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See detailA climate analysis tool for passive heating and cooling strategies in hot humid climate based on Typical Meteorological Year data sets
Nguyen, Anh Tuan ULg; Reiter, Sigrid ULg

in Energy & Buildings (2014), 68(Part C), 756-763

Through a newly developed climate analysis tool, this paper examines the potential of improving thermal comfort under the climates of Vietnam thanks to passive strategies. A Building climatic chart for ... [more ▼]

Through a newly developed climate analysis tool, this paper examines the potential of improving thermal comfort under the climates of Vietnam thanks to passive strategies. A Building climatic chart for Vietnamese was proposed based on Fanger’s theory [1] and the comfort zone of this chart was then extended by calculating the effects of passive heating and cooling strategies. Typical Meteorological Year weather data are used for extracting and graphically printing of hourly environmental parameters on the psychrometric chart and for climate analysis, subsequently. The limitation and the scope of this method are also specified. The climates of three climatic regions in Vietnam have been used as case studies using all year, seasonal and monthly analysis. The results show that natural ventilation is an effective cooling solution as thermal comfort improvement varies with the climatic zones, increasing from 24.8% in Hanoi, 22.1% in Danang to 32.0% in Hochiminh city. Meanwhile, passive solar heating is only effective under the climate of Hanoi. Direct evaporative cooling also shows great cooling potential for comfort improvement but probable elevated humidity is not expected. Total possible comfort in a year of each location indicates that further climate modification methods are inevitable to achieve comfort during extreme weather conditions, especially in Hanoi. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial Planning as a driver of change in mobility and residential energy consumption
Dujardin, Sébastien; Marique, Anne-Françoise ULg; Teller, Jacques ULg

in Energy & Buildings (2014), 68

This paper analyses the impact of territorial structures upon energy consumption in the Walloon Region (Belgium). The rationale for this research is to consider the long-term influence of spatial planning ... [more ▼]

This paper analyses the impact of territorial structures upon energy consumption in the Walloon Region (Belgium). The rationale for this research is to consider the long-term influence of spatial planning decisions upon energy consumption in both residential building stock and home-to-work commuting. The analysis has been conducted on a regional scale (16,844 km2) and includes urban, peri-urban and rural settlements. Those settlements that perform well in mobility also appear to perform well in terms of building energy consumption. Even though this is not generally the case, it further reveals that some rural settlements characterized by low density show good performance in terms of energy efficiency. This permits a much more progressive approach in terms of spatial planning, whereby compact cities may be viewed as part of the solution, albeit not the whole solution. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation on a ventilation heat recovery exchanger: Modeling and experimental validation in dry and partially wet conditions
Gendebien, Samuel ULg; Bertagnolio, Stéphane ULg; Lemort, Vincent ULg

in Energy & Buildings (2013), 62

The present paper focuses on the development and experimental validation of a model of air-to-air heat exchanger dedicated to domestic mechanical heat recovery ventilation. The proposed model describes ... [more ▼]

The present paper focuses on the development and experimental validation of a model of air-to-air heat exchanger dedicated to domestic mechanical heat recovery ventilation. The proposed model describes dry and partially wet regimes. The first part of the paper presents a semi-empirical model based on the physical characteristics of the heat recovery device and relying on empirical correlations available in the literature for the convective heat transfer coefficients. In the case of partially wet regime, a moving boundary model is applied in order to predict sensible and latent heat transfer rates. A model developed with friction factor coefficients estimated by correlations from the literature is also presented in order to predict the hydraulic performance in dry conditions. The second part of the paper describes the experimental investigation conducted on an off-the-shelf heat exchanger. Experimental data are used to tune correlations for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient and validate the proposed simulation model of the ventilation heat recovery exchanger in partially wet conditions. The model developed to determine the hydraulic performance with existing correlations for the friction factor coefficient does not require a calibration. Finally, examples of use of the developed model are presented, which includes coupling the model with a building simulation model, a study of the influence of the humidity on the evolution of the latent and sensible heat transfer rates and strategies to avoid freezing in the heat exchanger. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of occupant behaviours on residential heating consumption for detached houses in a temperate climate of the northern part of Europe
de Meester, Tatiana; Marique, Anne-Françoise ULg; De Herde, André et al

in Energy & Buildings (2013), 57

The occupants' behaviour has a great influence on the energy demand, management and consumption of a building. This paper investigates the influence of three parameters related to human behaviour through ... [more ▼]

The occupants' behaviour has a great influence on the energy demand, management and consumption of a building. This paper investigates the influence of three parameters related to human behaviour through their modes of occupations (based on family size, management of the heating system and management of the heated area) on the housing heating loads of a standard dwelling in Belgium. Seven levels of insulation were tested: no insulation, two intermediate levels corresponding to 3 and 6 cm of insulation, the current standard for new buildings in Belgium, the low energy standard, the very low energy standard and the passive house standard. Multi-zone simulations were performed with a dynamic thermal simulation software. The impact of occupants' lifestyle and the interactions between occupation modes and insulation levels are highlighted. These results prove that the more the building is insulated, the more the lifestyle proportionally influences the heating loads. One important strategy for reducing heating consumption during the whole life cycle of the building is adapting the size of the house and its occupation modes to the evolution of family size. However, insulation is paramount, and increasing the insulation of the house provides generally better results than merely adapting the occupation mode. [less ▲]

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See detailImpacts of occupant behaviours on residential heating consumption for detached houses in a temperate climate of the northern part of Europe
de Meester, Tatiana; Marique, Anne-Françoise ULg; De Herde, André et al

in Energy & Buildings (2013), 57

The occupants' behaviour has a great influence on the energy demand, management and consumption of a building. This paper investigates the influence of three parameters related to human behaviour through ... [more ▼]

The occupants' behaviour has a great influence on the energy demand, management and consumption of a building. This paper investigates the influence of three parameters related to human behaviour through their modes of occupations (based on family size, management of the heating system and management of the heated area) on the housing heating loads of a standard dwelling in Belgium. Seven levels of insulation were tested: no insulation, two intermediate levels corresponding to 3 and 6 cm of insulation, the current standard for new buildings in Belgium, the low energy standard, the very low energy standard and the passive house standard. Multi-zone simulations were performed with a dynamic thermal simulation software. The impact of occupants' lifestyle and the interactions between occupation modes and insulation levels are highlighted. These results prove that the more the building is insulated, the more the lifestyle proportionally influences the heating loads. One important strategy for reducing heating consumption during the whole life cycle of the building is adapting the size of the house and its occupation modes to the evolution of family size. However, insulation is paramount, and increasing the insulation of the house provides generally better results than merely adapting the occupation mode. [less ▲]

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See detailThermal Monitoring and Indoor temperature modeling in vernacular buildings of north-East India
Singh, Manoj Kumar ULg; Mahapatra, Sadhan; Atreya, S.K. et al

in Energy & Buildings (2010), 42(10), 1610-1618

Vernacular architecture is still very popular and constructed widely in North-East India. In this paper, the result of long-term monitoring of two vernacular houses selected one in Tezpur (warm and humid ... [more ▼]

Vernacular architecture is still very popular and constructed widely in North-East India. In this paper, the result of long-term monitoring of two vernacular houses selected one in Tezpur (warm and humid climate) and other one in Cherrapunjee (cold and cloudy climate) are presented. Long-term monitoring work includes the measurements of temperature (inside and outside house), relative humidity (inside and outside house) and illumination level (inside and outside house) for 25 days in all the seasons (January: winter, April: spring/pre-summer, July: summer/monsoon and October: autumn/pre-winter) of the year 2008. Temperatures profile across all the seasons represents strong daily and seasonal fluctuations. Formulae have been developed based on part of the monitoring data to predict the indoor maximum, average and minimum temperatures inside the same house occupied by the same family. The predicted formulae were developed based on the measured data for the month of January and July and were validated with the measured data of April and October months. It is found that the correlation coefficient (R2 value) is above 0.96 for all the six formulae for the entire monitoring period. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of Bio-climatic zones in North East India
Singh, Manoj Kumar ULg; Mahapatra, Sadhan; Atreya, S.K.

in Energy & Buildings (2007), 39(12), 1250-1257

This paper represents the very basic work of bio-climatic classification of north-east India into warm and humid, cool and humid and cold and cloudy zones. This classification is extremely useful to the ... [more ▼]

This paper represents the very basic work of bio-climatic classification of north-east India into warm and humid, cool and humid and cold and cloudy zones. This classification is extremely useful to the building design for wide range of objectives such as climate responsive building design, building energy conservation, thermal comfort, out door design conditions, etc. This classification is based on the meteorological data collected over a period of more than 30 years, from Regional Meteorological Centre, Guwahati, India from 30 stations spread all over the region. Psychometric charts are prepared for each bio-climatic zone to assess the potential of solar passive design strategies for residential buildings. [less ▲]

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See detailWind pressure distribution influence on natural ventilation for different incidences and environment densities
van Moeseke, G.; Gratia, E.; Reiter, Sigrid ULg et al

in Energy & Buildings (2005), 37

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (6 ULg)