References of "Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions"
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See detailThe CphAII protein from Aquifex aeolicus exhibits a metal-dependent phosphodiesterase activity
Kupper, Michaël; Bauvois, Cédric; Frère, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (2012), 16(1)

The CphAII protein from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus shows the five conserved motifs of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily and presents 28% identity with the Aeromonas hydrophila subclass ... [more ▼]

The CphAII protein from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus shows the five conserved motifs of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily and presents 28% identity with the Aeromonas hydrophila subclass B2 CphA MBL. The gene encoding CphAII was amplified by PCR from the A. aeolicus genomic DNA and overexpressed in Escherichia coli using a pLex-based expression system. The recombinant CphAII protein was purified by a combination of heating (to denature E. coli proteins) and two steps of immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme preparation did not exhibit a β-lactamase activity but showed a metal-dependent phosphodiesterase activity versus bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and thymidine 5'-monophosphate p-nitrophenyl ester, with an optimum at 85°C. The circular dichroism spectrum was in agreement with the percentage of secondary structures characteristic of the MBL αββα fold. [less ▲]

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See detailIs there a cold shock response in the Antarctic psychrophile Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis?
Piette, Florence ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (2012), 16

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See detailSelection of a cold-adapted bacterium for bioremediation of wastewater at low temperatures
Gratia, E.; Weekers, F.; Margesin, R. et al

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (2009), 13(5), 763-8

Amongst more than 1000 isolates collected in various cold environments, the strain Arthrobacter psychrolactophilus Sp 31.3 has been selected for its ability to grow and to produce exoenzymes at low ... [more ▼]

Amongst more than 1000 isolates collected in various cold environments, the strain Arthrobacter psychrolactophilus Sp 31.3 has been selected for its ability to grow and to produce exoenzymes at low temperatures, its inability to grow at 37 degrees C, its non-halophilic character and its growth versatility on various media. This non-pathogenic strain displays a strong resistance to desiccation and storage at room temperature and is suitable for the production of freeze-dried bacterial starters. When grown in a synthetic wastewater at 10 degrees C, the strain induces a complete clarification of the turbid medium and efficiently hydrolyses proteins, starch and lipids in the broth. Furthermore, this strain has a remarkable capacity to improve the biodegradability of organic compounds in wastewater as indicated by a BOD(5)/COD ratio of 0.7. [less ▲]

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See detailIntrinsic halotolerance of the psychrophilic alpha-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis
Srimathi, S.; Jayaraman, G.; Feller, Georges ULg et al

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (2007), 11(3), 505-515

The halotolerance of a cold adapted alpha-amylase from the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (AHA) was investigated. AHA exhibited hydrolytic activity over a broad range of NaCl ... [more ▼]

The halotolerance of a cold adapted alpha-amylase from the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (AHA) was investigated. AHA exhibited hydrolytic activity over a broad range of NaCl concentrations (0.01-4.5 M). AHA showed 28% increased activity in 0.5-2.0 M NaCl compared to that in 0.01 M NaCl. In contrast, the corresponding mesophilic (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) and thermostable (B. licheniformis) alpha-amylases showed a 39 and 46% decrease in activity respectively. Even at 4.5 M NaCl, 80% of the initial activity was detected for AHA, whereas the mesophilic and thermostable enzymes were inactive. Besides an unaltered fluorescence emission and secondary structure, a 10 degrees C positive shift in the temperature optimum, a stabilization factor of > 5 for thermal inactivation and a Delta T-m of 8.3 degrees C for the secondary structure melting were estimated in 2.7 M NaCl. The higher activation energy, half-life time and T-m indicated reduced conformational dynamics and increased rigidity in the presence of higher NaCl concentrations. A comparison with the sequences of other halophilic alpha-amylases revealed that AHA also contains higher proportion of small hydrophobic residues and acidic residues resulting in a higher negative surface potential. Thus, with some compromise in cold activity, psychrophilic adaptation has also manifested halotolerance to AHA that is comparable to the halophilic enzymes. [less ▲]

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See detailLife at low temperatures: is disorder the driving force?
Feller, Georges ULg

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (2007), 11(2), 211-216

The thermodynamic characterization of various biological systems from psychrophiles points to a larger entropic contribution when compared to the corresponding mesophilic or (hyper) thermophilic ... [more ▼]

The thermodynamic characterization of various biological systems from psychrophiles points to a larger entropic contribution when compared to the corresponding mesophilic or (hyper) thermophilic counterparts, either at the level of the macromolecules (thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities) or of their function (ligand binding, catalytic activity). It is suggested here that in an environment characterized by a low heat content (enthalpy) and at temperatures that strongly slowdown molecular motions, the cold-adapted biological systems rely on a larger disorder to maintain macromolecular dynamics and function. Such pre-eminent involvement of entropy is observed in the experimental results and, from a macroscopic point of view, is also reflected for instance by the steric hindrances introduced by cis-unsaturated and branched lipids to maintain membrane fluidity, by the loose conformation of psychrophilic proteins or by the local destabilization of tRNA by dihydrouridine in psychrophilic bacteria. [less ▲]

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See detailDid Psychrophilic Enzymes Really Win the Challenge?
Zecchinon, Laurent ULg; Claverie, P.; Collins, T. et al

in Extremophiles : Life Under Extreme Conditions (2001), 5(5), 313-21

Organisms living in permanently cold environments, which actually represent the greatest proportion of our planet, display at low temperatures metabolic fluxes comparable to those exhibited by mesophilic ... [more ▼]

Organisms living in permanently cold environments, which actually represent the greatest proportion of our planet, display at low temperatures metabolic fluxes comparable to those exhibited by mesophilic organisms at moderate temperatures. They produce cold-evolved enzymes partially able to cope with the reduction in chemical reaction rates and the increased viscosity of the medium induced by low temperatures. In most cases, the adaptation is achieved through a reduction in the activation energy, leading to a high catalytic efficiency, which possibly originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of or the overall protein structure. This enhanced plasticity seems in return to be responsible for the weak thermal stability of cold enzymes. These particular properties render cold enzymes particularly useful in investigating the possible relationships existing between stability, flexibility, and specific activity and make them potentially unrivaled for numerous biotechnological tasks. In most cases, however, the adaptation appears to be far from being fully achieved. [less ▲]

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