References of "Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior"
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See detailMultiple fMRI system-level baseline connectivity is disrupted in patients with consciousness alterations
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Gomez, Francisco; Crone, Julia-Sophia et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (in press)

Introduction: In healthy conditions, group-level fMRI resting state analyses identify ten resting state networks (RSNs) of cognitive relevance. Here, we aim to assess the tennetwork model in severely ... [more ▼]

Introduction: In healthy conditions, group-level fMRI resting state analyses identify ten resting state networks (RSNs) of cognitive relevance. Here, we aim to assess the tennetwork model in severely brain-injured patients suffering from disorders of consciousness and to identify those networks which will be most relevant to discriminate between patients and healthy subjects. Methods: 300 fMRI volumes were obtained in 27 healthy controls and 53 patients in minimally conscious state (MCS), vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/ UWS) and coma. Independent component analysis (ICA) reduced data dimensionality. The ten networks were identified by means of a multiple template-matching procedure and were tested on neuronality properties (neuronal vs non-neuronal) in a data-driven way. Univariate analyses detected between-group differences in networks’ neuronal properties and estimated voxel-wise functional connectivity in the networks, which were significantly less identifiable in patients. A nearest-neighbor “clinical” classifier was used to determine the networks with high between-group discriminative accuracy. Results: Healthy controls were characterized by more neuronal components compared to patients in VS/UWS and in coma. Compared to healthy controls, fewer patients in MCS and VS/UWS showed components of neuronal origin for the left executive control network, default mode network (DMN), auditory, and right executive control network. The “clinical” classifier indicated the DMN and auditory network with the highest accuracy (85.3%) in discriminating patients from healthy subjects. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

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See detailModulating effect of COMT genotype on the brain regions underlying proactive control process during inhibition
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 50

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Genetic variability related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (Val158Met polymorphism) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of cognitive control functions. Methods. In an event-related fMRI study, a modified version of the Stroop task was administered to three groups of 15 young adults according to their COMT Val158Met genotype [Val/Val (VV), Val/Met (VM) and Met/Met (MM)]. Based on the theory of dual mechanisms of control (Braver, et al., 2007), the Stroop task has been built to induce proactive or reactive control processes according to the task context. Results. Behavioral results did not show any significant group differences for reaction times but Val allele carriers individuals are less accurate in the processing of incongruent items. fMRI results revealed that proactive control is specifically associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in carriers of the Met allele, while increased activity is observed in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in carriers of the Val allele. Conclusion. These observations, in keeping with a higher cortical dopamine level in MM individuals, support the hypothesis of a COMT Val158Met genotype modulation of the brain regions underlying proactive control, especially in frontal areas as suggested by Braver et al. [less ▲]

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See detailA Partial Least Squares Analysis of the self reference effect in Alzheimer's disease: A reply to Irish
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 54

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See detailBrain dead yet mind alive: A positron emission tomography case study of brain metabolism in Cotard’s syndrome
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49(7), 1997-1999

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See detailDifferential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

The present experiment aimed to investigate age differences in the neural correlates of familiarity and recollection, while keeping performance similar across age groups by varying task difficulty. Twenty ... [more ▼]

The present experiment aimed to investigate age differences in the neural correlates of familiarity and recollection, while keeping performance similar across age groups by varying task difficulty. Twenty young and twenty older adults performed an episodic memory task in an event-related fMRI design. At encoding, participants were presented with pictures, either once or twice. Then, they performed a recognition task, with a Remember/Know paradigm. A similar performance was observed for the two groups in the Easy condition for recollection and in the Hard condition for familiarity. Imaging data revealed the classic recollection-related and familiarity-related networks, common to young and older groups. In addition, we observed that some activity related to recollection (left frontal, left temporal, left parietal cortices and left parahippocampus) and familiarity (bilateral anterior cingulate, right frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus) was reduced in older compared to young adults. However, for recollection processes only, older adults additionally recruited the right precuneus, possibly to successfully compensate for their difficulties, as suggested by a positive correlation between recollection and precuneus activity. [less ▲]

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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer's disease: An fMRI study
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

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See detailLateralized processing of false memories and pseudoneglect in aging.
Schmitz, Rémy; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2012)

Aging is associated with higher propensity to false memories and decreased retrieval of previously studied items. When young adults perform on a lateralized version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM ... [more ▼]

Aging is associated with higher propensity to false memories and decreased retrieval of previously studied items. When young adults perform on a lateralized version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the right cerebral hemisphere (RH) is more sensitive than the left (LH) to false memories, suggesting hemispheric imbalance in the cerebral mechanisms supporting semantic and episodic memory processes. Since cerebral asymmetries tend to be reduced with age, we surmised that behavioral asymmetries in the generation of false memories would be diminished with aging. To probe this hypothesis, a lateralized version of the DRM paradigm was administered to old (OA) and young (YA) healthy adults. During the encoding phase, lists of semantically associated words were memorized. During the retrieval session, targets (previously seen words), lures (never seen strongly semantically related words) and distracters (never seen, unrelated words) were briefly displayed either in the left or right visual fields, thus primarily stimulating the RH or LH, respectively. Participants had to decide whether the word was previously studied (Old/New), but also whether they had a strong episodic recollection (Remember) or a mere feeling of familiarity (Know) about Old words. In line with our predictions, false memories were globally higher in OA than YA, and vivid false recollections (i.e. Remember responses) were higher when lures were presented in the RH in YA, but not in OA. Additionally, we found significant correlations between YA participants’ familiarity scores and leftward attentional bias as previously evidenced using a visuospatial landmark task [Schmitz, R., and Peigneux, P. (2011). Age-related changes in visual pseudoneglect. Brain and Cognition, 76(3), 382-389], an effect not present in OA. This result is in line with the hypothesis of an interplay between attentional resources allocated to visuospatial and memory processes, suggesting a memory pseudoneglect phenomenon that would be altered with aging. [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired Acquisition Of A Mirror-Reading Skill In Alzheimer’s Disease
Merbah, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2011), 47

Several studies using the mirror-reading paradigm have shown that procedural learning and repetition priming may be preserved in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (e.g., Deweer et al., 1994 ... [more ▼]

Several studies using the mirror-reading paradigm have shown that procedural learning and repetition priming may be preserved in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (e.g., Deweer et al., 1994). According to the classical interpretation, improved reading time for repeated words is sustained by a repetition priming effect, while procedural learning is demonstrated when this improvement is also observed for new words. Following Masson (1986), the hypothesis tested in the present study was that improved reading of new words could also be due to a repetition priming effect rather than to the acquisition of a mirror-reading skill. Indeed, because the same letters are presented throughout the task, a repetition priming effect for the letters could suffice to explain the improvement in performance. To test this hypothesis, we administered to 30 healthy young and elderly subjects and to 30 AD patients a new mirror-reading task in two phases: an acquisition phase comprising pseudo-words constructed with one part of the alphabet, and a test phase in which both pseudo-words constructed with the same part of the alphabet and pseudo-words constructed with another part of the alphabet were presented. If the new pseudo-words composed with repeated letters were read faster, it would reflect a repetition priming effect; if pseudo-words composed of ‘new’ letters were read faster, it would reflect a procedural learning effect. The results show comparable repetition priming effects in AD patients and in healthy elderly subjects, whereas only healthy subjects showed a procedural learning effect. These results suggest, contrary to previous studies, that the learning of a new perceptual skill may not always be preserved in AD. [less ▲]

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See detailSerial order short-term memory capacities and specific language impairment: No evidence for a causal association
Majerus, Steve ULg; Leclercq, Anne-Lise ULg; Grossman, Aurélie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2009), 45

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See detailComparison of inhibitory functioning in mild Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Amieva, Hélène; Adam, Stéphane ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2007), 43(7), 866-874

Executive dysfunction is frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More specifically, inhibitory dysfunction is observed early in AD and ... [more ▼]

Executive dysfunction is frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More specifically, inhibitory dysfunction is observed early in AD and inhibitory deficits are also prominent in patients with FTD. However, few studies have simultaneously explored and compared inhibitory abilities in both degenerative diseases. Consequently, the aim of this study was to compare verbal and motor inhibitory processes in the initial stages of AD and the frontal variant of FTD. Stroop and Go/No-go tasks were administered. The results demonstrate that, on the Go/No-go task, AD and FTD patients do not produce more errors than control subjects. However, both groups are impaired on the Stroop task (mainly with regard to the error score) but do not differ from each other. These results indicate that AD and FTD patients do not present a general impairment of their inhibitory abilities. Moreover, these two kinds of dementia present similar quantitative and qualitative inhibitory impairments on the two tasks, although their patterns of structural and functional cerebral impairments are known to be different. The presence of similar inhibitory deficits despite very different patterns of brain damage is in agreement with the hypothesis that inhibitory dysfunction in the two groups of patients depends on a disconnection process between anterior and posterior cerebral areas, rather than on the presence of focal metabolism decreases in different regions. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping the updating process: common and specific brain activations across different versions of the running span task
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2007), 43(1), 146-158

Neuroimaging studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning have only rarely investigated whether the non-executive characteristics of the experimental executive tasks could contribute ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning have only rarely investigated whether the non-executive characteristics of the experimental executive tasks could contribute to the observed brain activations. The aim of this study was to determine cerebral activity in three different tasks involving the updating executive function. The experimental updating tasks required subjects to process strings of items (respectively letters, words, and sounds) of unknown lengths, and then to recall or identify a specific number of presented items. Conjunction and functional connectivity analyses demonstrated that the cerebral areas activated by all three experimental tasks are the left frontopolar cortex, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortex, bilateral intraparietal sulcus, right inferior parietal lobule and cerebellum. Some regions of this network appear to be more specific to each updating task. These results clearly indicate that the neural substrates underlying a specific executive process (in this case, updating) are modulated by the exact requirements of the task (such as the material to process or the kind of response) and the specific cognitive processes associated with updating. [less ▲]

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See detailVariability in the impairments of recognition memory in patients with frontal lobe lesions
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Lekeu, Françoise ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2006), 42(7), 971-1058

Fourteen patients with frontal lobe lesions and 14 normal subjects were tested on a recognition memory task that required discriminating between target words, new words that are synonyms of the targets ... [more ▼]

Fourteen patients with frontal lobe lesions and 14 normal subjects were tested on a recognition memory task that required discriminating between target words, new words that are synonyms of the targets and unrelated distractors. A deficit was found in 12 of the patients. Moreover, three different patterns of recognition impairment were identified: (I) poor memory for targets, (II) normal hits but increased false recognitions for both types of distractors, (III) normal hit rates, but increased false recognitions for synonyms only. Differences in terms of location of the damage and behavioural characteristics between these subgroups were examined. An encoding deficit was proposed to explain the performance of patients in subgroup I. The behavioral patterns of the patients in subgroups II and III could be interpreted as deficient postretrieval verification processes and an inability to recollect item-specific information, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailNormal mere exposure effect with impaired recognition in Alzheimer's disease
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2002), 38(1), 77-86

We investigated the mere exposure effect and the explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and elderly control subjects, using unfamiliar faces. During the exposure phase, the subjects ... [more ▼]

We investigated the mere exposure effect and the explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and elderly control subjects, using unfamiliar faces. During the exposure phase, the subjects estimated the age of briefly flashed faces. The mere exposure effect was examined by presenting pairs of faces (old and new) and asking participants to select the face they liked. The participants were then presented with a forced-choice explicit recognition task. Controls subjects exhibited above-chance preference and recognition scores for old faces. The AD patients also showed the mere exposure effect but no explicit recognition. These results suggest that the processes involved in the mere exposure effect are preserved in AD patients despite their impaired explicit recognition. The results are discussed in terms of Seamon et al.'s (1995) proposal that processes involved in the mere exposure effect are equivalent to those subserving perceptual priming. These processes would depend on extrastriate areas which are relatively preserved in AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailExecutive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (1999), 35(1), 57-72

Executive functioning was examined in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 20 normal elderly subjects. The results showed that AD patients present lower performance compared to control subjects ... [more ▼]

Executive functioning was examined in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 20 normal elderly subjects. The results showed that AD patients present lower performance compared to control subjects in all executive tasks, confirming that some executive deficits may be present in the first stages of the disease. A factorial analysis suggested that these deficits can be related to two domains of the executive functions: the inhibition abilities and the capacity to co-ordinate simultaneously storage and processing of information. Moreover, the performance on these factors is correlated to different anterior and posterior cortical areas. [less ▲]

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See detailAcquisition of new concepts by two amnesic patients
Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Lorrain, D.

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (1994), 30(2), 305-317

Two Korsakoff amnesics (A.G. and G.S.) and two control subjects were taught six new concepts. Each concept was composed of three parts: the name of the concept, the context in which the concept originated ... [more ▼]

Two Korsakoff amnesics (A.G. and G.S.) and two control subjects were taught six new concepts. Each concept was composed of three parts: the name of the concept, the context in which the concept originated and its definition. The learning procedure consisted of two phases: (1) learning the concept names and definitions by means of the vanishing-cues method; (2) practice on examples of the concepts through a classification task: examples were either set in the same context as that given in the original definition or in mixed contexts (same and new contexts). Subjects were then tested after 24 hours, a week and a month on their ability to identify new examples as belonging to one of the conceptual rules studied (transfer tests). Both patients showed substantial learning. Patient A.G. was slow and dependent of the first letter cues in the vanishing-cues learning phase but nevertheless, she acquired a large and flexible conceptual knowledge and this was especially true for concepts that were practised by means of mixed-context examples. Patient G.S. easily learned to associate the definitions with the concept names but her conceptual knowledge remained more limited. These results confirm the existence of a semantic learning ability in amnesic patients. They also suggest that under appropriate learning conditions, amnesics may eventually acquire a new flexible conceptual knowledge. [less ▲]

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