References of "English Text Construction"
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See detailSaying the unsayable: Imagining reconciliation in Gail Jones's Sorry
Belleflamme, Valérie-Anne ULiege

in English Text Construction (2015), 8(2), 159-176

In her novel Sorry (2007), Australian novelist and essayist Gail Jones engages in a reflection on the ethics of reconciliation. Written in response to her wish to acknowledge the debt to the Stolen ... [more ▼]

In her novel Sorry (2007), Australian novelist and essayist Gail Jones engages in a reflection on the ethics of reconciliation. Written in response to her wish to acknowledge the debt to the Stolen Generations, Sorry offers new possibilities of ethical mourning, allowing the dead to return and the voiceless to speak. This article explores the ways in which Jones not only fashions a narrative that bypasses the unsayable dimension of Australia’s history and the representational difficulties inherent in trauma but also fosters the empathetic imagination through a metadiscursive discussion of the act of reading. Self-referentiality and self-reflexivity are also examined, as they allow Jones to draw attention to her novel’s writerly elaborations and offer an alternative to standard reconciliation practices. [less ▲]

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See detailMartin Hilpert, Construction Grammar and its Application to English
Brems, Lieselotte ULiege

in English Text Construction (2015), 8(1), 132-136

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See detailReview of I. Mindt (2011) Adjective complementation: An empirical analysis of adjectives followed by that-clauses
Van linden, An ULiege

in English Text Construction (2014), 7(2), 290299

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See detailReview Contrastive Pragmatics. 2011. Amsterdam/ Philadelphia: John Benjamins. ISBN 978 90 272 2260 2. 182 pp.
Brems, Lieselotte ULiege

in English Text Construction (2013), 2(6), 301-305

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See detailIntroduction to special issue 'Intersections of Intersubjectivity'
Brems, Lieselotte ULiege; Ghesquière, Lobke; Van de Velde, Freek

in English Text Construction (2012), 5(1), 1-6

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See detailIntersubjectivity and intersubjectification: Typology and operationalization
Ghesquière, Lobke; Brems, Lieselotte ULiege; Van de velde, Freek

in English Text Construction (2012), 5(1), 128-152

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See detailRe-membering the Clichés: Memory and Stereotypes in Baraka's The Slave, Fuller's A Soldier's Play and Hansberry's Les Blancs
Gabrielle, Cindy ULiege

in English Text Construction (2009), 2(1), 146-156

These days authors who use stereotypical characters such as the African woman warrior or the old field slave smoking his pipe and humming blues songs, would probably be considered as intellectually biased ... [more ▼]

These days authors who use stereotypical characters such as the African woman warrior or the old field slave smoking his pipe and humming blues songs, would probably be considered as intellectually biased or mentally colonized. Yet, it is also the case that, for some African American writers like Amiri Baraka, Charles Fuller and Lorraine Hansberry, these characters represent a link between Black people and their past or, to use Pierre Nora’s term, they are lieux de mémoire. This is why these authors oppose the more or less general attitude which consists in dismissing these clichéd-figures from the field of representation, for this would amount to erasing an entire the inception segment of African American history. Going against the trend of the time, these playwrights thus give a voice to those silenced by normative history and, to decolonize symbols which after all belong to the past of Black people, Baraka in The Slave (1964), Fuller in A Soldier's Play (1981) and Hansberry in Les Blancs (1966) also invest these characters with a new significance. [less ▲]

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See detailIdeology in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus (2003)
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in English Text Construction (2009), 2(1), 121-131

This article focuses on the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus (2003). It examines how religious prejudice is encoded in the account of the book’s autodiegetic ... [more ▼]

This article focuses on the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus (2003). It examines how religious prejudice is encoded in the account of the book’s autodiegetic narrator, a fifteen-year-old girl whose father is a violent, extremist Igbo Catholic. Based on a close reading of the text, the essay argues that an analysis of the novel’s use of speech and thought presentation may contribute to the assessment of the main character’s evolving ideological stance. It is suggested that the resulting appraisal of the narrator’s development provides key insights into the interpretation of the book. [less ▲]

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See detailActivity-oriented and characteristic-oriented constructions: The distribution of voice in the history of the post-adjectival infinitive
Van linden, An ULiege

in English Text Construction (2008), 1(2), 239266

This paper is a diachronic study of post-adjectival infinitive constructions with adjectives denoting goodness, fitness, or necessity. Traditionally these constructions are analysed as tough-constructions ... [more ▼]

This paper is a diachronic study of post-adjectival infinitive constructions with adjectives denoting goodness, fitness, or necessity. Traditionally these constructions are analysed as tough-constructions. They can be divided into two semantically and syntactically distinct types, viz. activity-oriented and characteristic-oriented constructions. This distinction can be used to explain the variation in clausal voice type that is found with the post-adjectival constructions from the Late Middle English period onwards. In addition, a distinction needs to be made between adjectives expressing necessity, which only occur in activity-oriented constructions, and those expressing goodness or fitness, which may occur in the two construction types. Voice variation is only meaningful for the latter type of adjectives: in characteristic-oriented constructions they tend to be construed with an active infinitive, whereas in activity-oriented constructions they appear with a passive infinitive. As such, the distinction between these construction types helps to explain formal properties of the post-adjectival infinitive construction. [less ▲]

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