References of "Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology"
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See detailFirst evidence of the possible implication of the 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) in immune activity of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis, L.): Comparison with cortisol
Mathieu, Cédric; Mila, Sylvain; Mandiki, Robert et al

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2013), 165(2), 149-158

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See detailEstradiol, a key endocrine signal in the sexual differentiation and activation of reproductive behavior in quail
Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2007, August), 148(Suppl. 1), 27

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See detailGenetical control of sympodial growth and flowering in tomato
Thouet, Johanna ULg; Ormenese, Sandra ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2006), 143(4), 170-171

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See detailControl of floral transition in maize
Van Kerkhoven, Fabrizio ULg; Jennès, Nicolas; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2006), 143(4), 170

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See detailCloning of CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS T in Sinapis alba.
Tamseddak, Karim; D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2006), 143A

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See detailRegulation of the mammalian heart function by nitric oxide.
MASSION, Paul ULg; Pelat, Michel; Belge, C. et al

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2005), 142(2), 144-50

The mammalian heart expresses all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in diverse cell types of the myocardium. Despite their apparent promiscuity, the NOS isoforms support specific signaling ... [more ▼]

The mammalian heart expresses all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in diverse cell types of the myocardium. Despite their apparent promiscuity, the NOS isoforms support specific signaling because of their subcellular compartmentation with colocalized effectors and limited diffusibility of NO in muscle cells. eNOS and nNOS sustain normal EC coupling and contribute to the early and late phases of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. They also attenuate the beta1-/beta2-adrenergic increase in inotropy and chronotropy, and reinforce the pre- and post-synaptic vagal control of cardiac contraction. By doing so, the NOS protect the heart against excessive stimulation by catecholamines, just as an "endogenous beta-blocker". In the ischemic and failing myocardium, induced iNOS further reinforces this effect, as does eNOS coupled to overexpressed beta3-adrenoceptors. nNOS expression also increases in the aging and infarcted heart, but its role (compensatory or deleterious) is less clear. In addition to their direct regulation of contractility, the NOS modulate oxygen consumption, substrate utilization, sensitivity to apoptosis, hypertrophy and regenerative potential, all of which illustrate the pleiotropic effects of this radical on the cardiac cell biology. [less ▲]

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See detailRegulation of the mammalian heart function by nitric oxide.
MASSION, Paul ULg; Pelat, Michel; Belge, C. et al

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2005), 142(2), 144-50

The mammalian heart expresses all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in diverse cell types of the myocardium. Despite their apparent promiscuity, the NOS isoforms support specific signaling ... [more ▼]

The mammalian heart expresses all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in diverse cell types of the myocardium. Despite their apparent promiscuity, the NOS isoforms support specific signaling because of their subcellular compartmentation with colocalized effectors and limited diffusibility of NO in muscle cells. eNOS and nNOS sustain normal EC coupling and contribute to the early and late phases of the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. They also attenuate the beta1-/beta2-adrenergic increase in inotropy and chronotropy, and reinforce the pre- and post-synaptic vagal control of cardiac contraction. By doing so, the NOS protect the heart against excessive stimulation by catecholamines, just as an "endogenous beta-blocker". In the ischemic and failing myocardium, induced iNOS further reinforces this effect, as does eNOS coupled to overexpressed beta3-adrenoceptors. nNOS expression also increases in the aging and infarcted heart, but its role (compensatory or deleterious) is less clear. In addition to their direct regulation of contractility, the NOS modulate oxygen consumption, substrate utilization, sensitivity to apoptosis, hypertrophy and regenerative potential, all of which illustrate the pleiotropic effects of this radical on the cardiac cell biology. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in major intracellular osmolytes in L-929 cells following rapid and slow application of hyperosmotic media.
Libioulle, Cécile ULg; Corbesier, L.; Gilles, Raymond ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2001), 130(3), 461-70

Cultured L-929 cells respond to media-made hyperosmotic (600 mOsmol/kg H2O) by addition of NaCl, sorbitol or proline by adjusting successively their intracellular level in different osmolytes: Na+, K ... [more ▼]

Cultured L-929 cells respond to media-made hyperosmotic (600 mOsmol/kg H2O) by addition of NaCl, sorbitol or proline by adjusting successively their intracellular level in different osmolytes: Na+, K+, amino acids and sorbitol. In the NaCl medium, Na+ and K+ are first to increase. Their concentration is then down-regulated while they are replaced by less disrupting osmolytes: amino acids and sorbitol. The amino-acid level is also adjusted with respect to the increase in sorbitol which starts only after 24 h, depending on the induction of aldose reductase. A similar evolution in the amount of these osmolytes is observed, with different time scales and amplitudes, depending on whether the osmotic shocks are applied abruptly or slowly, in a more physiological way. The interplay between the osmolytes is also different depending on their availability in the external medium. Such complex evolutions indicate that a cascade of interacting signals must be considered to account for the overall regulation process. It can hardly be fitted into a model implicating a single primary signalling event (early increase in ions or decrease in cell volume) as usually postulated. Also, the volume up-regulation is not significantly different in the different conditions, showing that it is not primarily dependent on the adjustment of the intracellular osmolarity which is reached immediately upon cell shrinkage and is maintained all over, independently of the availability and changes in nature of the osmolytes. [less ▲]

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See detailAdaptations of the hemoglobinless Antarctic icefish (Channichthyidae) to hypoxia tolerance
Feller, Georges ULg; Gerday, Charles ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (1997), 118(4), 981-987

Antarctic fish of the family Channichthyidae, or icefish, represent a unique model for the study of physiological and biochemical responses to chronic hypoxia since the genes coding for hemoglobin and ... [more ▼]

Antarctic fish of the family Channichthyidae, or icefish, represent a unique model for the study of physiological and biochemical responses to chronic hypoxia since the genes coding for hemoglobin and possible myoglobin are not expressed by these teleosts. Channichthyidae have developed outstanding cardio-vascular adaptations to accommodate the lack of these hemic pigments, most of them involving the myocardium. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Inc. [less ▲]

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