References of "Genome Research"
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See detailPredictive regulatory models in Drosophila melanogaster by integrative inference of transcriptional networks
Marbach, Daniel; Roy, Sushmita; Ay, Ferhat et al

in Genome research (2012), 22(7), 1334--1349

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See detailAssessing the effect of the CLPG mutation on the microRNA catalog of skeletal muscle using high-throughput sequencing.
Caiment, Florian ULg; Charlier, Carole ULg; Hadfield, Tracy et al

in Genome Research (2010), 20(12), 1651-62

The callipyge phenotype is a monogenic muscular hypertrophy that is only expressed in heterozygous sheep receiving the CLPG mutation from their sire. The wild-type phenotype of CLPG/CLPG animals is ... [more ▼]

The callipyge phenotype is a monogenic muscular hypertrophy that is only expressed in heterozygous sheep receiving the CLPG mutation from their sire. The wild-type phenotype of CLPG/CLPG animals is thought to result from translational inhibition of paternally expressed DLK1 transcripts by maternally expressed miRNAs. To identify the miRNA responsible for this trans effect, we used high-throughput sequencing to exhaustively catalog miRNAs expressed in skeletal muscle of sheep of the four CLPG genotypes. We have identified 747 miRNA species of which 110 map to the DLK1-GTL2 or callipyge domain. We demonstrate that the latter are imprinted and preferentially expressed from the maternal allele. We show that the CLPG mutation affects their level of expression in cis ( approximately 3.2-fold increase) as well as in trans ( approximately 1.8-fold increase). In CLPG/CLPG animals, miRNAs from the DLK1-GTL2 domain account for approximately 20% of miRNAs in skeletal muscle. We show that the CLPG genotype affects the levels of A-to-I editing of at least five pri-miRNAs of the DLK1-GTL2 domain, but that levels of editing of mature miRNAs are always minor. We present suggestive evidence that the miRNAs from the domain target the ORF of DLK1, thereby causing the trans inhibition underlying polar overdominance. We highlight the limitations of high-throughput sequencing for digital gene expression profiling as a result of biased and inconsistent amplification of specific miRNAs. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of the bovine pseudoautosomal boundary: Documenting the evolutionary history of mammalian sex chromosomes.
Van Laere, Anne-Sophie ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Georges, Michel ULg

in Genome Research (2008), 18(12), 1884-95

Here, we report the sequence characterization of the bovine pseudoautosomal boundary (PAB) and its neighborhood. We demonstrate that it maps to the 5' end of the GPR143 gene, which has concomitantly lost ... [more ▼]

Here, we report the sequence characterization of the bovine pseudoautosomal boundary (PAB) and its neighborhood. We demonstrate that it maps to the 5' end of the GPR143 gene, which has concomitantly lost upstream noncoding exons on the Y chromosome. We show that the bovine PAB was created approximately 20.7 million years ago by illegitimate intrachromatid recombination between inverted, ruminant-specific Bov-tA repeats. Accordingly, we demonstrate that cattle share their PAB with all other examined ruminants including sheep, but not with cetaceans or more distantly related mammals. We provide evidence that, since its creation, the ancestral ruminant PAB has been displaced by attrition, which occurs at variable rates in different species, and that it is capable of retreat by attrition erasure. We have estimated the ratio of male to female mutation rates in the Bovidae family as approximately 1.7, and we provide evidence that the mutation rate is higher in the recombining pseudoautosomal region than in the adjacent, nonrecombining gonosome-specific sequences. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman gene organization driven by the coordination of replication and transcription
Huvet, Maxime; Nicolay, Samuel ULg; Touchon, Marie et al

in Genome Research (2007), 17(9), 1278-1285

In this work, we investigated a large-scale organization of the human genes with respect to putative replication origins. We developed an appropriate multiscale method to analyze the nucleotide ... [more ▼]

In this work, we investigated a large-scale organization of the human genes with respect to putative replication origins. We developed an appropriate multiscale method to analyze the nucleotide compositional skew along the genome and found that in more than one-quarter of the genome, the skew profile presents characteristic patterns consisting of successions of N-shaped structures, designated here N-domains, bordered by putative replication origins. Our analysis of recent experimental timing data confirmed that, in a number of cases, domain borders coincide with replication initiation zones active in the early S phase, whereas the central regions replicate in the late S phase. Around the putative origins, genes are abundant and broadly expressed, and their transcription is co-oriented with replication fork progression. These features weaken progressively with the distance from putative replication origins. At the center of domains, genes are rare and expressed in few tissues. We propose that this specific organization could result from the constraints of accommodating the replication and transcription initiation processes at chromatin level, and reducing head-on collisions between the two machineries. Our findings provide a new model of gene organization in the human genome, which integrates transcription, replication, and chromatin structure as coordinated determinants of genome architecture. [less ▲]

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See detailCoping with cold: The genome of the versatile marine Antarctica bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125
Medigue, C.; Krin, E.; Pascal, G. et al

in Genome Research (2005), 15(10), 1325-1335

A considerable fraction of life develops in the sea at temperatures lower than 15 degrees C. Little is known about the adaptive features selected under those conditions. We present the analysis of the ... [more ▼]

A considerable fraction of life develops in the sea at temperatures lower than 15 degrees C. Little is known about the adaptive features selected under those conditions. We present the analysis of the genome Sequence of the fast growing Antarctica bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. We find that it copes with the increased Solubility of oxygen at low temperature by multiplying dioxygen scavenging while deleting whole pathways producing reactive oxygen species. Dioxygen-consuming lipid desaturases achieve both protection against oxygen and synthesis of lipids making the membrane fluid. A remarkable strategy for avoidance of reactive oxygen species generation is developed by A haloplanktis, with elimination of the ubiquitous molybdopterin-dependent metabolism. The A haloplanktis proteome reveals a concerted amino acid usage bias specific to psychrophiles, consistently appearing apt to accommodate asparagine, a residue prone to make proteins age. Adding to its originality, A haloplanktis further differs from its marine Counterparts with recruitment of a plasmid origin of replication for its second chromosome. [less ▲]

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See detailA benchmark for methods in reverse engineering and model discrimination: Problem formulation and solutions
Kremling, Andreas; Fischer, Sophia; Gadkar, Kapil et al

in Genome Research (2004), 14(9), 1773-1785

A benchmark problem is described for the reconstruction and analysis of biochemical networks given sampled experimental data. The growth of the organisms is described in a bioreactor in which one ... [more ▼]

A benchmark problem is described for the reconstruction and analysis of biochemical networks given sampled experimental data. The growth of the organisms is described in a bioreactor in which one substrate is fed into the reactor with a given feed rate and feed concentration. Measurements for some intracellular components are provided representing a small biochemical network. Problems of reverse engineering, parameter estimation, and identifiability are addressed. The contribution mainly focuses oil the problem of model discrimination. If two or more model variants describe the available experimental data, a new experiment must be designed to discriminate between the hypothetical models. For the problem presented, the feed rate and feed concentration of a bioreactor system are available as control inputs. To verify calculated input profiles an interactive Web site (http://www.sysbio.de/projects/benchmark/) is provided. Several solutions based oil linear and nonlinear models are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPositional candidate cloning of a QTL in dairy cattle: Identification of a missense mutation in the bovine DGAT1 gene with major effect on milk yield and composition
Grisart, B.; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Genome Research (2002), 12(2), 222-231

We recently mapped a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with a major effect on milk composition-particularly fat content-to the centromeric end of bovine chromosome 14. We subsequently exploited linkage ... [more ▼]

We recently mapped a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with a major effect on milk composition-particularly fat content-to the centromeric end of bovine chromosome 14. We subsequently exploited linkage disequilibrium to refine the map position of this QTL to a 3-cM chromosome interval bounded by microsatellite markers BULGE13 and BULGE09. We herein report the positional candidate cloning of this QTL, involving (I) the construction of a BAC contig spanning the corresponding marker interval, (2) the demonstration that a very strong candidate gene, acylCoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGATf), maps to that contig, and (3) the identification of a nonconservative K232A substitution in the DGAT1 gene with a major effect on milk fat content and other milk characteristics. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman - ovine comparative sequencing of a 250 kilobase imprinted domain encompassing the callipyge (clpg) gene and identification of six imprinted transcripts: DLK1, DAT, GTL2, PEG11, antiPEG11 and MEG8
Charlier, Carole ULg; Segers, K.; Wagenaar, D. et al

in Genome Research (2001), 11

Two ovine BAC clones and a connecting long-range PCR product, jointly spanning ∼250 kb and representing most of theMULGE5-OY3 marker interval known to contain the clpglocus, were completely sequenced. The ... [more ▼]

Two ovine BAC clones and a connecting long-range PCR product, jointly spanning ∼250 kb and representing most of theMULGE5-OY3 marker interval known to contain the clpglocus, were completely sequenced. The resulting genomic sequence was aligned with its human ortholog and extensively annotated. Six transcripts, four of which were novel, were predicted to originate from within the analyzed region and their existence confirmed experimentally: DLK1, DAT, GTL2, PEG11, antiPEG11, and MEG8. RT-PCR experiments performed on a range of tissues sampled from an 8-wk-old animal demonstrated the preferential expression of all six transcripts in skeletal muscle, which suggests that they are under control of common regulatory elements. The six transcripts were also shown to be subject to parental imprinting: DLK1, DAT, andPEG11 were shown to be paternally expressed and GTL2,antiPEG11, and MEG8 to be maternally expressed. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative sequence analysis of the imprinted Dlk1-Gtl2 locus in three mammalian species reveals highly conserved genomic elements and refines comparison with the Igf2-H19 region.
Paulsen, M.; Takada, S.; Youngson, N. A. et al

in Genome Research (2001), 11(12), 2085-94

The Dlk1-Gtl2 domain on mouse chromosome 12 contains reciprocally imprinted genes with the potential to contribute to our understanding of common features involved in imprinting control. We have sequenced ... [more ▼]

The Dlk1-Gtl2 domain on mouse chromosome 12 contains reciprocally imprinted genes with the potential to contribute to our understanding of common features involved in imprinting control. We have sequenced this conserved region in the mouse and sheep and included the human sequence in a three species comparison. This analysis resulted in a precise conservation map and identification of highly conserved sequence elements, some of which we have shown previously to be differentially methylated in the mouse. Additionally, this analysis facilitated identification of a CpG-rich tandem repeat array located approximately 13-15 kb upstream of Gtl2. Furthermore, we have identified a third imprinted transcript that overlaps with the last Dlk1 exon in the mouse. This transcript lacks a conserved open reading frame and is probably generated by cleavage of extended Dlk1 transcripts. Because Dlk1 and Gtl2 share many of the imprinting properties of the well-characterized Igf2-H19 domain, it has been proposed that the two regions may be regulated in the same way. Comparative genomic examination of the two domains indicates that although there are similarities, other features are very different, including the location of conserved CTCF-binding sites, and the level of conservation at regulatory regions. [less ▲]

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See detailExtensive Genome-Wide Linkage Disequilibrium in Cattle
Farnir, Frédéric ULg; Coppieters, Wouter ULg; Arranz, J. J. et al

in Genome Research (2000), 10(2), 220-7

A genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) map was generated using microsatellite genotypes (284 autosomal microsatellite loci) of 581 gametes sampled from the dutch black-and-white dairy cattle population ... [more ▼]

A genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) map was generated using microsatellite genotypes (284 autosomal microsatellite loci) of 581 gametes sampled from the dutch black-and-white dairy cattle population. LD was measured between all marker pairs, both syntenic and nonsyntenic. Analysis of syntenic pairs revealed surprisingly high levels of LD that, although more pronounced for closely linked marker pairs, extended over several tens of centimorgan. In addition, significant gametic associations were also shown to be very common between nonsyntenic loci. Simulations using the known genealogies of the studied sample indicate that random drift alone is likely to account for most of the observed disequilibrium. No clear evidence was obtained for a direct effect of selection ("Bulmer effect"). The observation of long range disequilibrium between syntenic loci using low-density marker maps indicates that LD mapping has the potential to be very effective in livestock populations. The frequent occurrence of gametic associations between nonsyntenic loci, however, encourages the combined use of linkage and linkage disequilibrium methods to avoid false positive results when mapping genes in livestock. [less ▲]

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See detailQtl Mapping to Qtl Cloning: Mice to the Rescue
Georges, Michel ULg

in Genome Research (1997), 7(7), 663-665

With the availability of dense, highly informative marker maps, it has recently become feasible to map genes (Quantitative Trait Loci or QTL) accounting for part of the heritability of continuously ... [more ▼]

With the availability of dense, highly informative marker maps, it has recently become feasible to map genes (Quantitative Trait Loci or QTL) accounting for part of the heritability of continuously distributed traits in experimental crosses as well as outbred populations. QTL mapping efforts have almost invariably revealed a limited number of loci with effects of a magnitude clearly departing from the predictions of the infinitesimal model (a model introduced to facilitate mathematical treatment of quantitative traits rather than to truly reflect their underlying biology). As most experimental designs would have limited detection power, which could lead to an overestimation of the identified gene effects, interpretation of results from QTL mapping studies must be viewed with caution. However, numerous independent confirmation studies leave little doubt that most quantitative traits indeed involve a limited suite of loci with major effect. This assertion seems to hold not only for QTL mapped in crosses between divergent lines, but—more importantly—for QTL segregating in outbred populations as well (for review, see Paterson 1995). Despite the sometimes unexpected magnitude of the identified QTL effects, the lack of simple correspondence between genotype and phenotype in complex trait analysis precludes the unambiguous identification of recombinant individuals. This may limit the achievable mapping resolution of QTL, posing a serious threat to the efficacy of positional (candidate) cloning for QTL considerably. QTL mapping efforts, whether performed in pedigrees or by exploiting linkage disequilibrium, are likely to leave geneticists with a portion of the genome that contains tens if not hundreds of genes and many DNA sequence polymorphisms to examine to identify the causal variant. Mutations causing monogenic inherited diseases are often destructive enough to leave little doubt about their causality. Even if the functional consequences of such mutations were less transparent, demonstration of a perfect correspondence between genotype and … [less ▲]

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See detailLivestock Genomics Comes of Age
Georges, Michel ULg; Andersson, L.

in Genome Research (1996), 6(10), 907-21

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See detailIBD mapping of recessive traits in livestock: application to map the bovine syndactyly locus to chromosome 15
Charlier, Carole ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg; Berzi, P. et al

in Genome Research (1996), 6

Twelve animals affected with syndactyly or mulefoot were sampled in the Dutch black-and-white cattle population. Analysis of the pedigree data reveal that all of these individuals traced back to a single ... [more ▼]

Twelve animals affected with syndactyly or mulefoot were sampled in the Dutch black-and-white cattle population. Analysis of the pedigree data reveal that all of these individuals traced back to a single acknowledged carrier founder individual. Between seven and nine generations separated the founder from its 12 affected descendents. The 12 affected offspring were genotyped for a battery of 213 microsatellites spanning the 29 bovine autosomes. The resulting genotypes were analyzed using a maximum likelihood approach searching for shared homozygous haplotypes among affected individuals. Three candidate regions for the syndactyly locus emerged from this initial screening. syndactyly was shown to map to one of these candidate regions on chromosome 15 by genotyping 29 additional individuals linking founder and affected offspring and performing a conventional linkage analysis with the LINKAGE programs. This study illustrates the potential of identity-by-descent mapping in livestock populations. [less ▲]

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