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See detailTo settle or to move? The interplay between two classes of cyclic lipopeptides in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas CMR12a
D’aes, J.; Phuong Kieu, N.; Leclère, V. et al

in Environmental Microbiology (2014), In press

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See detailThe protein folding challenge in psychrophiles: facts and current issues
Piette, Florence ULg; Struvay, Caroline ULg; Feller, Georges ULg

in Environmental Microbiology (2011), 13

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See detailDistribution and evolution of ferripyoverdine receptors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Bodilis, Josselin; Ghysels, Bart ULg; Osayande, Julie et al

in Environmental microbiology (2009), 11(8), 2123-35

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous gram-negative bacterium, which is also able to cause severe opportunistic infections in humans. The colonization of the host is importantly affected by the ... [more ▼]

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous gram-negative bacterium, which is also able to cause severe opportunistic infections in humans. The colonization of the host is importantly affected by the production of the high-affinity iron (III) scavenging peptidic siderophore pyoverdine. The species P. aeruginosa can be divided into three subgroups ('siderovars'), each characterized by the production of a specific pyoverdine and receptor (FpvA). We used a multiplex PCR to determine the FpvA siderovar on 345 P. aeruginosa strains from environmental or clinical origin. We found about the same proportion of each type in clinical strains, while FpvA type I was slightly over-represented (49%) in environmental strains. Our multiplex PCR also detected the presence or absence of an additional receptor for type I pyoverdine (FpvB). The fpvB gene was in fact present in the vast majority of P. aeruginosa strains (93%), regardless of their siderovar or their origin. Finally, molecular analyses of fpvA and fpvB genes highlighted a complex evolutionary history, probably linked to the central role of iron acquisition in the ecology and virulence of P. aeruginosa. [less ▲]

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See detailSurfactin and fengycin lipopeptides of Bacillus subtilis as elicitors of induced systemic resistance in plants
Ongena, MARC ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg; Adam, Akram ULg et al

in Environmental Microbiology (2007), 9(4), 1084-1090

Multiple strains of Bacillus spp. were demonstrated to stimulate plant defence responses. However, very little is known about the nature of molecular determinants secreted by these Gram-positive bacteria ... [more ▼]

Multiple strains of Bacillus spp. were demonstrated to stimulate plant defence responses. However, very little is known about the nature of molecular determinants secreted by these Gram-positive bacteria that are responsible for the elicitation of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) phenomenon. This study shows that the lipopeptides surfactins and fengycins may be involved in this elicitation process. In bean, pure fengycins and surfactins provided a significant ISR-mediated protective effect on bean plants, similar to the one induced by living cells of the producing strain S499. Moreover, experiments conducted on bean and tomato plants showed that overexpression of both surfactin and fengycin biosynthetic genes in the naturally poor producer Bacillus subtilis strain 168 was associated with a significant increase in the potential of the derivatives to induce resistance. In tomato cells, key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway appeared to be activated in resistant plants following induction by lipopeptide overproducers. To our knowledge, such lipopeptides constitute a novel class of compounds from non-pathogenic bacteria that can be perceived by plant cells as signals to initiate defence mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailPseudomonas aeruginosa displays an epidemic population structure.
Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Cochez, Christel et al

in Environmental microbiology (2002), 4(12), 898-911

Bacteria can have population structures ranging from the fully sexual to the highly clonal. Despite numerous studies, the population structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is still somewhat contentious. We ... [more ▼]

Bacteria can have population structures ranging from the fully sexual to the highly clonal. Despite numerous studies, the population structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is still somewhat contentious. We used a polyphasic approach in order to shed new light on this issue. A data set consisting of three outer membrane (lipo)protein gene sequences (oprI, oprL and oprD), a DNA-based fingerprint (amplified fragment length polymorphism), serotype and pyoverdine type of 73 P. aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates, collected across the world, was analysed using biological data analysis software. We observed a clear mosaicism in the results, non-congruence between results of different typing methods and a microscale mosaic structure in the oprD gene. Hence, in this network, we also observed some clonal complexes characterized by an almost identical data set. The most recent clones exhibited serotypes O1, 6, 11 and 12. No obvious correlation was observed between these dominant clones and habitat or, with the exception of some recent clones, geographical origin. Our results are consistent with, and even clarify, some seemingly contradictory results in earlier epidemiological studies. Therefore, we suggest an epidemic population structure for P. aeruginosa, comparable with that of Neisseria meningitidis, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. [less ▲]

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