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See detailHiv-1 Gp41 And Gp160 Are Hyperthermostable Proteins In A Mesophilic Environment - Characterization Of Gp41 Mutants
Krell, Tino; Greco, Frédéric; Engel, Olivier et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (2004), 271(8), 1566-79

HIV gp41(24-157) unfolds cooperatively over the pH range of 1.0-4.0 with T(m) values of > 100 degrees C. At pH 2.8, protein unfolding was 80% reversible and the DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) ratio of 3.7 is ... [more ▼]

HIV gp41(24-157) unfolds cooperatively over the pH range of 1.0-4.0 with T(m) values of > 100 degrees C. At pH 2.8, protein unfolding was 80% reversible and the DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) ratio of 3.7 is indicative of gp41 being trimeric. No evidence for a monomer-trimer equilibrium in the concentration range of 0.3-36 micro m was obtained by DSC and tryptophan fluorescence. Glycosylation of gp41 was found to have only a marginal impact on the thermal stability. Reduction of the disulfide bond or mutation of both cysteine residues had only a marginal impact on protein stability. There was no cooperative unfolding event in the DSC thermogram of gp160 in NaCl/P(i), pH 7.4, over a temperature range of 8-129 degrees C. When the pH was lowered to 5.5-3.4, a single unfolding event at around 120 degrees C was noted, and three unfolding events at 93.3, 106.4 and 111.8 degrees C were observed at pH 2.8. Differences between gp41 and gp160, and hyperthermostable proteins from thermophile organisms are discussed. A series of gp41 mutants containing single, double, triple or quadruple point mutations were analysed by DSC and CD. The impact of mutations on the protein structure, in the context of generating a gp41 based vaccine antigen that resembles a fusion intermediate state, is discussed. A gp41 mutant, in which three hydrophobic amino acids in the gp41 loop were replaced with charged residues, showed an increased solubility at neutral pH. [less ▲]

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See detailInactivation of Aeromonas Hydrophila Metallo-Beta-Lactamase by Cephamycins and Moxalactam
Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Valladares, Maria Hernandez; Devreese, Bart et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (2001), 268(13), 3840-50

Incubation of moxalactam and cefoxitin with the Aeromonas hydrophila metallo-beta-lactamase CphA leads to enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of both compounds and to irreversible inactivation of the enzyme by ... [more ▼]

Incubation of moxalactam and cefoxitin with the Aeromonas hydrophila metallo-beta-lactamase CphA leads to enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of both compounds and to irreversible inactivation of the enzyme by the reaction products. As shown by electrospray mass spectrometry, the inactivation of CphA by cefoxitin and moxalactam is accompanied by the formation of stable adducts with mass increases of 445 and 111 Da, respectively. The single thiol group of the inactivated enzyme is no longer titrable, and dithiothreitol treatment of the complexes partially restores the catalytic activity. The mechanism of inactivation by moxalactam was studied in detail. Hydrolysis of moxalactam is followed by elimination of the 3' leaving group (5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole), which forms a disulfide bond with the cysteine residue of CphA located in the active site. Interestingly, this reaction is catalyzed by cacodylate. [less ▲]

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See detailBasic residues of human group IIA phospholipase A2 are important for binding to factor Xa and prothrombinase inhibition comparison with other mammalian secreted phospholipases A2.
Mounier, C. M.; Luchetta, P.; Lecut, Christelle ULg et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (2000), 267(16), 4960-9

Human secreted group IIA phospholipase A2 (hGIIA) was reported to inhibit prothrombinase activity because of binding to factor Xa. This study further shows that hGIIA and its catalytically inactive H48Q ... [more ▼]

Human secreted group IIA phospholipase A2 (hGIIA) was reported to inhibit prothrombinase activity because of binding to factor Xa. This study further shows that hGIIA and its catalytically inactive H48Q mutant prolong the lag time of thrombin generation in human platelet-rich plasma with similar efficiency, indicating that hGIIA exerts an anticoagulant effect independently of phospholipid hydrolysis under ex vivo conditions. Charge reversal of basic residues on the interfacial binding surface (IBS) of hGIIA leads to decreased ability to inhibit prothrombinase activity, which correlates with a reduced affinity for factor Xa, as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Mutation of other surface-exposed basic residues, hydrophobic residues on the IBS, and His48, does not affect the ability of hGIIA to inhibit prothrombinase activity and bind to factor Xa. Other basic, but not neutral or acidic, mammalian secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) exert a phospholipid-independent inhibitory effect on prothrombinase activity, suggesting that these basic sPLA2s also bind to factor Xa. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the anticoagulant effect of hGIIA is independent of phospholipid hydrolysis and is based on its interaction with factor Xa, leading to prothrombinase inhibition, even under ex vivo conditions. This study also shows that such an interaction involves basic residues located on the IBS of hGIIA, and suggests that other basic mammalian sPLA2s may also inhibit blood coagulation by a similar mechanism to that described for hGIIA. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of the carbohydrate moiety to conformational stability of the carboxypeptidase Y high pressure study.
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Ueno, H.; Hayashi, R. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1999), 262(2), 475-83

The process of pressure-induced denaturation of carboxypeptidase Y and the role of the carbohydrate moiety in its response to pressure and low temperature were investigated by measuring in situ the ... [more ▼]

The process of pressure-induced denaturation of carboxypeptidase Y and the role of the carbohydrate moiety in its response to pressure and low temperature were investigated by measuring in situ the catalytic activity and, the intrinsic and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid binding fluorescences. Pressure-induced denaturation of carboxypeptidase Y is a process involving at least three transitions. Low pressures (below 150 MPa) induced slight conformational changes characterized by a slight decrease in the center of the spectral mass of intrinsic fluorescence, whereas no changes in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid binding fluorescence were observed and 80% of the catalytic activity remained. Higher pressure (150-500 MPa) induced further conformational changes, characterized by a large decrease in the center of the spectral mass of intrinsic fluorescence, a large increase in the 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid binding fluorescence and the loss of all catalytic activity. Thus, this intermediate exhibited characteristics of molten globule-like state. A further increase, in pressure (above 550 MPa) induced transition from this first molten globule-like state to a second molten globule-like state. This two-stage denaturation process can be explained by assuming the existence of two independent structural domains in the carboxypeptidase molecule. A similar three-transition process was found for unglycosylated carboxypeptidase Y, but, the first two transitions clearly occurred at lower pressures than those for glycosylated carboxypeptidase Y. These findings indicate that the carbohydrate moiety protects carboxypeptidase Y against pressure-induced denaturation. The origin of the protective effects is discussed based on the known crystallographic structure of CPY. [less ▲]

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See detailOverexpression, purification and characterization of Mycobacterium bovis BCG alcohol dehydrogenase.
Wilkin, J. M.; Soetaert, K.; Stelandre, M. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1999), 262(2), 299-307

A previous study of the effect of zinc deprivation on Mycobacterium bovis BCG pointed out the potential importance of an alcohol dehydrogenase for maintaining the hydrophobic character of the cell ... [more ▼]

A previous study of the effect of zinc deprivation on Mycobacterium bovis BCG pointed out the potential importance of an alcohol dehydrogenase for maintaining the hydrophobic character of the cell envelope. In this report, the effect of the overexpression of the M. bovis BCG alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. bovis BCG is described. The purification of the enzyme was performed to apparent homogeneity from overexpressing M. bovis BCG cells and its kinetic parameters were determined. The enzyme showed a strong preference for both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes while the corresponding alcohols were processed 100-1000-fold less efficiently. The best kcat/Km values were found with benzaldehyde > 3-methoxybenzaldehyde > octanal > coniferaldehyde. A phylogenetic analysis clearly revealed that the M. bovis BCG ADH together with the ADHs from Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori formed a sister group of the class C medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases, the plant cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs). Comparison of the kinetic properties of our ADH with some related class C enzymes indicated that the mycobacterial enzyme substrate profile resembled that of the CADs involved in plant defence rather than those implicated in lignification. A possible role for the M. bovis BCG ADH in the biosynthesis of the lipids composing the mycobacterial cell envelope is proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of the carbohydrate moiety to conformational stability of the carboxypeptidase Y high pressure study.
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Ueno, H.; Hayashi, R. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1999), 262(2), 475-83

The process of pressure-induced denaturation of carboxypeptidase Y and the role of the carbohydrate moiety in its response to pressure and low temperature were investigated by measuring in situ the ... [more ▼]

The process of pressure-induced denaturation of carboxypeptidase Y and the role of the carbohydrate moiety in its response to pressure and low temperature were investigated by measuring in situ the catalytic activity and, the intrinsic and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid binding fluorescences. Pressure-induced denaturation of carboxypeptidase Y is a process involving at least three transitions. Low pressures (below 150 MPa) induced slight conformational changes characterized by a slight decrease in the center of the spectral mass of intrinsic fluorescence, whereas no changes in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid binding fluorescence were observed and 80% of the catalytic activity remained. Higher pressure (150-500 MPa) induced further conformational changes, characterized by a large decrease in the center of the spectral mass of intrinsic fluorescence, a large increase in the 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid binding fluorescence and the loss of all catalytic activity. Thus, this intermediate exhibited characteristics of molten globule-like state. A further increase, in pressure (above 550 MPa) induced transition from this first molten globule-like state to a second molten globule-like state. This two-stage denaturation process can be explained by assuming the existence of two independent structural domains in the carboxypeptidase molecule. A similar three-transition process was found for unglycosylated carboxypeptidase Y, but, the first two transitions clearly occurred at lower pressures than those for glycosylated carboxypeptidase Y. These findings indicate that the carbohydrate moiety protects carboxypeptidase Y against pressure-induced denaturation. The origin of the protective effects is discussed based on the known crystallographic structure of CPY. [less ▲]

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See detailTransport of arginine and ornithine into isolated mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Soetens, Oriane; Crabeel, Marjolaine; Elmoualij, Benaïssa ULg et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1998), 258(2), 702-9

In this work we have characterised the transport of L-arginine and L-ornithine into mitochondria isolated from a wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and an isogenic arg11 knock-out mutant. The Arg11 ... [more ▼]

In this work we have characterised the transport of L-arginine and L-ornithine into mitochondria isolated from a wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and an isogenic arg11 knock-out mutant. The Arg11 protein (Arg11p) is a mitochondrial carrier required for arginine biosynthesis [Crabeel, M., Soetens, O., De Rijcke, M., Pratiwi, R. & Pankiewicz, R. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 25011-25019]. Reconstitution experiments have confirmed that it is an L-ornithine carrier also transporting L-arginine and L-lysine by order of decreasing affinity, but not L-histidine [Palmieri, L., De Marco, V., Iacobazzi, V., Palmieri, F., Runswick, M. & Walker, J. (1997) FEBS Lett. 410, 447-451]. Evidence is presented here that the mitochondrial inner membrane contains an L-arginine and L-ornithine transporting system distinct from Arg11p, in keeping with the arginine leaky phenotype of arg11 knock-out mutants. The newly characterised carrier, which we propose to name Bac1p (basic amino acid carrier), behaves as an antiporter catalysing the electroneutral exchange of the basic amino acids L-arginine, L-lysine, L-ornithine and L-histidine and displays the highest affinity for L-arginine (Km of 30 microM). L-Arginine uptake has a pH optimum in the range of 7.5-9 and is inhibited by several sulphydryl reagents, by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and by cations [less ▲]

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See detailContribution Of The Hydrophobicity Gradient Of An Amphipathic Peptide To Its Mode Of Association With Lipids
Perez-Mendez, O.; Vanloo, B.; Decout, A. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1998), 256(3), 570-9

A class of peptides that associate with lipids, known as oblique-orientated peptides, was recently described [Brasseur R., Pillot, T., Lins, L., Vandekerckhove, J. & Rosseneu, M. (1997) Trends Biochem ... [more ▼]

A class of peptides that associate with lipids, known as oblique-orientated peptides, was recently described [Brasseur R., Pillot, T., Lins, L., Vandekerckhove, J. & Rosseneu, M. (1997) Trends Biochem. Sci. 22, 167-171]. Due to an asymmetric distribution of hydrophobic residues along the axis of the alpha-helix, such peptides adopt an oblique orientation which can destabilise membranes or lipid cores. Variants of these oblique peptides, designed to have an homogeneous distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues along the helical axis, are classified as regular amphipathic peptides. These peptides are expected to lie parallel to the polar/apolar interface with their hydrophobic residues directed towards the apolar and their hydrophilic residues towards the polar phase. An hydrophobic, oblique-orientated peptide was identified at residues 56-68 in the sequence of the lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), enzyme. This peptide is predicted to penetrate a lipid bilayer at an angle of 40 degrees through its more hydrophobic C-terminal end and thereby induce the destabilisation of a membrane or a lipid core. The LCAT-(56-68) wild-type peptide was synthesised together with the LCAT-(56-68, 0 degrees) variant, in which the hydrophobicity gradient was abolished through residue permutations. In two other variants, designed to keep their oblique orientation, the W61 residue was shifted either towards the more hydrophilic N-terminal at residue 57, or to position 68 at the hydrophobic C-terminal end of the peptide. Peptide-induced vesicle fusion was demonstrated by fluorescence measurements using pyrene-labeled vesicles and by monitoring of vesicle size by gel filtration. The interaction between peptides and lipids was monitored by measurement of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission of the peptides. Fluorescence polarisation measurements, using diphenyl hexatriene, were carried out to follow changes in the lipid fluidity. The LCAT-(56-68) wild-type peptide and the two oblique variants, induced fusion of unilamellar dimyristoylglycerophosphocholine vesicles. Tryptophan fluorescence emission measurements showed a 12-14 nm blue shift upon addition of the wild-type peptide and of the W61-->68 variant to lipids, whereas the fluorescence of the W61-->57 variant did not change significantly. This observation supports the insertion of the more hydrophobic C-terminal residues into the lipid phase, as predicted by the theoretical calculations. In contrast, the 0 degrees variant peptide had no fusogenic activity, and it associated with lipids to form small discoidal lipid/peptide complexes. The phospholipid transition temperature was decreased after addition of the wild-type, the W61-->68 and W61-->57 fusogenic peptides, whereas the opposite effect was observed with the 0 degrees variant. The behaviour of the wild-type and variant LCAT-(56-68) peptides stresses the contribution of the hydrophobicity gradient along the axis of an amphipathic peptide to the mode of association of this peptide with lipids. This parameter consequently influences the structural modifications occurring to lipids upon association with amphipathic peptides. [less ▲]

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See detailThe C-terminal helix of human apolipoprotein AII promotes the fusion of unilamellar liposomes and displaces apolipoprotein AI from high-density lipoproteins.
Lambert, Géraldine ULg; Decout, A.; Vanloo, B. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1998), 253(1), 328-38

To assess the functional properties of apolipoprotein (apo) AII and to investigate the mechanism leading to the displacement of apo AI from native and reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (HDL and r ... [more ▼]

To assess the functional properties of apolipoprotein (apo) AII and to investigate the mechanism leading to the displacement of apo AI from native and reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (HDL and r-HDL) by apo AII, wild-type and variant apo AII peptides were synthesized. The wild-type peptides, residues 53-70 and 58-70, correspond to the C-terminal helix of apo AII and are predicted to insert at a tilted angle into a lipid bilayer. We demonstrate that both the apo AII-(53-70) peptide, and to a lesser extent the apo AII-(58-70) peptide are able to induce fusion of unilamellar lipid vesicles together with membrane leakage, and to displace apo AI from HDL and r-HDL. Two variants of the apo AII-(53-70)-wild-type (WT) peptide, designed either to be parallel to the water/lipid interface [apo AII-(53-70)-0 degrees] or to retain an oblique orientation [apo AII-(53-70)-30 degrees], were synthesized in order to test the influence of the obliquity on their fusogenic properties and ability to displace apo AI from HDL. The parallel variant did not bind lipids, due to its self-association properties. However, the apo AII-(53-70)-30 degrees variant was fusogenic and promoted the displacement of apo AI from HDL. Moreover, the extent of fusion of the apo AII-(53-70)-WT, apo AII-(58-70)-WT and apo AII-(53-70)-30 degrees peptides was related to the alpha-helical content of the lipid-bound peptides measured by infrared spectroscopy. Infrared measurements using polarized light also confirmed the oblique orientation of the helical component of the three peptides. In native and r-HDL, the tilted insertion of the C-terminal helix of apo AII resulting in a partial destabilization of the HDL external lipid layer might contribute to the displacement of apo AI by apo AII. [less ▲]

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See detailEnzymes from Cold-Adapted Microorganisms. The Class C Beta-Lactamase from the Antarctic Psychrophile Psychrobacter Immobilis A5
Feller, Georges ULg; Zekhnini, Z.; Lamotte-Brasseur, J. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1997), 244(1), 186-91

A heat-labile beta-lactamase has been purified from culture supernatants of Psychrobacter immobilis A5 grown at 4 degrees C and the corresponding chromosomal ampC gene has been cloned and sequenced. All ... [more ▼]

A heat-labile beta-lactamase has been purified from culture supernatants of Psychrobacter immobilis A5 grown at 4 degrees C and the corresponding chromosomal ampC gene has been cloned and sequenced. All structural and kinetic properties clearly relate this enzyme to class C beta-lactamases. The kinetic parameters of P. immobilis beta-lactamase for the hydrolysis of some beta-lactam antibiotics are in the same range as the values recorded for the highly specialized cephalosporinases from pathogenic mesophilic bacteria. By contrast, the enzyme displays a low apparent optimum temperature of activity and a reduced thermal stability. Structural factors responsible for the latter property were analysed from the three-dimensional structure built by homology modelling. The deletion of proline residues in loops, the low number of arginine-mediated H-bonds and aromatic-aromatic interactions, the lower global hydrophobicity and the improved solvent interactions through additional surface acidic residues appear to be the main determinants of the enzyme flexibility. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial Asparaginyl-Trna Synthetase Is Encoded By The Yeast Nuclear Gene Ycr24c
Landrieu, I.; Vandenbol, Micheline ULg; Hartlein, M. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1997), 243(1-2),

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See detailStructural And Functional Properties Of The 154-171 Wild-Type And Variant Peptides Of Human Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase
Peelman, F.; Goethals, M.; Vanloo, B. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1997), 249(3), 708-15

The 154-171 segment of the human lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) enzyme was identified as the most stable amphipathic helix in the LCAT sequence. Its mean hydrophobicity, hydrophobic moment ... [more ▼]

The 154-171 segment of the human lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) enzyme was identified as the most stable amphipathic helix in the LCAT sequence. Its mean hydrophobicity, hydrophobic moment and its orientation at a lipid/water interface are similar to those of some of the helical repeats of apolipoprotein A-IV and E. This domain was therefore proposed as a candidate peptide accounting for the association between LCAT and its lipid substrate. To investigate this hypothesis we synthesized the LCAT-(154-171)-peptide, two variants containing the natural Y156N and R158C mutations and a variant with increased hydrophobicity through Y156I, L160I, L163I and Y171W substitutions. The structural and lipid-binding properties of these synthetic peptides were investigated by turbidity, fluorescence, electron microscopy and circular dichroism. The wild-type peptide, the R158C variant in its dimeric form, as well as the more hydrophobic peptide, associated with phospholipids, whereas the Y156N and the R158C variant in its monomeric form did not. However, only the complexes generated with the hydrophobic variant were stable enough to resist dissociation during gel filtration. The wild-type peptide and hydrophobic variant formed discoidal complexes with dimyristoylglycerophosphocholine (Myr2GroPCho) as shown by negative staining electron microscopy. Comparison of the properties of the wild-type and hydrophobic variant LCAT-(154-171)-peptide stresses the contribution of the hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix to the formation and stabilization of the peptide/lipid complexes. This is further confirmed by the decreased affinity of the Y156N variant peptide for lipids, as this mutation decreased the mean hydrophobicity of the hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix. These results support the hypothesis that the 154-171 segment of LCAT might be involved in the interaction of the enzyme with its lipid substrate and suggest that the decreased activity of the Y156N natural LCAT mutant might result from a decreased affinity of this mutant for lipids. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific Modulation Of The Fusogenic Properties Of The Alzheimer Beta-Amyloid Peptide By Apolipoprotein E Isoforms
Pillot, T.; Goethals, M.; Vanloo, B. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1997), 243(3), 650-9

C-terminal fragments of the Alzheimer amyloid peptide (amino acids 29-40 and 29-42) have physico-chemical properties related to those of the fusion peptides of viral proteins and they are able to induce ... [more ▼]

C-terminal fragments of the Alzheimer amyloid peptide (amino acids 29-40 and 29-42) have physico-chemical properties related to those of the fusion peptides of viral proteins and they are able to induce the fusion of liposomes in vitro. We proposed that these properties could mediate a direct interaction of the amyloid peptide with cell membranes and account for part of the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptide. In view of the epidemiologic and biochemical linkages between the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and apolipoprotein E (apoE) polymorphism, we examined the potential interaction between the three common apoE isoforms and the C-terminal fragments of the amyloid peptide. We show that, at low concentration, only apoE2 and apoE3 are potent inhibitors of the amyloid peptide fusogenic and aggregational properties, whereas the apoE4 isoform has no effect. We further show that the protective effect of apoE is mediated by the formation of stable apoE/amyloid peptide complexes, as determined by tryptophan emission fluorescence measurements and by gel electrophoresis. The interaction specificity between apoE2 and apoE3 and the amyloid fragments is demonstrated here, since other apolipoproteins (e.g. apolipoprotein A-I and A-II), with similar amphipathic structures, do not interact with the amyloid C-terminal fragments. Finally, we show that, reciprocally, the amyloid peptide can interact directly with the apoE2 and apoE3 isoforms to decrease or perturb their normal association with lipids. These data suggest that the 29-40 and 29-42 domains of the amyloid peptide could be critical for the amyloid-apoE interaction, and that apoE2 and apoE3 isoforms, but not apoE4, could play a protective role against the formation of amyloid aggregates and/or against their interaction with cellular membranes. [less ▲]

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See detailInterleukin-1 Beta Induces Nuclear Factor Kappa B in Epithelial Cells Independently of the Production of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates
Bonizzi, Giuseppina; Dejardin, Emmanuel ULg; Piret, Bernard et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1996), 242(3), 544-9

A large body of work has been devoted to tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) signaling leading to the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B ... [more ▼]

A large body of work has been devoted to tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) signaling leading to the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) in various cell types. Several studies have indicated that NF-kappa B activation depends strictly on the production of reactive oxygen intermediates. In this report, we first demonstrated that IL-1 beta is a potent activator of NF-kappa B in various epithelial transformed cell lines (OVCAR-3, SKOV-3, MCF7 A/Z). In these cells, IL-1 beta rapidly induces NF-kappa B through a complete degradation of I kappa B-alpha, while H2O2 activates NF-kappa B with slower kinetics through a partial degradation of I kappa B-alpha, p100 and p105. We showed that IL-1 beta-mediated induction of NF-kappa B in OVCAR-3 and in other epithelial cell lines does not proceed through the production of reactive oxygen intermediates, while the same cytokine activates NF-kappa B in lymphoid cells through the intracellular generation of H2O2. Our study demonstrated that several signaling pathways lead to the activation of NF-kappa B, following IL-1 beta treatment in different cell types. [less ▲]

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See detailLipid-binding properties of synthetic peptide fragments of human apolipoprotein A-II.
Benetollo, C.; Lambert, Géraldine ULg; Talussot, C. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1996), 242(3), 657-64

Human apolipoprotein A-II (apo A-II) consists of three potential amphipathic helices of 17 residues each, which contribute to the lipid-binding properties of this apolipoprotein. The conformation and ... [more ▼]

Human apolipoprotein A-II (apo A-II) consists of three potential amphipathic helices of 17 residues each, which contribute to the lipid-binding properties of this apolipoprotein. The conformation and lipid-binding properties of these peptides, either as single-helix or as two-helix peptides, were investigated by turbidity, fluorescence, electron-microscopy and circular-dichroism measurements, and are compared in this article. The lipid affinity of shorter C-terminal segments of apo A-II was compared with those of the single-helix or two-helix peptides, to define the minimal peptide length required for stable complex formation. The properties of the apo-A-II-(13-48)-peptide were further compared with those of the same segment after deletion of the Ser31 and Pro32 residues, because the deleted apo-A-II-(13-30)-(33-48)-peptide, is predicted to form a long uninterrupted helix. The single helices of apo A-II could not form stable complexes with phospholipids, and the helix-turn-helix segment spanning residues 13-48 was not active either. The apo-A-II-(37-77)-peptide and the apo-A-II-(40-73)-peptide could form complexes with lipids, which appear as discoidal particles by negative-staining electron microscopy. The shortest C-terminal domain of apo A-II able to associate with lipids to form stable complexes was the apo-A-II-(40-73)-peptide, which consisted of the C-terminal helix, a beta-turn and part of the preceding helix. The shorter apo-A-II-(49-77)-peptide, and the helical apo-A-II-(13-30)-(33-48)-peptide, could also associate with phospholipids. The complexes formed were, however, less stable, as they dissociated outside the transition temperature range of the phospholipid. These data suggest that the C-terminal pair of helices of apo A-II, which is the most hydrophobic pair, is responsible for the lipid-binding properties of the entire protein. The N-terminal pair of helices of apo A-II at residues 13-48 does not associate tightly with lipids. The degree of internal similarity and the cooperativity between the helical segments of apo A-II is thus less pronounced than in apo A-I or apo A-IV. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of apo A-II appear to behave as two distinct entities with regard to lipid-protein association. [less ▲]

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See detailNF-kappaB transcription factor and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are activated by methylene blue photosensitization
Piret, Bernard; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie ULg; Sappey, Christine et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1995)

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See detailErratum for : primary structure of the streptomyces R61 extracellular DD-peptidase. 1. Cloning into Streptomyces lividans and nucleotide sequence of the gene
Duez, Colette ULg; Piron-Fraipont, C.; Joris, Bernard ULg et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1994), 224(3), 1079

This is the correction of the fig. 5 of Primary structure of the Streptomyces R61 extracellular DD-peptidase. 1. Cloning into Streptomyces Zividuns and nucleotide sequence of the gene, by C. Duez, C ... [more ▼]

This is the correction of the fig. 5 of Primary structure of the Streptomyces R61 extracellular DD-peptidase. 1. Cloning into Streptomyces Zividuns and nucleotide sequence of the gene, by C. Duez, C. Piron-Fraipont, B. Joris, J. Dusart, M. S. Urdea, J. A. Martial, J.-M. Frère and J.-M. Ghuysen. European Journal of Biochemistry Volume 162, Issue 3, pages 509–518, February 1987 [less ▲]

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See detailStability and Structural Analysis of Alpha-Amylase from the Antarctic Psychrophile Alteromonas Haloplanctis A23
Feller, Georges ULg; Payan, F.; Theys, F. et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1994), 222(2), 441-7

The alpha-amylase secreted by the antarctic bacterium Alteromonas haloplanctis displays 66% amino acid sequence similarity with porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase. The psychrophilic alpha-amylase is however ... [more ▼]

The alpha-amylase secreted by the antarctic bacterium Alteromonas haloplanctis displays 66% amino acid sequence similarity with porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase. The psychrophilic alpha-amylase is however characterized by a sevenfold higher kcat and kcat/Km values at 4 degrees C and a lower conformational stability estimated as 10 kJ.mol-1 with respect to the porcine enzyme. It is proposed that both properties arise from an increase in molecular flexibility required to compensate for the reduction of reaction rates at low temperatures. This is supported by the fast denaturation rates induced by temperature, urea or guanidinium chloride and by the shift towards low temperatures of the apparent optimal temperature of activity. When compared with the known three-dimensional structure of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase, homology modelling of the psychrophilic alpha-amylase reveals several features which may be assumed to be responsible for a more flexible, heat-labile conformation: the lack of several surface salt bridges in the (beta/alpha)8 domain, the reduction of the number of weakly polar interactions involving an aromatic side chain, a lower hydrophobicity associated with the increased flexibility index of amino acids forming the hydrophobic clusters and by substitutions of proline for alanine residues in loops connecting secondary structures. The weaker affinity of the enzyme for Ca2+ (Kd = 44 nM) and for Cl- (Kd = 1.2 mM at 4 degrees C) can result from single amino acid substitutions in the Ca(2+)-binding and Cl(-)-binding sites and can also affect the compactness of alpha-amylase. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification Of Functional-Sites On Bovine Leukemia-Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Using Structural And Immunological Data
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