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See detailEffect of Pear, Apple and Date Fibres from Cooked Fruit By-products on Dough Performance and Bread Quality
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg; Paquot, Michel ULg et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2013)

Abstract This study examined the effect of the incorporation of flesh fibre concentrate (FFC) from apple, pear, and date pomaces on wheat bread dough performance and bread quality. The nutritional ... [more ▼]

Abstract This study examined the effect of the incorporation of flesh fibre concentrate (FFC) from apple, pear, and date pomaces on wheat bread dough performance and bread quality. The nutritional composition and techno-functional properties (water-holding capacity, oil-holding capacity, swelling capacity) of FFC were determined beforehand. Dough performance was evaluated by farinograph, alveograph and visco-amylograph. Bread quality was assessed by physical (weight, specific volume, and color) and textural (hardness and elasticity) parameters. Digital imaging analysis was also performed in order to better understand the observed effects. Results showed that the addition of FFC in wheat flour significantly improved (P<0.05) dough properties inducing an increase of water absorption (from 55 to 60 %), of stability (from 4 to 31 min),of tenacity (from 83 to 116 mmH2O) , a reduction of extensibility (from 69 to 29 mm), of softening (from 60 to 20 BU), of breakdown (from 34 to 25 BU) and of setback (from 103 to 93 BU) in comparison to the control dough (without fibre). The formulation containing FFC produced loaves that had various colors (crust, 0<ΔE*<10 and crumb, 0<ΔE*<20;ΔE* corresponding to color variation), a comparable specific volume (2.7 vs 2.9 cm3/g for control) and a more aerated internal crumb structure compared to the control. During storage of breads at 20 °C, there was no significant difference [less ▲]

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See detailInterfacial and Foaming Properties of Two Types of Total Proteose-Peptone Fractions
Karamoko, Gaoussou ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Olive, Gilles ULg et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2013), 6(8), 1944-1952

Total proteose-peptone (TPP) fractions were extracted from skimmed milk (UHT) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) on a laboratory scale. Protein solutions (0.1 %, 0.5 %, and 1 % w/w) were characterized as ... [more ▼]

Total proteose-peptone (TPP) fractions were extracted from skimmed milk (UHT) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) on a laboratory scale. Protein solutions (0.1 %, 0.5 %, and 1 % w/w) were characterized as function of pH: 4.0, 4.6–4.7 (native pH), and 7.0. Their foaming capacities and stabilities were studied. Beforehand, the surface properties that govern them were investigated, notably the kinetics of adsorption and mechanical properties of monolayer films at the air–water interface involved in the formation and the stability of foams respectively. The TPP extracted from skimmed milk showed the lowest values as well as a significant reduction in surface tension and presented a good mechanically resistant film. The TPP extracted from WPC presented a better foaming capacity and stability which was unexpected. However, foaming properties and surface properties of TPP fractions depended on the pH. The considerable influence of extraction source and method on proteosepeptone’s properties were highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Processing on the Compositions and Physicochemical Properties of Fibre Concentrate from Cooked Fruit Pomaces
Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg; Bchir, Brahim ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2013)

This study examined the influence of applied tech- nologies namely desugaring, grinding, and bleaching on the compositions (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignins, and pectins), physicochemical properties ... [more ▼]

This study examined the influence of applied tech- nologies namely desugaring, grinding, and bleaching on the compositions (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignins, and pectins), physicochemical properties (water-holding capacity (WHC), swelling capacity (SWC), oil-holding capacity (OHC)) and the colour of dietary fibre (DF) during the production of fibre concentrates from unusual cooked apple and pear pomaces. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and optical microscopy were also performed to monitor process-induced modifica- tion. All the processing conditions affected the compositions and physicochemical properties of DF. The bleaching treat- ment induced the greatest changes on DF producing yellow cellulose-rich fibre concentrates with improved WHC from 3.2 to 10.0 g/g and improved SWC from 4.0 to 8.8 ml/g. Otherwise, reduction of the particle size influenced hydration properties and colours of DF. WHC and SWC tended to increase with the particle size whereas smaller granulometric size increased the lightness of fibres. Desugaring increased the DF content in both pomaces by 1.2-fold with slight modifica- tion of apple insoluble dietary fibre ratio. Fibre concentrates had improved WHC and SWC up to 1.4-fold. All processes had no significant effect (p < 0.05) on OHC of DF except with ultrafine apple fibre concentrates. Results showed that pro- cessing had overall positive effects on DF contents and hy- dration properties of pomaces from cooked fruits. Bleached fibre concentrates from apple pomace had the highest WHC (10.0 g/g) whereas that of pear had the highest fibre content (89.9 %). Fibres from cooked fruit pomaces may therefore be used as textural ingredients or functional foods. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative study of thermal and structural behaviour of four industrial lauric fats
Anihouvi, Prudent; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Dombrée, A et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2013), 6(12), 3381-3391

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See detailInfluence of oven-drying temperature on physico-chemical and functional properties of date fibre concentrates
Borchani, C.; Besbes, S.; Masmoudi, M. et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2011)

Agri-food by-products rich in dietary fibres may be used as feeds and health foods. Owing to its high fibre content, date flesh could be useful in human nutrition. It is interesting to study the influence ... [more ▼]

Agri-food by-products rich in dietary fibres may be used as feeds and health foods. Owing to its high fibre content, date flesh could be useful in human nutrition. It is interesting to study the influence of oven-drying temperatures of date fibre concentrates (DFC) on their physicochemical and functional properties for possible use as a potential fibre source in the enrichment of food. DFC from 11 Tunisian date cultivars were dried at different temperatures (40, 50 and 60 °C) and analysed regarding proximate composition (moisture, ash, protein and lipids), physicochemical (water activity (aw), pH) and functional properties (water holding capacity (WHC), swelling capacity (SC), oil holding capacity (OHC) and emulsifying capacity (EC)). DFC dried at different temperatures showed interesting functional characteristics such as hydration properties, high OHC (2.73–4.60 g oil/g dry fibre) and EC (5.93–12.87%) values. Although drying temperatures promoted little modifications affecting the physicochemical properties of DFC, significant decreases in WHC, SC and EC of DFC were noticed at the highest temperature (60 °C) for most of the date varieties. The observed influence of drying temperature on functional DFC properties calls for the use of low temperature in order to obtain DFC as suitable food ingredient. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of Air-Drying Conditions on Physico-chemical Properties of Osmotically Pre-treated Pomegranate Seeds
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Besbes, Souhail; Karoui, Romdhane et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2010)

The drying of pomegranate seeds was investigated <br />at 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C with air velocity of 2 m/s. <br />Prior to drying, seeds were osmodehydrated in 55 °Brix <br />sucrose solution for 20 min ... [more ▼]

The drying of pomegranate seeds was investigated <br />at 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C with air velocity of 2 m/s. <br />Prior to drying, seeds were osmodehydrated in 55 °Brix <br />sucrose solution for 20 min at 50 °C. The drying kinetics <br />and the effects of osmotic dehydration (OD) and air-drying <br />temperature on antioxidant capacity, total phenolics, colour <br />and texture were determined. Analysis of variance revealed <br />that OD and air-drying temperature have a significant <br />influence on the quality of seeds. Both anthocyanin and <br />total phenolic contents decreased when air-drying temperature <br />increased. The radical diphenylpicril-hydrazyl activity <br />showed the lowest antioxidant activity at 60 °C. Both <br />chromatic parameters (L*, C* and h°) and browning index <br />were affected by drying temperatures, which contributed to <br />the discolouring of seeds. The final product has 22%, 20% <br />and 16% of moisture; 0.630, 0.478 and 0.414 of aw; 151, <br />141 and 134 mg gallic acid equivalent/100 g fresh matter <br />(FM) of total phenolics; 40, 24, 20 mg/100 g FM of <br />anthocyanins and 46%, 39% and 31% of antioxidant <br />activity, for drying temperatures of 40 °C, 50 °C and <br />60 °C, respectively. In view of these results, the temperature <br />of 40 °C is recommended as it has the lowest impact on <br />the quality parameters of the seeds. Differential scanning <br />calorimetry data provided complementary information on <br />the mobility changes of water during drying. Glass <br />transition temperature (Tg′) depends on moisture content <br />and as consequence, on drying conditions. In fact, Tg′ of <br />seeds dried at 60 °C (Tg′=−21 °C) was higher than those <br />dried at 50 °C (Tg′=−28 °C) or 40 °C (Tg′=−31 °C) and <br />osmodehydrated seeds (Tg′=−34 °C). During OD and <br />drying process, the texture of seeds changed. The thickness <br />of seeds shrank by 55% at 60 °C. [less ▲]

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See detailOsmotic Dehydration Kinetics of Pomegranate Seeds Using Date Juice as an Immersion Solution Base
Bchir, Brahim ULg; Besbes, Souhail; Karoui, Romdhane et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2010)

Pomegranate seeds were osmodehydrated using date juice added with sucrose (final °Brix, 55) as immersion solution. The kinetics of osmotic dehydration showed that the most significant changes of mass ... [more ▼]

Pomegranate seeds were osmodehydrated using date juice added with sucrose (final °Brix, 55) as immersion solution. The kinetics of osmotic dehydration showed that the most significant changes of mass transfer took place during the first 20 min of the process, regardless of date juice <br />varieties. During this time, seed water loss and solid gain were estimated to be ∼39% and ∼6%, respectively. After 20 min of the process, the percentage of water loss and solid gain varied slightly and ranged on average close to ∼40% and ∼9%, respectively. During osmotic dehydration, there was a leaching <br />of natural solutes from seeds into the solution, which is <br />quantitatively not negligible, and might have an important <br />impact on the sensorial and nutritional value of seeds and date <br />juices. Both scanning electron microscopy and texture <br />(compression) analysis revealed that osmotic dehydration <br />process induced modifications of seed texture and cell <br />structure. Sucrose was found to be the essential element which <br />influences the texture of seed and the viscosity of date juice. <br />Additionally, natural sugar present in date juice permits <br />substituting 35% of the total quantity of sucrose added to the <br />osmotic solution. [less ▲]

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