References of "European Journal of Echocardiography"
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See detailEuroEcho and other imaging modalities: highlights
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg; Sicari, R et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2013)

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See detailThe role of multi-imaging modality in primary mitral regurgitation
Van de Heyning, C.; Magne, Julien ULg; Vrints, C. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2012), 13(2), 139-151

Primary mitral regurgitation (MR) is the first cause of valvular regurgitation in Western countries. Echocardiography is the cornerstone for diagnosing MR and more specifically for establishing its ... [more ▼]

Primary mitral regurgitation (MR) is the first cause of valvular regurgitation in Western countries. Echocardiography is the cornerstone for diagnosing MR and more specifically for establishing its aetiology and mechanism, for quantifying its severity, progression, and repercussion and for assessing the likelihood of successful of valve repair. Two-dimensional/three-dimensional transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography <br />are the most widely used methods. Interest is growing for exercise echocardiography particularly in patients in whom symptoms do not correlate well with MR severity and for risk stratification. The experience of multi-slice computed tomography in primary MR is still limited. Conversely, cardiovascular magnetic resonance has gained progressive relevance and represents the alternative method of choice. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropean association of echocardiography: research grant programme
Gargani, L.; Muraru, D.; Badano, L. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011)

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) offers a variety of grants/fellowships to help young professionals in the field of cardiological training or research activities throughout Europe. The number of ... [more ▼]

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) offers a variety of grants/fellowships to help young professionals in the field of cardiological training or research activities throughout Europe. The number of grants has significantly increased in recent years with contributions from the Associations, Working Groups and Councils of the ESC. The European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) is a registered branch of the ESC and actively takes part in this initiative. One of the aims of EAE is to promote excellence in research in cardiovascular ultrasound and other imaging modalities in Europe. Therefore, since 2008, the EAE offers a Research Grant Programme to help young doctors to obtain research experience in a high standard academic centre (or similar institution oriented to clinical or pre-clinical research) in an ESC member country other than their own. This programme can be considered as a valorization of the geographical mobility as well as cultural exchanges and professional practice in the field of cardiovascular imaging. The programme has been very successful so far, therefore in 2012 the EAE has increased its offer to two grants of 25 000 euros per annum each. [less ▲]

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See detailValvuloarterial impedance in aortic stenosis: look at the load, but do not forget the flow.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(5), 354-357

This editorial refers to ‘Valvuloarterial impedance does <br />not improve risk stratification in low-ejection fraction, <br />low-gradient aortic stenosis: results from a multicentre <br />study’ by F ... [more ▼]

This editorial refers to ‘Valvuloarterial impedance does <br />not improve risk stratification in low-ejection fraction, <br />low-gradient aortic stenosis: results from a multicentre <br />study’ by F. Levy et al., on page 358. [less ▲]

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See detailLeft atrial function and remodelling in aortic stenosis.
O'Connor, K.; Magne, Julien ULg; Rosca, M. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(4), 299-305

AIMS: The present study sought to determine the relationship between left atrial (LA) volume (structural changes) and LA function as assessed by strain rate imaging in patients with aortic stenosis (AS ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The present study sought to determine the relationship between left atrial (LA) volume (structural changes) and LA function as assessed by strain rate imaging in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). <br />METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of a total of 64 consecutive patients with severe AS (<1 cm²) and 20 healthy control subjects. The phasic LA volumes and function (tissue Doppler-derived strain) were assessed in all patients. As compared with healthy controls, all strain-derived parameters of LA function were reduced in patients with AS. Conversely, only indexed LA passive volume (increased) (7.6 ± 3.8 vs. 10.5 ± 5.1 ml/m², P= 0.02) and LA active fraction (decreased) (43 ± 6.7 vs. 31 ± 13.3%, P< 0.001) (volume-based parameters) were significantly different between AS and controls. In AS, LA volume-derived function parameters were poorly correlated with LA strain parameters. In fact, by multivariable analysis, no LA phasic strain parameters emerged as independently associated with LA phasic volume parameters. <br />CONCLUSIONS: In AS, changes in LA function did not parallel changes in LA size. Furthermore, the increase in LA volume does not necessarily reflect the presence of intrinsic LA dysfunction [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of aortic stenosis on longitudinal myocardial deformation during exercise.
Donal, E.; Thebault, C.; O'Connor, K. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011)

In aortic stenosis (AS), left ventricular (LV) adaptation to exercise has poorly been examined. Changes in LV ejection fraction may lack accuracy in identifying the presence of intrinsic myocardial ... [more ▼]

In aortic stenosis (AS), left ventricular (LV) adaptation to exercise has poorly been examined. Changes in LV ejection fraction may lack accuracy in identifying the presence of intrinsic myocardial impairment. AIMS: We sought to determine the impact of aortic stenosis (AS) on left ventricular (LV) longitudinal function at exercise in a series of asymptomatic patients with AS and preserved LV ejection fraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Long-axis function was assessed at rest and at exercise by using 2D speckle tracking of myocardial deformation in 207 AS patients (aortic valve area 0.87 ± 0.19 cm²) and 43 aged-matched control subjects. When compared with control subjects, patients with AS have reduced longitudinal myocardial function at rest (-20.2 ± 2.7 vs. -15.4 ± 4.0%) and at peak exercise (-25.0 ± 3.7 vs. -16.5 ± 4.9%) (P < 0.0001 for both). Exercise changes in global longitudinal strain were correlated with changes in LV ejection in controls but not in patients with AS. Changes in LV global longitudinal strain during test were lower in AS patients with an abnormal response to exercise (-0.5 ± 2.7 vs. -1.5 ± 2.8%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a lower global longitudinal strain at rest (P = 0.04), a higher increase in mean trans-valvular pressure gradient (P < 0.001) at exercise, and smaller exercise-induced changes in global longitudinal strain (P < 0.001) were associated with an abnormal exercise test. CONCLUSION: In AS, subnormal LV function can be reliably identified by 2D strain imaging at rest and during a sub-maximal exercise. That sensitive measure of LV systolic function is depressed in AS and even more in patients having the most severe AS. [less ▲]

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See detailThe use of pocket-size imaging devices: a position statement of the European Association of Echocardiography.
Sicari, R.; Galderisi, M.; Voigt, J. U. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011)

Pocket-size imaging devices are a completely new type of echo machines which have recently reached the market. They are very cheap, smartphone-size hand-held echo machines with limited technical ... [more ▼]

Pocket-size imaging devices are a completely new type of echo machines which have recently reached the market. They are very cheap, smartphone-size hand-held echo machines with limited technical capabilities. The aim of this European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) position paper is to provide recommendations on the use of pocket-size imaging devices in the clinical arena by profiling the educational needs of potential users other than cardiologists experts in echo. EAE recommendations about pocket-size imaging devices can be summarized in: (1) pocket-size imaging devices do not provide a complete diagnostic echocardiographic examination. The range of indications for their use is therefore limited. (2) Imaging assessment with pocket-size imaging devices should be reported as part of the physical examination of the patient. Image data should be stored according to the applicable national rules for technical examinations. (3) With the exception of cardiologists who are certified for transthoracic echocardiography according to national legislation, specific training and certification is recommended for all users. The certification should be limited to the clinical questions that can potentially be answered by pocket-size devices. (4) The patient has to be informed that an examination with the current generation of pocket-size imaging devices does not replace a complete echocardiogram. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in mitral regurgitation and left ventricular geometry during exercise affect exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.
Izumo, Masaki; Suzuki, Kengo; Moonen, Marie ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(1), 54-60

AIMS: exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic ... [more ▼]

AIMS: exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry would affect exercise capacity. METHODS AND RESULTS: this study included 30 CHF patients with functional MR who underwent symptom-limited bicycle exercise stress echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing for quantitative assessment of MR (effective regurgitant orifice; ERO), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). LV sphericity index was obtained from real-time three-dimensional echocardiograms. The patients were stratified into exercised-induced MR (EMR; n = 10, an increase in ERO by >/=13 mm(2)) or non-EMR (NEMR; n = 20, an increase in ERO by <13 mm(2)) group. At rest, no differences in LV volume and function, ERO, and PASP were found between the two groups. At peak exercise, PASP and sphericity index were significantly greater (all P < 0.01) in the EMR group. The EMR group revealed lower peak oxygen uptake (peak VO(2); P = 0.018) and greater minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (VE/VCO(2) slope; P = 0.042) than the NEMR group. Peak VO(2) negatively correlated with changes in ERO (r = -0.628) and LV sphericity index (r = -0.437); meanwhile, VE/VCO(2) slope was well correlated with these changes (r = 0.414 and 0.364, respectively). A multivariate analysis identified that the change in ERO was the strongest predictor of peak VO(2) (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry contributed to the limitation of exercise capacity in patients with CHF. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of aortic stiffness on left ventricular function and B-type natriuretic peptide release in severe aortic stenosis.
Rosca, M.; Magne, Julien ULg; Calin, A. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(11), 850-856

Aims: In aortic stenosis (AS), both reduced systemic arterial compliance and increased valvular load have been shown to contribute to impaired left ventricular (LV) function. However, the relationship ... [more ▼]

Aims: In aortic stenosis (AS), both reduced systemic arterial compliance and increased valvular load have been shown to contribute to impaired left ventricular (LV) function. However, the relationship between LV function and aortic stiffness has not yet been investigated. We aimed to assess the relationship between aortic stiffness and LV global longitudinal strain (GLS), LV filling pressures (E/E′) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in AS. <br />Methods and results : A comprehensive echocardiogram was performed in 48 consecutive patients with severe AS (,0.6 cm2/m2) and preserved LV ejection fraction (≥50%). Aortic stiffness index (beta) was calculated based on aortic diameters measured by echocardiography and blood pressure. Systemic arterial compliance (SAC) and valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva) <br />were also determined. Aortic beta index was significantly correlated with Zva (r ¼ 0.30, P ¼ 0.03) and SAC (r ¼ 20.29, P ¼ 0.04). GLS (r ¼ 0.45, P ¼ 0.001), E/E′ (r ¼ 0.48, P ¼ 0.001) and BNP levels (r ¼ 0.45, P ¼ 0.001) were significantly related to aortic beta index. No significant correlation was found between GLS or E/E′ and SAC or Zva. In multivariate regression analysis, aortic beta index remained correlated with GLS, E/E′, and BNP levels. <br />Conclusions : In patients with severe AS and preserved LV ejection fraction, independently of the valvular load, an increase in aortic rigidity, as assessed by aortic beta index, is independently correlated with reduced LV longitudinal function, increased LV filling pressures, and BNP levels. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of global left ventricular afterload on left ventricular function in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a two-dimensional speckle-tracking study.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Donal, Erwan; Magne, Julien ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2010), 11(6), 537-543

Aims: The present study sought to assess the effect of global left ventricular (LV) afterload on LV myocardial systolic function in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and preserved LV ejection fraction ... [more ▼]

Aims: The present study sought to assess the effect of global left ventricular (LV) afterload on LV myocardial systolic function in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and preserved LV ejection fraction. <br />Methods and results: We prospectively examined the LV myocardial deformation (i.e. longitudinal, radial, and circumferential) by two-dimensional speckle tracking in 173 patients with asymptomatic severe AS. Thirty-eight patients (22%) had lowflow as determined by a low stroke volume index (􏰀35 mL/m2). By multivariable analysis, four variables emerged as independently associated with low-flow AS: peak Ea velocity (P 1⁄4 0.01), left atrial area index (P 1⁄4 0.017), global LV afterload (P 1⁄4 0.024), and circumferential myocardial deformation (P 1⁄4 0.04). Forty-nine patients (28%) had an increased global LV afterload (􏰁5 mmHg mL/m2). Systemic arterial compliance (P 1⁄4 0.001), circumferential myocardial deformation (P 1⁄4 0.024), and left atrial area index (P 1⁄4 0.04) were independently associated with increased global LV load in multivariable analysis. <br />Conclusion: In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, LV ejection fraction markedly underestimates the extent of myocardial sys- tolic impairment. Intrinsic myocardial dysfunction is particularly common in patients with increased global LV after- load, and especially in the subset of patients with low-flow AS. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of regional wall motion during contrast-enhanced dobutamine stress echocardiography: effect of contrast imaging settings.
Cosyns, Bernard; Van Camp, Guy; Droogmans, Sophie et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2009), 10(8), 956-60

Aims: Myocardial contrast perfusion echocardiography (MCE) allows simultaneous assessment of perfusion and function. However, low frame rate during MCE may reduce the viewer's ability to discern ... [more ▼]

Aims: Myocardial contrast perfusion echocardiography (MCE) allows simultaneous assessment of perfusion and function. However, low frame rate during MCE may reduce the viewer's ability to discern contractile dysfunction. This study sought to compare MCE and left ventricular opacification (LVO) settings with regard to wall motion abnormalities (WMA) at rest and during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Methods and results: In 50 patients scheduled for coronary angiography and with poor baseline image quality, MCE and LVO were performed during DSE. Regional wall motion was assessed and inter-observer agreement was determined for each imaging modality. The endocardial border score index was similar for both modalities. The wall motion score index (WMSCI) at peak stress using MCE was well correlated with WMSCI obtained with LVO (r2 = 0.9, P < 0.001). However, WMSCI at peak stress was underestimated by MCE (1.66 ± 0.58 with DSE-LVO vs. 1.535 ± 0.50 with DSE-MCE; P < 0.001). Inter-observer agreement on the presence of WMA was 0.65 for MCE and 0.67 for LVO at peak stress. Conclusion: Myocardial contrast perfusion echocardiography provides equal endocardial border delineation compared with LVO modality. Although the inter-observer agreement is slightly higher with LVO compared with MCE, it is not significantly different with MCE at peak stress. Despite the similar improvement in endocardial border delineation, LVO settings allow the detection of more WMA than MCE at peak stress, leading to a significantly higher accuracy for the detection of ischaemia in patients suspected of coronary artery disease when only wall motion is taken into account. [less ▲]

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See detailThree-dimensional echocardiographic assessments of exercise-induced changes in left ventricular shape and dyssynchrony in patients with dynamic functional mitral regurgitation.
Izumo, Mazaki; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; Suzuki, Kengo et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2009), 10(8), 961-7

Aims: Left ventricular (LV) shape and LV dyssynchrony are two cofactors associated with functional mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients with heart failure. Both can be accurately examined by real-time ... [more ▼]

Aims: Left ventricular (LV) shape and LV dyssynchrony are two cofactors associated with functional mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients with heart failure. Both can be accurately examined by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). We examined the relationship between dynamic MR and exercise-induced changes in LV shape and synchronicity using 3DE. Methods and results: Fifty patients with systolic LV dysfunction underwent 2D and 3D quantitative assessment of LV function, shape, and synchronicity at rest and during symptom-limited exercise test. According to the magnitude of change in MR, patients were divided into EMR group (15 patients, 30%), if the degree of MR increased during test, and NEMR group. During exercise, the changes in LV volumes and ejection fraction were similar in both groups, whereas changes in mitral valvular deformation parameters, in LV sphericity index, and in the extent of LV dyssynchrony were more pronounced in the EMR group. At rest, only the 3D sphericity index could distinguish the two groups. By stepwise multiple regression model, dynamic changes in the systolic dyssynchrony index, sphericity index, and coaptation distance were associated with dynamic MR (r2 = 0.45, P = 0.012). Conclusion: Dynamic MR during exercise is related to the 3D changes in LV shape and in LV synchronicity. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropean Association of Echocardiography recommendations for training, competence, and quality improvement in echocardiography
Popescu, Bogdan A.; Andrade, Maria J.; Badano, Luigi et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2009), 10(8), 893-905

The main mission statement of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) is ‘to promote excellence in clinical diagnosis, research, technical development, and education in cardiovascular ... [more ▼]

The main mission statement of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) is ‘to promote excellence in clinical diagnosis, research, technical development, and education in cardiovascular ultrasound in Europe’. As competence and quality control issues are increasingly recognized by patients, physicians, and payers, the EAE has established recommendations for training, competence, and quality improvement in echocardiography. The purpose of this document is to provide the requirements for training and competence in echocardiography, to outline the principles of quality measurement, and to recommend a set of measures for improvement, with the ultimate goal of raising the standards of echocardiographic practice in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailMyocardial contractile reserve during exercise predicts left ventricular reserve remodelling after cardiac resynchromization therapy
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Senechal, Mario; Moonen, Marie ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2009), 10(5), 663-8

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See detailEuropean association of echocardiography recommandations for standardization of performance, digital staorage and reporting of echocardiographic studies
Evangelista, A.; Flachskampf, F.; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2008), 9(4), 438-48

In view of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) mission statement “To promote excellence in clinical diagnosis, research, technical development, and education in cardiovascular ultrasound in ... [more ▼]

In view of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) mission statement “To promote excellence in clinical diagnosis, research, technical development, and education in cardiovascular ultrasound in Europe” and the increasing demand for standardization and quality control, the EAE have established recommendations and guidelines for standardization of echocardiography performance, data acquisition (images, measurements and morphologic descriptors), digital storage and reporting of echocardiographic studies. The aim of these recommendations is to provide a European consensus document on the minimum acceptable requirements for the clinical practice of echocardiography today and thus improve the quality and consistency of echocardiographic practice in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailStress echocardiography expert consensus statement-executive summary: european association of echocardiography (a registrated branch of the ESC).
Sicari, R.; Nihoyannopoulos, P.; Evangelista, A. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2008), 9(4), 415-37

In view of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) mission statement "To promote excellence in clinical diagnosis, research, technical development, and education in cardiovascular ultrasound in ... [more ▼]

In view of the European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) mission statement "To promote excellence in clinical diagnosis, research, technical development, and education in cardiovascular ultrasound in Europe" and the increasing demand for standardization and quality control, the EAE have established recommendations and guidelines for standardization of echocardiography performance, data acquisition (images, measurements and morphologic descriptors), digital storage and reporting of echocardiographic studies. The aim of these recommendations is to provide a European consensus document on the minimum acceptable requirements for the clinical practice of echocardiography today and thus improve the quality and consistency of echocardiographic practice in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailDeterminants of an abnormal response to exercise in patients with asymptomatic valvular aortic stenosis.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Karsera, Danai; Tumminello, Gabriele et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2008), 9(3), 338-43

AIM: Patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and abnormal haemodynamic responses to exercise testing are at increased risk of cardiac events. This study assesses the Doppler echocardiographic ... [more ▼]

AIM: Patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and abnormal haemodynamic responses to exercise testing are at increased risk of cardiac events. This study assesses the Doppler echocardiographic determinants of a positive exercise test in a cohort of asymptomatic patients with AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-eight patients with AS underwent quantitative Doppler echocardiographic measurements at rest and during exercise test. Of these patients, 60 had an abnormal response to exercise. Two independent determinants of an abnormal exercise response were selected in multivariate analysis: a larger increase in mean transaortic pressure gradient (P = 0.00014) and a limited contractile reserve-latent left ventricular dysfunction-as indicated by smaller changes in ejection fraction (P = 0.0002). Limiting symptoms were associated with greater increase in mean transaortic pressure gradient, smaller changes in systolic blood pressure and a lower ejection fraction at peak exercise. The increase in pressure gradient was associated with smaller exercise-induced changes in aortic valve area and in ejection fraction and new or worsening mitral regurgitation during exercise. CONCLUSION: Abnormal responses to exercise in asymptomatic AS patients are mediated by a larger increase in mean transaortic pressure gradient and/or a limited contractile reserve characterized by an inadequate increase in ejection fraction at exercise. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of surgery on ischaemic mitral regurgitation: a prospective multicentre registry (SIMRAM registry).
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Donal, Erwan; Cosyns, Bernard et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2008), 9(1), 26-30

AIMS: Functional ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is common in patients with ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Although the presence of IMR negatively ... [more ▼]

AIMS: Functional ischaemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is common in patients with ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Although the presence of IMR negatively affects prognosis, the additional benefit of valve repair is debated, particularly with mild IMR at rest. Exercise echocardiography may help identify a subset of patients at higher risk of cardiovascular events by revealing the dynamic component of IMR. METHODS: A large prospective, multicentre, non-randomized registry is designed to evaluate the effects of surgery on IMR at rest and on its dynamic component at exercise (z). SIMRAM will enrol approximately 550 patients with IMR in up to 17 centres with clinical and exercise follow-up for 1 year. Three sets of outcomes will be prospectively assessed and several hypotheses will be tested including determinants of adverse outcome and progressive left ventricular remodeling, efficacy of treatment and role of ischaemia on the dynamic consequences of IMR. Enrolment began in November 2006 and is expected to end by early 2008. [less ▲]

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See detailPronostic Implications of semi-supine stress echocardiography for evaluation of chest pain in the emergency room
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; HOFFER, E; APPELTANS, H et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (1999)

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