References of "European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery : The Official Journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Novel Strategy to Translate the Biomechanical Rupture Risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms to their Equivalent Diameter Risk: Method and Retrospective Validation.
Gasser, T. C.; Nchimi, A.; Swedenborg, J. et al

in European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (2014)

OBJECTIVE: To translate the individual abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patient's biomechanical rupture risk profile to risk-equivalent diameters, and to retrospectively test their predictability in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To translate the individual abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patient's biomechanical rupture risk profile to risk-equivalent diameters, and to retrospectively test their predictability in ruptured and non-ruptured aneurysms. METHODS: Biomechanical parameters of ruptured and non-ruptured AAAs were retrospectively evaluated in a multicenter study. General patient data and high resolution computer tomography angiography (CTA) images from 203 non-ruptured and 40 ruptured aneurysmal infrarenal aortas. Three-dimensional AAA geometries were semi-automatically derived from CTA images. Finite element (FE) models were used to predict peak wall stress (PWS) and peak wall rupture index (PWRI) according to the individual anatomy, gender, blood pressure, intra-luminal thrombus (ILT) morphology, and relative aneurysm expansion. Average PWS diameter and PWRI diameter responses were evaluated, which allowed for the PWS equivalent and PWRI equivalent diameters for any individual aneurysm to be defined. RESULTS: PWS increased linearly and PWRI exponentially with respect to maximum AAA diameter. A size-adjusted analysis showed that PWS equivalent and PWRI equivalent diameters were increased by 7.5 mm (p = .013) and 14.0 mm (p < .001) in ruptured cases when compared to non-ruptured controls, respectively. In non-ruptured cases the PWRI equivalent diameters were increased by 13.2 mm (p < .001) in females when compared with males. CONCLUSIONS: Biomechanical parameters like PWS and PWRI allow for a highly individualized analysis by integrating factors that influence the risk of AAA rupture like geometry (degree of asymmetry, ILT morphology, etc.) and patient characteristics (gender, family history, blood pressure, etc.). PWRI and the reported annual risk of rupture increase similarly with the diameter. PWRI equivalent diameter expresses the PWRI through the diameter of the average AAA that has the same PWRI, i.e. is at the same biomechanical risk of rupture. Consequently, PWRI equivalent diameter facilitates a straightforward interpretation of biomechanical analysis and connects to diameter-based guidelines for AAA repair indication. PWRI equivalent diameter reflects an additional diagnostic parameter that may provide more accurate clinical data for AAA repair indication. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHigh Prevalence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Patients with Three-vessel Coronary Artery Disease.
Durieux, R.; VAN DAMME, Hendrik ULg; Labropoulos, N. et al

in European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (2014)

OBJECTIVES: Currently, the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and the correlation between CAD severity and AAA prevalence are not clearly known ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Currently, the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and the correlation between CAD severity and AAA prevalence are not clearly known. We conducted a prospective study to determine the prevalence of AAA in patients undergoing coronary angiography and to determine the risk factors and a coronary profile associated with AAA. METHODS: Over an 18-month period, abdominal aortic ultrasound was performed on 1,000 patients undergoing coronary angiography for suspected or known CAD, or prior to valve surgery. Clinical characteristics and coronary profile were collected from the patients. RESULTS: The overall number of previously repaired, already diagnosed, and new cases of AAA in the study population was 42, yielding a prevalence of 4.2%. Among the patients with newly detected AAAs, only two had an AAA diameter of >54 mm and were therefore treated surgically. In men aged >/=65 years, the prevalence reached 8.6%, while in men with three-vessel CAD it was 14.4%. Multivariate analysis showed that age >/=65 years (p = .003), male gender (p = .003), family history of AAA (p = .01), current smoking (p = .002), and three-vessel CAD (p < .001) were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of AAA. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of AAA was high in men aged >/=65 years and in those with three-vessel CAD regardless of age. While our findings do not prove the cost-effectiveness of screening for AAA in these high risk patients, they do support the usefulness of a quick ultrasound examination of the abdominal aorta during routine transthoracic echocardiography in such patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAcute abdominal aortic aneurysm: significant regional differences across Norway.
Kolh, Philippe ULg

in European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (2012), 44(3), 273

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStrengths and limits of risk stratification models in vascular surgery.
Kolh, Philippe ULg

in European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (2012), 44(1), 62-3

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCrural artery bypass with the autogenous greater saphenous vein
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Zhang, Lihong ULg; Baguet, E. et al

in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery : The Official Journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (2003), 26(6), 635-642

Objective. To evaluate the long-term outcome of greater saphenous vein (GSV) infrapopliteal revascularisation in a single centre over a 10 year period. Material and methods. Fourty-one variables relating ... [more ▼]

Objective. To evaluate the long-term outcome of greater saphenous vein (GSV) infrapopliteal revascularisation in a single centre over a 10 year period. Material and methods. Fourty-one variables relating to a consecutive series of 90 crural artery GSV(76% in situ) bypasses in 81 patients (1990-2000) were analysed. The mean age of the 47 men and 34 women was 70 years. Limb-threatening ischaemia was present in 96% of cases, claudication in four patients. In 18 patients, surgery was 'redo'. Results. The perioperative mortality was 3% (n = 3). Patient survival was 54% at 4 years. Independent risk factors affecting survival were chronic renal insufficiency (p = 0.04), hypertension (p = 0.02), and ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.01). Four bypasses thrombosed within 30 days. Three of them could be successfully reopened. Mean follow-up was 39 months. The primary patency rate at 4 years was 80%. Chronic renal insufficiency revealed to be the single independent risk factor for graft thrombosis (p = 0.03, RR = 12.4). The 4-year limb salvage rate was 88%. No independent risk factor affecting the limb salvage could be identified. Conclusion. Crural artery revascularisation is a valuable option for the management of limb threatening infrapopliteal arterial occlusive disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Impact of Renal Revascularisation on Renal Dysfunction
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Jeusette, F.; Pans, Alain ULg et al

in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery : The Official Journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (1995), 10(3), 330-7

AIM: To determine the value of kidney revascularisation in patients with impaired renal function and correctable renal artery stenosis, the authors reviewed their surgical experience from 1978 to 1990 ... [more ▼]

AIM: To determine the value of kidney revascularisation in patients with impaired renal function and correctable renal artery stenosis, the authors reviewed their surgical experience from 1978 to 1990. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study population included 23 patients with ischaemic nephropathy whose preoperative baseline creatinine level exceeded 20 mg/l (range 21-65 mg/l). This represents 20% of all patients operated on for renal artery disease during the same time interval. Preoperative risk profile, operative mortality, impact on hypertension and on renal function, and late survival were analysed. Renal function response to kidney revascularisation was defined as favourable (20% or more reduction of serum creatinine), moderate (stabilised serum creatinine values) or bad (further deterioration of renal function). All patients had atherosclerotic renal artery disease, involving a solitary kidney in five, both kidneys in 15 and one of the two kidneys in three patients. Hypertension was present in 74%. Revascularisation was unilateral in 10, bilateral in nine and associated with controlateral nephrectomy in four patients. RESULTS: Four patients died postoperatively (three myocardial infarctions, one stroke). Four patients needed postoperative short-term dialysis. After operation, renal function improved in 13, stabilised in six and deteriorated in four patients (of whom two died). Follow-up among the survivors averaged 46 months. The mean serum creatinine value at last follow-up visit was 26.2 mg/l, a decrease of 7.7 mg/l compared to preoperative values (p < 0.05). Overall, 69% of azotemic patients submitted to renal revascularisation manifested a favourable response (45% improved and 24% stabilised). Three patients required long-term dialysis. The 5-year survival rate was 48%. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that kidney revascularisation in patients with ischaemic nephropathy can restore or stabilise renal function, preventing evolution and end-stage renal disease and dialysis dependency. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)