References of "Frontiers in Human Neuroscience"
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See detailTemporality of Features in Near-Death Experience Narratives
Martial, Charlotte ULg; Cassol, Helena ULg; Antonopoulos, Georgios ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2017)

Background: After an occurrence of a Near-Death Experience (NDE), Near- Death Experiencers (NDErs) usually report extremely rich and detailed narratives. Phenomenologically, a NDE can be described as a ... [more ▼]

Background: After an occurrence of a Near-Death Experience (NDE), Near- Death Experiencers (NDErs) usually report extremely rich and detailed narratives. Phenomenologically, a NDE can be described as a set of distinguishable features. Some authors have proposed regular patterns of NDEs, however, the actual temporality sequence of NDE core features remains a little explored area. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency distribution of these features (globally and according to the position of features in narratives) as well as the most frequently reported temporality sequences of features. Methods: We collected 154 French freely expressed written NDE narratives (i.e., Greyson NDE scale total score 7/32). A text analysis was conducted on all narratives in order to infer temporal ordering and frequency distribution of NDE features. Results: Our analyses highlighted the following most frequently reported sequence of consecutive NDE features: Out-of-Body Experience, Experiencing a tunnel, Seeing a bright light, Feeling of peace. Yet, this sequence was encountered in a very limited number of NDErs. Conclusion: These findings may suggest that NDEs temporality sequences can vary across NDErs. Exploring associations and relationships among features encountered during NDEs may complete the rigorous definition and scientific comprehension of the phenomenon. [less ▲]

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See detailThe network model of depression as a basis for new therapeutic strategies for treating major depressive disorder in Parkinson’s disease
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2016), 10(161),

The high prevalence of major depressive disorder in people with Parkinson's disease, its negative impact on health-related quality of life and the low response rate to conventional pharmacological ... [more ▼]

The high prevalence of major depressive disorder in people with Parkinson's disease, its negative impact on health-related quality of life and the low response rate to conventional pharmacological therapies call to seek innovative treatments. Here, we review the new approaches for treating major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease within the framework of the network model of depression. According to this model, major depressive disorder reflects maladaptive neuronal plasticity. Non-invasive brain stimulation using high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the prefrontal cortex has been proposed as a feasible and effective strategy with minimal risk. The neurobiological basis of its therapeutic effect may involve neuroplastic modifications in limbic and cognitive networks. However, the way this networks reorganize might be strongly influenced by the environment. To address this issue, we propose a combined strategy that includes non-invasive brain stimulation together with cognitive and behavioral interventions. [less ▲]

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See detailOn drawing a line through the spectrogram: how do we understand deficits of vocal pitch imitation?
Pfordresher, Peter; Larrouy, Pauline ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2015), 9

In recent years there has been a remarkable increase in research focusing on deficits of pitch production in singing. A critical concern has been the identification of “poor pitch singers,” which we refer ... [more ▼]

In recent years there has been a remarkable increase in research focusing on deficits of pitch production in singing. A critical concern has been the identification of “poor pitch singers,” which we refer to more generally as individuals having a “vocal pitch imitation deficit.” The present paper includes a critical assessment of the assumption that vocal pitch imitation abilities can be treated as a dichotomy. Though this practice may be useful for data analysis and may be necessary within educational practice, we argue that this approach is complicated by a series of problems. Moreover, we argue that a more informative (and less problematic) approach comes from analyzing vocal pitch imitation abilities on a continuum, referred to as effect magnitude regression, and offer examples concerning how researchers may analyze data using this approach. We also argue that the understanding of this deficit may be better served by focusing on the effects of experimental manipulations on different individuals, rather than attempt to treat values of individual measures, and isolated tasks, as absolute measures of ability. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of response to command using voluntary control of breathing in disorders of consciousness
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Lesenfants, Damien; Sela, Lee et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014), 8(1020),

BACKGROUND: Detecting signs of consciousness in patients in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS/VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS) is known to be very challenging. Plotkin et al ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Detecting signs of consciousness in patients in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS/VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS) is known to be very challenging. Plotkin et al. (2010) recently showed the possibility of using a breathing-controlled communication device in patients with locked in syndrome. We here aim to test a breathing-based "sniff controller" that could be used as an alternative diagnostic tool to evaluate response to command in severely brain damaged patients with chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). METHODS: Twenty-five DOC patients were included. Patients' resting breathing-amplitude was measured during a 5 min resting condition. Next, they were instructed to end the presentation of a music sequence by sniffing vigorously. An automated detection of changes in breathing amplitude (i.e., >1.5 SD of resting) ended the music and hence provided positive feedback to the patient. RESULTS: None of the 11 UWS/VS patients showed a sniff-based response to command. One out of 14 patients with MCS was able to willfully modulate his breathing pattern to answer the command on 16/19 trials (accuracy 84%). Interestingly, this patient failed to show any other motor response to command. DISCUSSION: We here illustrate the possible interest of using breathing-dependent response to command in the detection of residual cognition in patients with DOC after severe brain injury. [less ▲]

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See detailNear-death experiences in non-life-threatening events and coma of different etiologies.
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Jourdan, Jean-Pierre; Thonnard, Marie ULg et al

in Frontiers in human neuroscience (2014), 8(203),

BACKGROUND: Near death experiences (NDEs) are increasingly being reported as a clearly identifiable physiological and psychological reality of clinical significance. However, the definition and causes of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Near death experiences (NDEs) are increasingly being reported as a clearly identifiable physiological and psychological reality of clinical significance. However, the definition and causes of the phenomenon as well as the identification of NDE experiencers is still a matter of debate. To date, the most widely used standardized tool to identify and characterize NDEs in research is the Greyson NDE scale. Using this scale, retrospective and prospective studies have been trying to estimate their incidence in various populations but few studies have attempted to associate the experiences' intensity and content to etiology. METHODS: This retrospective investigation assessed the intensity and the most frequently recounted features of self-reported NDEs after a non-life-threatening event (i.e., "NDE-like" experience) or after a pathological coma (i.e., "real NDE") and according to the etiology of the acute brain insult. We also compared our retrospectively acquired data in anoxic coma with historical data from the published literature on prospective post-anoxic studies using the Greyson NDE scale. RESULTS: From our 190 reports who met the criteria for NDE (i.e., Greyson NDE scale total score >7/32), intensity (i.e., Greyson NDE scale total score) and content (i.e., Greyson NDE scale features) did not differ between "NDE-like" (n = 50) and "real NDE" (n = 140) groups, nor within the "real NDE" group depending on the cause of coma (anoxic/traumatic/other). The most frequently reported feature was peacefulness (89-93%). Only 2 patients (1%) recounted a negative experience. The overall NDE core features' frequencies were higher in our retrospective anoxic cohort when compared to historical published prospective data. CONCLUSIONS: It appears that "real NDEs" after coma of different etiologies are similar to "NDE-like" experiences occurring after non-life threatening events. Subjects reporting NDEs retrospectively tend to have experienced a different content compared to the prospective experiencers. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging the where and when of tic generation and resting state networks in adult Tourette patients.
Neuner, Irene; Werner, Cornelius J.; Arrubla Martinez, Jorge Andres ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014), 8

INTRODUCTION: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with the core phenomenon of tics, whose origin and temporal pattern are unclear. We investigated the When and Where of tic generation ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with the core phenomenon of tics, whose origin and temporal pattern are unclear. We investigated the When and Where of tic generation and resting state networks (RSNs) via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS: Tic-related activity and the underlying RSNs in adult TS were studied within one fMRI session. Participants were instructed to lie in the scanner and to let tics occur freely. Tic onset times, as determined by video-observance were used as regressors and added to preceding time-bins of 1 s duration each to detect prior activation. RSN were identified by independent component analysis (ICA) and correlated to disease severity by the means of dual regression. RESULTS: Two seconds before a tic, the supplementary motor area (SMA), ventral primary motor cortex, primary sensorimotor cortex and parietal operculum exhibited activation; 1 s before a tic, the anterior cingulate, putamen, insula, amygdala, cerebellum and the extrastriatal-visual cortex exhibited activation; with tic-onset, the thalamus, central operculum, primary motor and somatosensory cortices exhibited activation. Analysis of resting state data resulted in 21 components including the so-called default-mode network. Network strength in those regions in SMA of two premotor ICA maps that were also active prior to tic occurrence, correlated significantly with disease severity according to the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTTS) scores. DISCUSSION: We demonstrate that the temporal pattern of tic generation follows the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit, and that cortical structures precede subcortical activation. The analysis of spontaneous fluctuations highlights the role of cortical premotor structures. Our study corroborates the notion of TS as a network disorder in which abnormal RSN activity might contribute to the generation of tics in SMA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Mental Whiteboard Hypothesis on Serial Order in Working Memory
Abrahamse, Elger; Van Dijck, Jean-Philippe; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014), 8

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See detailThe neural bases of proactive and reactive control processes in normal aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailFunctional connectivity and recognition of familiar faces in Alzheimer’s disease
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailExploration of unitization processes in episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailLooking for the self in pathological unconsciousness.
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2013), 7

There is an intimate relationship between consciousness and the notion of self. By studying patients with disorders of consciousness, we are offered with a unique lesion approach to tackle the neural ... [more ▼]

There is an intimate relationship between consciousness and the notion of self. By studying patients with disorders of consciousness, we are offered with a unique lesion approach to tackle the neural correlates of self in the absence of subjective reports. Studies employing neuroimaging techniques point to the critical involvement of midline anterior and posterior cortices in response to the passive presentation of self-referential stimuli, such as the patient’s own name and own face. Also, resting state studies show that these midline regions are severely impaired as a function of the level of consciousness. Theoretical frameworks combining all this progress surpass the functional localization of self-related cognition and suggest a dynamic system-level approach to the phenomenological complexity of subjectivity. Importantly for non-communicating patients suffering from disorders of consciousness, the clinical translation of these technologies will allow medical professionals and families to better comprehend these disorders and plan efficient medical management for these patients. [less ▲]

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See detailLanguage repetition and short-term memory : an integrative framework
Majerus, Steve ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2013), 7(357),

Short-term maintenance of verbal information is a core factor of language repetition, especially when reproducing multiple or unfamiliar stimuli. Many models of language processing locate the verbal short ... [more ▼]

Short-term maintenance of verbal information is a core factor of language repetition, especially when reproducing multiple or unfamiliar stimuli. Many models of language processing locate the verbal short-term maintenance function in the left posterior superior temporo-parietal area and its connections with the inferior frontal gyrus. However, research in the field of short-term memory has implicated bilateral fronto-parietal networks, involved in attention and serial order processing, as being critical for the maintenance and reproduction of verbal sequences. We present here an integrative framework aimed at bridging research in the language processing and short-term memory fields. This framework considers verbal short-term maintenance as an emergent function resulting from synchronized and integrated activation in dorsal and ventral language processing networks as well as fronto-parietal attention and serial order processing networks. To-be-maintained item representations are temporarily activated in the dorsal and ventral language processing networks, novel phoneme and word serial order information is proposed to be maintained via a right fronto-parietal serial order processing network, and activation in these different networks is proposed to be coordinated and maintained via a left fronto-parietal attention processing network. This framework provides new perspectives for our understanding of information maintenance at the nonword-, word- and sentence-level as well as of verbal maintenance deficits in case of brain injury. [less ▲]

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See detailStop, look and listen: The need for philosophical phenomenological perspectives on auditory verbal hallucinations
McCarthy-Jones, S; Krueger, J; Laroi, Frank ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2013), 7

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See detailOn the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in self-processing: the valuation hypothesis
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2013), 7

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See detailDoes processing speed protect from age-related decline in cognitive control?
Manard, Marine ULg; Carabin, Delphine; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012, October 27)

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential ... [more ▼]

Age-related difficulties have been reported on proactive control whereas reactive control seems to remain intact (Braver, Gray, & Burgess, 2007; Braver, 2012). This study investigated the potential influence of speed of processing abilities on the age-related decline in proactive control. We used a working memory recognition paradigm involving proactive or reactive cognitive control by manipulating the interference level across items. 80 young adults (18-29 years old) and 80 healthy older adults (60-89 years old) were included. The main results revealed significant effects of age on sensitivity to interference. As expected, reactive control performance remained intact with aging (similar interference effect in the two groups). In contrast, we observed a larger interference effect in the proactive condition in aging. Finally, when the groups are matched according to their processing speed (assessed by the Code task of the WAIS III, with both younger and older adults having a score comprised between 60 and 93), the effect of age on sensitivity to interference disappeared. In other words, when younger and older adults had similar speed of processing abilities, no age-related proactive control decline was observed. In conclusion, beyond the fact that this study confirms the selective age-related decline in proactive control, it also indicates that speed of processing, a measure considered as reflecting the integrity of cognitive functioning during aging (Salthouse, 1996), influences the efficiency of proactive control in that population. [less ▲]

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See detailAnodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the visual cortex as a preventive treatment of migraine: a proof-of-concept study.
Sasso d'Elia, Tullia; Vigano, Alessandro; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012, September)

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See detailBrain mechanisms underlying automatic and unconscious control of motor action
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; GARRAUX, Gaëtan ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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