to their variable capacity to reactivate specific sensory-perceptual and contextual details of early adulthood events linked to reduced (occipito-parietal) visual imagery and less efficient (parietal) attentional processes. For recent memories (last year), a correlation emerged between the proportion of episodic details and activity in lateral temporal regions and the temporo-parietal junction. Accordingly, variable episodic memory for recent events may be related to the efficiency of controlled search through general events likely to provide cues for the retrieval of episodic details and to the ability to establish a self perspective favouring recollection. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep Spindles Predict Neural and Behavioral Changes in Motor Sequence Consolidation
Barakat, Marc; Carrier, Julie; Debas, Karen et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2012), Epub ahead of print

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See detailFrontal and posterior cingulate metabolic impairment in the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia with impaired autonoetic consciousness
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Souchay, Céline et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2012), 33

Although memory dysfunction is not a prominent feature of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD), there is evidence of specific deficits of episodic memory in these patients. They ... [more ▼]

Although memory dysfunction is not a prominent feature of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD), there is evidence of specific deficits of episodic memory in these patients. They also have problems monitoring their memory performance. The objective of the present study was to explore the ability to consciously retrieve own encoding of the context of events (autonoetic consciousness) and the ability to monitor memory performance using feeling-of-knowing (FOK) in bv-FTD. Analyses of the patients’ cerebral metabolism (FDG-PET) allowed an examination of whether impaired episodic memory in bv-FTD is associated with the frontal dysfunction characteristic of the pathology or a dysfunction of memory-specific regions pertaining to Papez’s circuit. Data were obtained from 8 bv-FTD patients and 26 healthy controls. Autonoetic consciousness was evaluated by Remember responses during the recognition memory phase of the FOK experiment. As a group, bv-FTD patients demonstrated a decline in autonoetic consciousness and FOK accuracy at the chance level. While memory monitoring was impaired in most (7) patients, 4 bv-FTD participants had individual impairment of autonoetic consciousness. They specifically showed reduced metabolism in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (near the superior frontal sulcus), parietal regions and the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings were tentatively interpreted by considering the role of the metabolically impaired brain regions in self-referential processes, suggesting that the bv-FTD patients’ problem consciously retrieving episodic memories may stem at least partly from deficient access to and maintenance/use of information about the self. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimal design for nonlinear estimation of the hemodynamic response function.
Maus, Bärbel ULg; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Goebel, Rainer et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2012), 33(6), 1253-1267

Subject-specific hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) have been recommended to capture variation in the form of the hemodynamic response between subjects (Aguirre et al., [1998]: Neuroimage 8:360–369 ... [more ▼]

Subject-specific hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) have been recommended to capture variation in the form of the hemodynamic response between subjects (Aguirre et al., [1998]: Neuroimage 8:360–369). The purpose of this article is to find optimal designs for estimation of subject-specific parameters for the double gamma HRF. As the double gamma function is a nonlinear function of its parameters, optimal design theory for nonlinear models is employed in this article. The double gamma function is linearized by a Taylor approximation and the maximin criterion is used to handle dependency of the D-optimal design on the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. A realistic range of double gamma HRF parameters is used for the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm (GA) (Kao et al., [2009]: Neuroimage 44:849–856) is applied to find locally optimal designs for the different expansion points and the maximin design chosen from the locally optimal designs is compared to maximin designs obtained by m-sequences, blocked designs, designs with constant interstimulus interval (ISI) and random event-related designs. The maximin design obtained by the GA is most efficient. Random event-related designs chosen from several generated designs and m-sequences have a high efficiency, while blocked designs and designs with a constant ISI have a low efficiency compared to the maximin GA design. [less ▲]

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See detailHemispheric specialization during mental imagery of brisk walking.
Cremers, Julien ULg; Dessoullieres, Aurélie; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg

in Human Brain Mapping (2011)

OBJECTIVES: Brisk walking, a sensitive test to evaluate gait capacity in normal and pathological aging such as parkinsonism, is used as an alternative to classical fitness program for motor rehabilitation ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Brisk walking, a sensitive test to evaluate gait capacity in normal and pathological aging such as parkinsonism, is used as an alternative to classical fitness program for motor rehabilitation and may help to decrease the risk of cognitive deterioration observed with aging. In this study, we aimed to identify brain areas normally involved in its control. METHODS: We conducted a block-design blood oxygen level dependent function magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) experiment in 18 young healthy individuals trained to imagine themselves in three main situations: brisk walking in a 25-m-long corridor, standing or lying. Imagined walking time (IWT) was measured as a control of behavioral performance during fMRI. RESULTS: The group mean IWT was not significantly different from the actual walking time measured during a training session prior to the fMRI study. Compared with other experimental conditions, mental imagery (MI) of brisk walking was associated with stronger activity in frontal and parietal regions mainly on the right, and cerebellar hemispheres, mainly on the left. Presumed imagined walking speed (2.3 +/- 0.4 m/s) was positively correlated with activity levels in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal lobule along with the vermis and the left cerebellar hemisphere. INTERPRETATIONS: A new finding in this study is that MI of brisk walking in young healthy individuals strongly involves processes lateralized in right fronto-parietal regions along with left cerebellum. These results show that brisk walking might be a non automatic locomotor activity requiring a high-level supraspinal control. Hum Brain Mapp, 2011. (c) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentifying the default-mode component in spatial IC analyses of patients with disorders of consciousness.
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2011)

Objectives:Recent fMRI studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify the default-mode network (DMN) in the absence of any task, by resting-state connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Recent fMRI studies have shown that it is possible to reliably identify the default-mode network (DMN) in the absence of any task, by resting-state connectivity analyses in healthy volunteers. We here aimed to identify the DMN in the challenging patient population of disorders of consciousness encountered following coma. Experimental design: A spatial independent component analysis-based methodology permitted DMN assessment, decomposing connectivity in all its different sources either neuronal or artifactual. Three different selection criteria were introduced assessing anticorrelation-corrected connectivity with or without an automatic masking procedure and calculating connectivity scores encompassing both spatial and temporal properties. These three methods were validated on 10 healthy controls and applied to an independent group of 8 healthy controls and 11 severely brain-damaged patients [locked-in syndrome (n = 2), minimally conscious (n = 1), and vegetative state (n = 8)]. Principal observations: All vegetative patients showed fewer connections in the default-mode areas, when compared with controls, contrary to locked-in patients who showed near-normal connectivity. In the minimally conscious-state patient, only the two selection criteria considering both spatial and temporal properties were able to identify an intact right lateralized BOLD connectivity pattern, and metabolic PET data suggested its neuronal origin. Conclusions: When assessing resting-state connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness, it is important to use a methodology excluding non-neuronal contributions caused by head motion, respiration, and heart rate artifacts encountered in all studied patients. Hum Brain Mapp, 2011. (c) 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailAnterior cingulate activity and the self in disorders of consciousness.
Qin, Pengmin; Di, Haibo; Liu, Yijun et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2010), 31(12), 1993-2002

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between medial cortical activation and the presence of self and consciousness in healthy subjects and patients with vegetative state ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between medial cortical activation and the presence of self and consciousness in healthy subjects and patients with vegetative state and minimally conscious state using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). EXPERIMENT DESIGN: We first conducted two fMRI experiments in healthy subjects to identify brain regions specifically associated with self-perception through the use of different auditory stimuli that had different grades of self-relatedness. We then applied these regions as functional localizers to examine the relationship between neural activity changes during self-relatedness and consciousness level in the patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). PRINCIPAL OBSERVATIONS: We demonstrated recruitment of various anterior medial cortical regions including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in healthy subjects during auditory perception of self-related stimuli. We further showed that patients with DOC showed signal changes in the ACC during auditory perception of self-related stimuli. Finally, it was shown that these signal changes correlate with the level of consciousness in the patients with DOC. CONCLUSION: The degree of consciousness in patients with DOC was correlated with neural activity in the ACC induced by self-related stimuli. Our results not only shed light on the pathophysiology of DOC, but may also suggest a useful neural, and thus diagnostic, marker of the dysfunction of consciousness in vegetative patients. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Iowa Gambling Task in fMRI images.
Li, Xiang ULg; Lu, Z. L.; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2010), 31

The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is a sensitive test for the detection of decision-making impairments in several neurological and psychiatric populations. Very few studies have employed the IGT in functional ... [more ▼]

The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is a sensitive test for the detection of decision-making impairments in several neurological and psychiatric populations. Very few studies have employed the IGT in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) investigations, in part, because the task is cognitively complex. Here we report a method for exploring brain activity using fMRI during performance of the IGT. Decision-making during the IGT was associated with activity in several brain regions in a group of healthy individuals. The activated regions were consistent with the neural circuitry hypothesized to underlie somatic marker activation and decision-making. Specifically, a neural circuitry involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (for working memory), the insula and posterior cingulate cortex (for representations of emotional states), the mesial orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (for coupling the two previous processes), the ventral striatum and anterior cingulate/SMA (supplementary motor area) for implementing behavioral decisions was engaged. These results have implications for using the IGT to study abnormal mechanisms of decision making in a variety of clinical populations. Hum Brain Mapp, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural substrates of phonological and lexicosemantic representations in Alzheimer's disease.
Peters, Frederic; Majerus, Steve ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2009), 30(1), 185-99

The language profile of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized not only by lexicosemantic impairments but also by phonological deficits, as shown by an increasing number of ... [more ▼]

The language profile of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized not only by lexicosemantic impairments but also by phonological deficits, as shown by an increasing number of neuropsychological studies. This study explored the functional neural correlates underlying phonological and lexicosemantic processing in AD. Using H(215)O PET functional brain imaging, a group of mild to moderate AD patients and a group of age-matched controls were asked to repeat four types of verbal stimuli: words, wordlike nonwords (WL+), non-wordlike nonwords (WL-) and simple vowels. The comparison between the different conditions allowed us to determine brain activation preferentially associated with lexicosemantic or phonological levels of language representations. When repeating words, AD patients showed decreased activity in the left temporo-parietal and inferior frontal regions relative to controls, consistent with distorted lexicosemantic representations. Brain activity was abnormally increased in the right superior temporal area during word repetition, a region more commonly associated with perceptual-phonological processing. During repetition of WL+ and WL- nonwords, AD patients showed decreased activity in the middle part of the superior temporal gyrus, presumably associated with sublexical phonological information; at the same time, AD patients showed larger activation than controls in the inferior temporal gyrus, typically associated with lexicosemantic levels of representation. Overall, the results suggest that AD patients use altered pathways to process phonological and lexicosemantic information, possibly related to a progressive loss of specialization of phonological and lexicosemantic neural networks. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional connectivity in the default network during resting state is preserved in a vegetative but not in a brain dead patient.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2009), 30(8), 2393-400

Recent studies on spontaneous fluctuations in the functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in awake healthy subjects showed the presence of coherent fluctuations among functionally ... [more ▼]

Recent studies on spontaneous fluctuations in the functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in awake healthy subjects showed the presence of coherent fluctuations among functionally defined neuroanatomical networks. However, the functional significance of these spontaneous BOLD fluctuations remains poorly understood. By means of 3 T functional MRI, we demonstrate absent cortico-thalamic BOLD functional connectivity (i.e. between posterior cingulate/precuneal cortex and medial thalamus), but preserved cortico-cortical connectivity within the default network in a case of vegetative state (VS) studied 2.5 years following cardio-respiratory arrest, as documented by extensive behavioral and paraclinical assessments. In the VS patient, as in age-matched controls, anticorrelations could also be observed between posterior cingulate/precuneus and a previously identified task-positive cortical network. Both correlations and anticorrelations were significantly reduced in VS as compared to controls. A similar approach in a brain dead patient did not show any such long-distance functional connectivity. We conclude that some slow coherent BOLD fluctuations previously identified in healthy awake human brain can be found in alive but unaware patients, and are thus unlikely to be uniquely due to ongoing modifications of conscious thoughts. Future studies are needed to give a full characterization of default network connectivity in the VS patients population. [less ▲]

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See detailConsciousness and cerebral baseline activity fluctuations
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2008), 29

The origin of within-subject variability in perceptual experiments is poorly understood. We here review evidence that baseline brain activity in the areas involved in sensory perception predict subsequent ... [more ▼]

The origin of within-subject variability in perceptual experiments is poorly understood. We here review evidence that baseline brain activity in the areas involved in sensory perception predict subsequent variations in sensory awareness. We place these findings in light of recent findings on the architecture of spontaneous BOLD fluctuations in the awake human brain, and discuss the possible origins of the observed baseline brain activity fluctuations. [less ▲]

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See detailBayesian estimation of evoked and induced responses
Friston, Kark J.; Henson, Richard; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2006), 27(9), 722-735

We describe an extension of our empirical Bayes approach to magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography (MEG/EEG) source reconstruction that covers both evoked and induced responses. The estimation ... [more ▼]

We describe an extension of our empirical Bayes approach to magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography (MEG/EEG) source reconstruction that covers both evoked and induced responses. The estimation scheme is based on classical covariance component estimation using restricted maximum likelihood (ReML). We have focused previously on the estimation of spatial covariance components under simple assumptions about the temporal correlations. Here we extend the scheme using temporal basis functions to place constraints on the temporal form of the responses. We show how the same scheme can estimate evoked responses that are phase-locked to the stimulus and induced responses that are not. For a single trial the model is exactly the same, In the context of multiple trials, however, the inherent distinction between evoked and induced responses calls for different treatments of the underlying hierarchical multitrial model. We derive the respective models and show how they can be estimated efficiently using ReML. This enables the Bayesian estimation of evoked and induced changes in power or, more generally, the energy of wavelet coefficients. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Perani, D.; Herholz, K. et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2006), 27(7), 588-597

We explored the neural substrate of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hundred nine patients with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers assessed patients ... [more ▼]

We explored the neural substrate of anosognosia for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two hundred nine patients with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers assessed patients' cognitive impairment by answering a structured questionnaire. Subjects rated 13 cognitive domains as not impaired or associated with mild, moderate, severe, or very severe difficulties, and a sum score was calculated. Two measures of anosognosia were derived. A patient's self assessment, unconfounded by objective measurements of cognitive deficits such as dementia severity and episodic memory impairment, provided an estimate of impaired self-evaluative judgment about cognition in AD. Impaired self-evaluation was related to a decrease in brain metabolism measured with 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in orbital prefrontal cortex and in medial temporal structures. In a cognitive model of anosognosia, medial temporal dysfunction might impair a comparison mechanism between current information on cognition and personal knowledge. Hypoactivity in orbitofrontal cortex may not allow AD patients to update the qualitative judgment associated with their impaired cognitive abilities. Caregivers perceived greater cognitive impairments than patients did. The discrepancy score between caregiver's and patient's evaluations, an other measure of anosognosia, was negatively related to metabolic activity located in the temporoparietal junction, consistent with an impairment of self-referential processes and perspective taking in AD. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the unity and diversity of the neural substrates of executive functioning
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2005), 25(4), 409-423

Previous studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning used task-specific analyses, which might not be the most appropriate approach due to the difficulty of precisely isolating ... [more ▼]

Previous studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning used task-specific analyses, which might not be the most appropriate approach due to the difficulty of precisely isolating executive functions. Consequently, the aim of this study was to use positron emission tomography (PET) to reexamine by conjunction and interaction paradigms the cerebral areas associated with three executive processes (updating, shifting, and inhibition). Three conjunction analyses allowed us to isolate the cerebral areas common to tasks selected to tap into the same executive process. A global conjunction analysis demonstrated that foci of activation common to all tasks were observed in the right intraparietal sulcus, the left superior parietal gyrus, and at a lower statistical threshold, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. These regions thus seem to play a general role in executive functioning. The right intraparietal sulcus seems to play a role in selective attention to relevant stimuli and in suppression of irrelevant information. The left superior parietal region is involved in amodal switching/integration processes. One hypothesis regarding the functional role of the lateral prefrontal cortex is that monitoring and temporal organization of cognitive processes are necessary to carry out ongoing tasks. Finally, interaction analyses showed that specific prefrontal cerebral areas were associated with each executive process. The results of this neuro-imaging study are in agreement with cognitive studies demonstrating that executive functioning is characterized by both unity and diversity of processes. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging a cognitive model of apraxia: The neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2004), 21(3), 119-142

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using (H2O)-O-15 PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis. of the visual analysis of gestures. First; we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture mutation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;35.63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailPhonological short-term memory networks following recovery from Landau and Kleffner syndrome
Majerus, Steve ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2003), 19(3), 133-144

Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare acquired aphasia occurring in otherwise healthy children, together with spike-wave discharges predominating over superior temporal regions and activated by sleep ... [more ▼]

Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare acquired aphasia occurring in otherwise healthy children, together with spike-wave discharges predominating over superior temporal regions and activated by sleep. Although the outcome of language abilities is variable, a residual impairment in verbal short-term memory (STM) is frequent. This STM deficit might be related to the persistent dysfunction of those temporal lobe regions where epileptic discharges were observed during the active phase of the disorder. We tested this hypothesis by measuring brain activation during immediate serial recall of lists of 4 words, compared to single word repetition, using H(2) (15)O positron emission tomography (PET), in 3 LKS patients after recovery and in 14 healthy controls. The patients (TG, JPH, and DC) had shown abnormally increased or decreased glucose metabolism in left or right superior temporal gyrus (STG) at different stages during the active phase of their disease. At the time of this study, the patients were 6-10 years from the active phase of LKS. Results showed that Patients JPH and DC had impaired performance in the STM condition, whereas TG showed near normal performance. PET data showed that JPH and DC activated significantly less than controls left and right posterior STG. TG, having near normal STM performance, showed increased activity in the posterior part of the right STG. These data suggest that impaired verbal STM at late outcome of LKS might indeed be related to a persistent decrease of activity in those posterior superior temporal gyri that were involved in the epileptic focus during the active phase. [less ▲]

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See detailStriatum forever, despite sequence learning variability : A random effect analysis of PET data
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2000), 10(4), 179-194

This PET study is concerned with the what, where, and how of implicit sequence learning. In contrast with previous studies imaging the serial reaction time (SRT) task, the sequence of successive locations ... [more ▼]

This PET study is concerned with the what, where, and how of implicit sequence learning. In contrast with previous studies imaging the serial reaction time (SRT) task, the sequence of successive locations was determined by a probabilistic finite-state grammar. The implicit acquisition of statistical relationships between serially ordered elements (i.e., what) was studied scan by scan, aiming to evidence the brain areas (i.e., where) specifically involved in the implicit processing of this core component of sequential higher-order knowledge. As behavioural results demonstrate between- and within-subjects variability in the implicit acquisition of sequential knowledge through practice, functional PET data were modelled using a random-effect model analysis (i.e., how) to account for both sources of behavioural variability. First, two mean condition images were created per subject depending on the presence or not of implicit sequential knowledge at the time of each of the 12 scans. Next, direct comparison of these mean condition images provided the brain areas involved in sequential knowledge processing. Using this approach, we have shown that the striatum is involved in more than simple pairwise associations and that it has the capacity to process higher-order knowledge. We suggest that the striatum is not only involved in the implicit automatization of serial information through prefrontal cortex-caudate nucleus networks, but also that it plays a significant role for the selection of the most appropriate responses in the context created by both the current and previous stimuli, thus contributing to better efficiency and faster response preparation in the SRT task. Hum. Brain Mapping 10:179-194, 2000. © 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailVoxel-based analysis of confounding effects of age and dementia severity on cerebral metabolism in Alzheimer's disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Degueldre, Christian ULg et al

in Human brain mapping (2000), 10(1), 39-48

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by early hippocampal lesions, but neuropathological and functional imaging studies have also demonstrated involvement of associative cortices in patients suffering ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by early hippocampal lesions, but neuropathological and functional imaging studies have also demonstrated involvement of associative cortices in patients suffering from this illness. New image-processing technologies have led to demonstration of predominant posteromedial cortical metabolic impairment in the disease. Confounding effects of both age and dementia severity on brain metabolism were assessed using categorical and correlational analyses performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping. Posterior cingulate and precuneus metabolism, assessed by positron emission tomography, was significantly correlated with age in a population of 46 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease. Metabolism in posterior cingulate and precuneus was higher in elderly than in younger patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, even when dementia severity was taken as a confounding covariate. The data suggest that the sensitivity of positron emission tomography for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is reduced in elderly cases, where less severe pathology is sufficient to induce clinical symptoms of dementia. Conversely, higher posteromedial metabolic impairment in early onset cases may reflect greater density of regional cerebral lesions or major decrease of functional afferences in a richly connected multimodal associative area. Posterior cingulate metabolism was also correlated to dementia severity, even when age was taken as a confounding covariate, whereas metabolism in the hippocampal formation was not shown to correlate with global cognitive deficit. Functional correlation was maintained between posterior cingulate and middle frontal cortex in demented patients as in elderly controls. The key role of posteromedial cortex in cognitive dysfunction assessed in Alzheimer's disease is probably related to its highly integrated position within attentional, visuospatial and memory neuronal networks. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional anatomy of verbal and visuospatial span tasks in Alzheimer's disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (1997), 5(2), 110-118

The aim of the study was to emphasize cerebral regions which subserve the performance of short-term memory tasks in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We correlated scores obtained on span tasks with ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study was to emphasize cerebral regions which subserve the performance of short-term memory tasks in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We correlated scores obtained on span tasks with cerebral metabolism measured at rest with positron emission tomography. Scores obtained on the digit span task correlated with glucose metabolism in a brain area centered on the premotor cortex and extending to the adjacent motor and parietal gyri. There exists some evidence suggesting that this area may subserve the sequential organization of material stored in short-term memory. In a secondary analysis, we also observed significant interregional correlations between left-sided brain areas which are part of the neural network subserving verbal working memory processes in healthy controls. These data suggest that individual performance on verbal span tasks in AD patients may essentially depend on the preservation of their ordination processing capacity. The absence of correlation with prefrontal regions suggests that AD patients might not spontaneously engage central executive resources to reach their maximal span score. For simultaneous visuospatial span task, the performance of patients correlated with posterior brain regions, and not with prefrontal cortices. Hum. Brain Mapping 5:110-118, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss Inc. [less ▲]

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