References of "Environment & Planning B : Planning & Design"
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See detailAssessing wind comfort in urban planning
Reiter, Sigrid ULg

in Environment & Planning B : Planning & Design (2010), 37(5), 857-873

There are increasing concerns regarding the quality of urban public spaces. Wind is one important environmental factor that influences pedestrians’ comfort and safety. In modern cities, there are more and ... [more ▼]

There are increasing concerns regarding the quality of urban public spaces. Wind is one important environmental factor that influences pedestrians’ comfort and safety. In modern cities, there are more and more high constructions and complex forms which can involve significant problems of wind discomfort around these buildings. Today, architects and town planners need guidelines and simple design tools to take account of wind in their projects. This paper addresses the progress made towards computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for assessing wind comfort in urban planning. We validated Fluent software for wind studies in urban environments by comparing our simulations results with wind tunnel tests. This validation shows that wind mean velocities around buildings can be simulated numerically with a very high degree of accuracy. Based on the results of a great number of CFD simulations, we developed a methodology and simple graphical tools to quantify critical wind speeds around buildings. This article should thus help in practice architects and town planners to design our built environment. Moreover, this paper shows how numerical modeling is now a high-performance tool to work out useful guidelines and simple design tools for urban planners. [less ▲]

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See detailComparing sky shape skeletons for the analysis of the visual dynamics along routes
Sarradin, François; Siret, Daniel; Couprie, Michel et al

in Environment & Planning B : Planning & Design (2007), 34/5

The motion of an observer in a given space produces a particular perception called motion perception. This has been defined by Gibson as the gradual changes in the rate of displacements of contour lines ... [more ▼]

The motion of an observer in a given space produces a particular perception called motion perception. This has been defined by Gibson as the gradual changes in the rate of displacements of contour lines in the visual field of the observer. This paper describes a new approach intended for analysing the motion perspective in order to quantify the morphology of urban open spaces along routes. It is based on spherical projections, which provide the shape of the sky boundary around the observer. The projections are studied through their skeletons, which are continuous sets of curves obtained by a progressive thinning down of the shapes around their main saliencies. The proposed method uses these skeletons to follow the variations in the shape of the sky boundary between the successive views. Measures of these variations have been developed and applied in a range of simplified theoretical examples and a real field example in order to show that they succeeded in capturing significant variations in spherical projections. [less ▲]

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See detailA spherical metric for the field-oriented analysis of complex urban open spaces
Teller, Jacques ULg

in Environment & Planning B : Planning & Design (2003), 30(3), 339-356

The author deals with the analysis of urban open spaces, once conceived as part and parcel of our urban heritage. He introduces a mathematical modelling technique that is capable of mapping the variation ... [more ▼]

The author deals with the analysis of urban open spaces, once conceived as part and parcel of our urban heritage. He introduces a mathematical modelling technique that is capable of mapping the variation of the sky visible from points distributed throughout space. The resulting maps overcome the limits of orthographic (plan, section, and elevation) and perspective methods of analysis by considering the dynamic qualities of the Gibsonian 'visual world' that takes account not only of bifocal vision but also of the relatively free movement of the head and shoulders, that is, vision as part of the human ecology. The maps show how-a person might experience those volumes of a void that define a space, not from a fixed point but from moving about inside the entire urban open space. [less ▲]

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