References of "Emerging Infectious Diseases"
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See detailNatural intrauterine infection with Schmallenberg virus in malformed newborn calves: pathology and distribution of viral RNA
Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Sarlet, Michaël ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2014), 20(8),

We comprehensively surveyed morphologic alterations in calves naturally infected in utero by Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and born deformed. SBV-specific RNA was distributed unevenly in different tissues ... [more ▼]

We comprehensively surveyed morphologic alterations in calves naturally infected in utero by Schmallenberg virus (SBV) and born deformed. SBV-specific RNA was distributed unevenly in different tissues. Implications for diagnosic procedures are highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailUnexpected Brucella suis Biovar 2 Infection in a Dairy Cow, Belgium
Fretin, D; Mori, M; Czaplicki, G et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2013), 19(12), 2053-2054

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See detailEpizootic spread of emerging Schmallenberg virus in wild cervids, Belgium, fall 2011
Linden, Annick ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Volpe, Rosario ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(12), 2006-2008

The Schmallenberg virus emerged in summer-fall 2011 in North-West Europe. During the fall of 2011, the virus widely spread in red and roe deer populations living about 250 km from the emergence location.

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See detailSchmallenberg virus in domestic cattle, Belgium, 2012
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Kleijnen, Déborah ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(9), 1512-1514

The Schmallenberg virus emerged in summer-fall 2011 in North-West Europe. Nine months later, 91% of adult cattle living about 250 km from the emergence location tested positive for IgGs targeting the new ... [more ▼]

The Schmallenberg virus emerged in summer-fall 2011 in North-West Europe. Nine months later, 91% of adult cattle living about 250 km from the emergence location tested positive for IgGs targeting the new virus nucleoprotein. Further, the risk of infection of the fetus in an immunologically naive herd is 28%. [less ▲]

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See detailSchmallenberg virus in calf born at term with porencephaly, Belgium
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Hoffmann, Bernd; Dive, Marc et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(6), 1005-1006

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See detailMultidisciplinary and Evidence-based Method for Prioritizing Diseases of Food-producing Animals and Zoonoses
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Vandeputte, Sébastien ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(4),

To prioritize 100 animal diseases and zoonoses in Europe, we used a multicriteria decision-making procedure based on opinions of experts and evidence-based data. Forty international experts performed ... [more ▼]

To prioritize 100 animal diseases and zoonoses in Europe, we used a multicriteria decision-making procedure based on opinions of experts and evidence-based data. Forty international experts performed intracategory and intercategory weighting of 57 prioritization criteria. Two methods (deterministic with mean of each weight and probabilistic with distribution functions of weights by using Monte Carlo simulation) were used to calculate a score for each disease. Consecutive ranking was established. Few differences were observed between each method. Compared with previous prioritization methods, our procedure is evidence based, includes a range of fields and criteria while considering uncertainty, and will be useful for analyzing diseases that affect public health [less ▲]

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See detailClinical significance of Escherichia albertii
Ooka, Tadasuke; Seto, Kazuko; Linden, Annick ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(3), 488-492

Discriminating Escherichia albertii from other Enterobacteriaceae is diffi cult. Systematic analyses showed that E. albertii represents a substantial portion of strains currently identifi ed as eae ... [more ▼]

Discriminating Escherichia albertii from other Enterobacteriaceae is diffi cult. Systematic analyses showed that E. albertii represents a substantial portion of strains currently identifi ed as eae-positive Escherichia coli and includes Shiga toxin 2f–producing strains. Because E. albertii possesses the eae gene, many strains might have been misidentifi ed as enterohemorrhagic or enteropathogenic E. coli. [less ▲]

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See detailBrucella ceti infection in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, Cecile; Fretin, David et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 139(11), 254-7

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See detailInfluenza A strain-dependent pathogenesis in fatal H1N1 and H5N1 infections of mice
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Habyarimana, Jean ULg; Lambrecht, Bénédicte et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(4), 595-603

Two different influenza A viruses showing no pathogenicity towards the laboratory mouse were forced to evolve by serial passaging. Although both adapted viruses evoked diffuse alveolar damage and showed a ... [more ▼]

Two different influenza A viruses showing no pathogenicity towards the laboratory mouse were forced to evolve by serial passaging. Although both adapted viruses evoked diffuse alveolar damage and showed a similar 50% mouse lethal dose and the same peak lung concentration, they elicited dramatically different pathological signatures and ARDS courses. In the absence of any virus labeling, a histologist unaware of which infection he was looking at could readily distinguish infections caused by these two viruses. This suggests that fatal infections caused by different highly virulent influenza A viruses do not necessarily share the same pathogenesis. The different histological pictures shown here refute the hypothesis of a single, universal “cytokine storm” underlying all fatal influenzal diseases. Research is thus crucially needed to identify underlying sets of virulence markers and to examine whether it might be advantageous to tailor treatment to the influenza virus pathotype. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding sites of bluetongue virus vectors, Belgium
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(3), 575-576

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See detailBluetongue virus in wild deer, Belgium, 2005-2008
Linden, Annick ULg; Grégoire, Fabien ULg; Nahayo, A. et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(5), 833-836

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See detailCyprinid herpesvirus 3
Michel, Benjamin; Fournier, Guillaume; Lieffrig, François et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16

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See detailConcurrent chikungunya and dengue virus infections during simultaneous outbreaks, Gabon, 2007.
Leroy, Eric M.; Nkoghe Mba, Dieudonne ULg; Ollomo, Benjamin et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2009), 15(4), 591-3

An outbreak of febrile illness occurred in Gabon in 2007, with 20,000 suspected cases. Chikungunya or dengue-2 virus infections were identified in 321 patients; 8 patients had documented co-infections ... [more ▼]

An outbreak of febrile illness occurred in Gabon in 2007, with 20,000 suspected cases. Chikungunya or dengue-2 virus infections were identified in 321 patients; 8 patients had documented co-infections. Aedes albopictus was identified as the principal vector for the transmission of both viruses. [less ▲]

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See detailBluetongue Epidemiology in the European Union
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Berkvens, D.; Mellor, P. S.

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2008), 14(4), 539-544

Bluetongue (BT) is a reportable disease of considerable socioeconomic concern and of major importance in the international trade of animals and animal products. Before 1998, BT was considered an exotic ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue (BT) is a reportable disease of considerable socioeconomic concern and of major importance in the international trade of animals and animal products. Before 1998, BT was considered an exotic disease in Europe. From 1998 through 2005, at least 6 BT virus strains belonging to 5 serotypes (BTV-1, BTV-2, BTV-4, BTV-9, and BTV-16) were continuously present in the Mediterranean Basin. Since August 2006, BTV-8 has caused a severe epizootic of BT in northern Europe. The widespread recrudescence and extension of BTV-8 infections in northern Europe during 2007 suggest that requirements for BTV establishment may now be fulfilled in this area. In addition, the radial extension of BTV-8 across Europe increases the risk for an encounter between this serotype and others, particularly those that occur in the Mediterranean Basin, where vector activity continues for more of the year. This condition increases the risk for reassortment of individual BTV gene segments. [less ▲]

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See detailBluetongue in European lynx (Lynx lynx)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; De Clercq, Kris E.; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2008)

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See detailBluetongue in captive yaks.
Mauroy, Axel ULg; Guyot, Hugues ULg; De Clercq, Kris et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2008), 14(4), 675-6

In August 2006, several Northern European countries including Belgium reported their first cases of bluetongue (BT). Surprisingly, it was the first time that BT was diagnosed so far in the northern ... [more ▼]

In August 2006, several Northern European countries including Belgium reported their first cases of bluetongue (BT). Surprisingly, it was the first time that BT was diagnosed so far in the northern hemisphere (1). BT is a non contagious, arthropod borne animal disease. The causal virus belongs to the genus Orbivirus in the family Reoviridae. The genome of the bluetongue virus (BTV) consists of 10 segments of double-stranded RNA and 24 serotypes have been reported (2). Serotype 8 (BTV-8) was implied in the emergence in Belgium (3). All ruminant species are thought to be susceptible to BT (2) but lack of data remains for certain species. We report here laboratory confirmed clinical cases of BT in yaks. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular epidemiology of canine parvovirus, Europe
Decaro, Nicolas; Desario, Costantino; Addie, Diane D. et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2007), 13(8), 1222-1224

Canine parvovirus (CPV), which causes hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, has 3 antigenic variants: types 2a, 2b, and 2c. Molecular method assessment of the distribution of the CPV variants in Europe showed ... [more ▼]

Canine parvovirus (CPV), which causes hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, has 3 antigenic variants: types 2a, 2b, and 2c. Molecular method assessment of the distribution of the CPV variants in Europe showed that the new variant CPV-2c is widespread in Europe and that the viruses are distributed in different countries. [less ▲]

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See detailPlague and the human flea, Tanzania
Laudisoit, Anne ULg; Leirs, H.; Makundi, R. H. et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2007), 13(5), 687-693

Domestic fleas were collected in 12 villages in the western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Of these, 7 are considered villages with high plague frequency, where human plague was recorded during at least ... [more ▼]

Domestic fleas were collected in 12 villages in the western Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. Of these, 7 are considered villages with high plague frequency, where human plague was recorded during at least 6 of the 17 plague seasons between 1986 and 2004. In the remaining 5 villages with low plague frequency, plague was either rare or unrecorded. Pulex irritans, known as the human flea, was the predominant flea species (72.4%) in houses. The density of P. irritans, but not of other domestic fleas, was significantly higher in villages with a higher plague frequency or incidence. Moreover, the P. irritans index was strongly positively correlated with plague frequency and with the logarithmically transformed plague incidence. These observations suggest that in Lushoto District human fleas may play a role in plague epidemiology. These findings are of immediate public health relevance because they provide an indicator that can be surveyed to assess the risk for plague. [less ▲]

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See detailBluetongue in Belgium, 2006
Toussaint, J. F.; Sailleau, C.; Mast, J. et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2007), 13(4), 614-616

Bluetongue has emerged recently in Belgium. A bluetongue virus strain was isolated and characterized as serotype 8. Two new real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCRs (RT-qPCRs) that amplified 2 ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue has emerged recently in Belgium. A bluetongue virus strain was isolated and characterized as serotype 8. Two new real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCRs (RT-qPCRs) that amplified 2 different segments of bluetongue virus detected this exotic strain. These 2 RT-qPCRs detected infection earlier than a competitive ELISA for antibody detection. [less ▲]

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