References of "Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment"
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See detailEffect of fuel and kiln type on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in smoked shrimp, a Beninese food condiment
Kpoclou, Euloge; Anihouvi, Victor; Azokpota, Paulin et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2014), 31(7), 1212-1218

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See detailEffect of fuel and kiln type on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in smoked shrimp, a Beninese food condiment
Kpoclou, Euloge; Anihouvi, Victor; Azokpota, Paulin et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2014), 31(7), 1212-1218

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (14 ULg)
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See detailEffect of fuel and kiln type on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in smoked shrimp, a Beninese food condiment
Kpoclou, Euloge; Anihouvi, Victor; Azokpota, Paulin et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2014), 31(7), 1212-1218

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See detailRisk ranking priority of carcinogenic and/or genotoxic environmental contaminants in food in Belgium
Vromman, V; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy ULg; Vleminckx, C et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2014)

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See detailPreliminary assessment of the risk linked to furan ingestion by babies consuming only ready-to-eat food
Scholl, Georges ULg; Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2013), 30(4), 654-659

The risk linked to furan ingestion has been assessed in previous papers for Belgian adults and children (Scholl et al., 2012b; Scholl et al., 2012c). The present paper focuses on infants consuming only ... [more ▼]

The risk linked to furan ingestion has been assessed in previous papers for Belgian adults and children (Scholl et al., 2012b; Scholl et al., 2012c). The present paper focuses on infants consuming only ready-to-eat baby food. As there is no Belgian baby dietary database, the furan exposure assessment was carried out by using Italian infant consumption database and Belgian contamination data. The estimated daily intake (EDI) was calculated according to a deterministic methodology. It involved 42 commercially available ready-to-eat baby food and 36 baby consumption records. The mean EDI was 1,460 ng * (kgb.w.*day)-1 which is 3.8 times higher than the 381 ng * (kgb.w.*day)-1 reported for Belgian adults, and 3.5 times higher than the 419 ng * (kgb.w. * day)-1 measured for Belgian children. To assess and characterize the risk for babies exposure the Margin of Exposure (MoE) was calculated. It highlighted that 74% of infants have a MoE below 1,000, with a minimum of 140. However, these are only preliminary results as they were calculated from a very small dataset and the infant cytochrome P450 activity is significantly different compared to the adult. Therefore, the risk linked to furan ingestion by babies should be assessed in a different manner. To this end, additional data regarding a baby diet as well as a better understanding of furan toxicity for babies are needed to characterize more accurately the risk for infants. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of furan contamination across the Belgian food chain.
Scholl, Georges ULg; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2012), 29(2), 172-9

This paper provides an estimate of the furan content of Belgian foods. The objective of the study was to achieve the best food chain coverage with a restricted number of samples (n = 496). The geographic ... [more ▼]

This paper provides an estimate of the furan content of Belgian foods. The objective of the study was to achieve the best food chain coverage with a restricted number of samples (n = 496). The geographic distribution, different market chains and labels, and consumption frequencies were taken into account in the construction of the sampling plan. Weighting factors such as contamination levels, consumption frequency and the diversity of food items were applied to set up the model. The very low detection capabilities (CC(beta)) of the analytical methods used (sub-ppb) allowed reporting of 78.2% of the overall dataset above CC(beta) and, in particular, 96.7% for the baby food category. The highest furan levels were found in powdered roasted bean coffee (1912 microg kg(-1)) with a mean of 756 microg kg(-1) for this category. Prepared meat, pasta and rice, breakfast cereals, soups, and baby food also showed high mean furan contents ranging from 16 to 43 microg kg(-1). Comparisons with contamination surveys carried out in other countries pointed out differences for the same food group and therefore contamination levels are related to the geographical origin of food items. [less ▲]

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See detailCadmium in the food chain near non-ferrous metal production sites.
Vromman, V.; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Pussemier, L. et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2008), 25(3), 293-301

Dietary cadmium (Cd) exposure was estimated for adults living in Cd-contaminated areas close to non-ferrous metal plants and compared with dietary Cd exposure in the general Belgian adult population. To ... [more ▼]

Dietary cadmium (Cd) exposure was estimated for adults living in Cd-contaminated areas close to non-ferrous metal plants and compared with dietary Cd exposure in the general Belgian adult population. To evaluate the contamination levels of locally produced food items, 35 fruit samples, 97 vegetable samples, 98 samples of potatoes and 53 samples of meat, liver and kidney of cattle, which had resided for more than 18 months in the contaminated area, were analyzed for Cd. Mean Cd concentrations in fruit and vegetables were 1.1- to 9-fold higher than in samples from other regions at ambient Cd levels. Mean Cd concentrations in bovine meat, liver and kidney were 2-fold higher compared to samples from animals in other regions of Belgium. The estimated dietary intake was 31.3 and 63.3 microg day(-1) for average and large consumers, respectively, in the contaminated area, compared to 17 and 38.3 microg day(-1), respectively, for the general adult population. Excessive consumption of locally produced food items in areas close to non-ferrous metal plants could result in Cd intake levels exceeding the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI). [less ▲]

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