References of "Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparison of explant responses treated with leachate and leonardite sources of humic substances during in vitro rooting of woody plants.
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2016), 81(1), 158-165

As heterogeneous mixtures of compounds resulting from the physical, chemical and microbiological transformations of organic residues, humic substances (HS) are mostly recognized for their biostimulation ... [more ▼]

As heterogeneous mixtures of compounds resulting from the physical, chemical and microbiological transformations of organic residues, humic substances (HS) are mostly recognized for their biostimulation of plant growth that firstly involve the root development and architecture before further putative improvement of nutrients uptakes. To avoid the interferences currently reported from external origins, the successive steps of rooting have been carried out using shoots and isolated leaves of birch and alder vitro-plants. Extracts issued from landfill leachate (LHS) has been compared to a stable formulation from leonardite ("Humifirst" 12% humic acid 3% and fulvic acid) commercialized by TRADECORP company's (HHS). Chemical analysis showed that LHS source typically contain much higher N (mainly as ammonium (93%) and chloride concentration than HHS. Used at low concentration (10 ppm) during root induction/initiation phase, both HS sources may be slightly unfavorable to the root formation (21% of reduction in primary root number) of alder but not of birch. While, in root elongation phase, there is an increase in the primary root length and lateral root number. The direct effects of HS on in vitro root development vary from one species to another depending on the root treatment stage. Results showed that both explants type response are equivalent in the development of a complete rooting system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLINKING CATTLE GRAZING BEHAVIOR TO METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE DYNAMICS
Blaise, Yannick ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2016, February), 81(1), 107-112

Various methods are presently used to measure methane (CH4) emissions of ruminants on pasture. Those measurements are essential to evaluate nutritional strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions as well ... [more ▼]

Various methods are presently used to measure methane (CH4) emissions of ruminants on pasture. Those measurements are essential to evaluate nutritional strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions as well as addressing the selection of low producing individuals. On pasture and in the barn, variations in CH4 emissions are observed depending on the time of the day. However, no studies have been made to link these diurnal fluctuations to behavioural phases, especially on pasture. The aim of this study was to understand the individual dynamics of CH4 production and their links to the grazing behaviour. For this purpose, a new tool was specifically developed. Five red-pied dry cows were equipped with infrared CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors measuring concentrations in the exhaled air at 4 Hz. The animals were equipped with a heart rate belt (HR) and motion sensors to detect their feeding behaviours (grazing vs. rumination) for periods of 8 h/d. Wind speed (WS) was also monitor to verify interference with sampled gas concentrations. Results showed that using the CH4:CO2 ratio reduced the interference with WS that was observed on raw CH4 and CO2 concentration signals. CH4:CO2 ratio average over 5 min periods indicated that CH4 emissions were lower during grazing than rumination (P<0.01). The eructation frequency during grazing (0.48 eructation/min, P<0.01) was also lower than during rumination (0.65 eructation/min). HR was higher during grazing that rumination. Because HR is usually linked to metabolic CO2 production intensity, hence influencing the denominator of the CH4:CO2 ratio, further investigation should focus on the quantification of changes in fermentative and metabolic CO2 emissions along the day to estimate total CH4 production more accurately and the relationship between CH4 emissions patterns and post-feeding times. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 173 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEVALUATION OF THERMOTOLERANT ACETOBACTER PASTEURIANUS STRAINS ISOLATED FROM MOROCCAN FRUITS CATALYZING OXIDATIVE FERMENTATION AT HIGH TEMPERATURE.
Mounir, Majid ULg; Shafiei, R.; Zarmehrkhorshid, R. et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2015), 80(1), 37-43

Six strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated from Moroccan local products and their potential as industrial strains was evaluated in lab-bioreactor. Three of them, namely TAV01, AF01 and CV01 ... [more ▼]

Six strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated from Moroccan local products and their potential as industrial strains was evaluated in lab-bioreactor. Three of them, namely TAV01, AF01 and CV01, isolated from traditional apple vinegar, apple and cactus fruit, respectively were selected and their responses to high temperature were assessed. Morphological and biochemical identification confirmed that these strains belong to Acetobacter species. Their growth and acetic acid production were compared with the thermoresistant reference strain, Acetobacter senegalensis and mesophilic strains of Acetobacter pasteurianus. The two strains AF01 and CV01 showed abundant growth and noticeable acetic acid production ability at high temperatures (38 to 41 degrees C). A thermophilic character was observed for AF01 strain. Indeed, this bacterium grew better at 38 than 30 degrees C. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIMPLEMENTATION OF A METAL STRUCTURED PACKING IN A FUNGAL BIOFILM REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF A RECOMBINANT PROTEIN BY ASPERGILLUS ORYZAE
Zune, Quentin ULg; Delepierre, Anissa; Toye, Dominique ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014, February 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (14 ULg)
Full Text
See detailUsing micro-injection technique to assess fungal toxicity in mosquito control
Bawin, Thomas ULg; Boukraa, Slimane; Seye, Fawrou et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014, February 07), 79(1), 181-185

Topical application of insecticidal compounds allows directly exposing these substances on insect tissues and measuring their toxicity while ignoring many factors. However, this technique remains ... [more ▼]

Topical application of insecticidal compounds allows directly exposing these substances on insect tissues and measuring their toxicity while ignoring many factors. However, this technique remains difficult to apply on mosquito larvae considering their aquatic lifestyle. Micro-injection could be used for the direct deposition of toxic compounds in the larvae. Capillaries exhibiting an injection tip with an external diameter of 0.5 mm have been designed from silica tubes. For each treatment, a capillary is mounted on a pump connected to a flow rate regulator. Culex quinquefasciatus larvae were injected with 10^7 spores/ml of entomopathogenic fungi (Aspergillus clavatus, Metarhizium anisopliae, Metarhizium sp.). Mortalities were recorded daily during 72h. The distribution of spores stained with methylene blue and injected into the body of larvae was also observed according to the system described. Results showed that spores were distributed over the whole body. The injection of Aspergillus clavatus, Metarhizium anisopliae and Metarhizium sp spores induced corrected mortalities of 62%, 53% and 57% after 72h, and differed statistically from control groups. Finally, post-mortem emergences of filaments from dead larvae were observed in the case of the three fungal strains confirming spore viability. Injection of inactivated spores (or inert bodies of similar size) could help to reject the hypothesis of a response due to the presence of foreign bodies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhysico-chemical properties and aroma profile of Acacia Honey produced in Romania
Madas, Mariana-Niculina ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Marghitas, L.A. et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014, February 07), 79(1), 133-135

Detailed reference viewed: 170 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDevelopment of a colorimetric method for the dosage of OI- anions and I2 in aqueous media
Bafort, Françoise ULg; Barthelemy, Jean-Paul ULg; Parisi, Olivier ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(1), 155-160

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (25 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA volatile sex pheromone in the invasive ladybeetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(1), 79-81

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (32 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailYearly Follow-up of Methane Turbulent Exchange Over an Intensively Grazed Pasture in Belgium
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(1), 91-96

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessing the foraging behavior of Agriotes sordidus wireworms in dual-choice olfactometers
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Fiers, Marie; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2014), 79(2), 151-156

The different steps of the foraging process of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) would be better understood if accurate and holistic information regarding the role of plant-produced chemicals ... [more ▼]

The different steps of the foraging process of wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) would be better understood if accurate and holistic information regarding the role of plant-produced chemicals constituting their environment were available. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) play important roles in the interactions between plants and insects in many ecosystems, whether they take place aboveground or belowground. The roles of VOC are still relatively unknown for wireworms, and deserve attention. Here, we performed three experimentations with barley roots as baits. In the two first, we assessed the effect of chopped roots and fungus infected roots on the orientation of wireworms. In the third experiment, the larvae were confronted to both healthy and fungus infected roots. We discuss the results in terms of suitability of the olfactometers we designed for the investigation of olfaction in wireworms, and we provide suggestions to improve their use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSilky bent grass resistance to herbicides: one year of monitoring in Belgium
Henriet, François; Bodson, Bernard ULg; Meza Morales, Walter ULg

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013, May 21), 78(3), 665-670

Silky bent grass (Apera spica-venti (L.) P. Beauv.) is a common weed of cereal crops widely spread in Northern and Easthern Europe (Germany, Czech Republic, ...), Northern Asia, Sibera and Canada. Up to ... [more ▼]

Silky bent grass (Apera spica-venti (L.) P. Beauv.) is a common weed of cereal crops widely spread in Northern and Easthern Europe (Germany, Czech Republic, ...), Northern Asia, Sibera and Canada. Up to now, no resistant case has been detected in Belgium but some chemical weeding failures have been observed in Wallonia fields. During summer 2011, 37 seed samples of Apera spica-venti were collected in Wallonia and submitted to resistance tests in controlled conditions. Three modes of action were tested: acetyl coenzyme-A carboxylase inhibitors (pinoxaden and cycloxydim), acetolactate synthase inhibitores (mesosulfuron+iodosulfuron, pytroxsulam and sulfometuron) and photosynthesis inhibitors (isoproturon). One susceptible standard population was included in the test in order to validate it and to permit wild populations classification according to "R" rating system developed by Moss et al (2007). Most of populations were susceptible but some populations showed resistance to at least one of the three tested modes of action. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHigh-speed imaging use to predict spray retention on barley leaves
Boukhalfa, Hassina dite Hafida ULg; Massinon, Mathieu ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013, May 21), Vol 78(2)(1-386 (2013)), 31-36

Laboratory studies were conducted to validate the effectiveness of the use of high-speed imaging method to replace chemical nalysis by fluoremetrie. Measurements were performed with a high-speed camera ... [more ▼]

Laboratory studies were conducted to validate the effectiveness of the use of high-speed imaging method to replace chemical nalysis by fluoremetrie. Measurements were performed with a high-speed camera coupled with a retro-LED lighting. Size and velocity of the drop were extracted by image analysis. Drop impact types were determined by the operator. Drops were produced with a flat-fan nozzle mounted on a movable ramp. Two surfactants (Break-Thru® S240 and Li700 ®) were sprayed on BBCH 12 barley leaves to highlight the effect of the reduction of surface tension. Relative volume proportions were computed within of an energy scale divided into 11 classes based on the Weber number. results are compared to the results of the chemical analysis by spectrofluerometry. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (37 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDevelopment of an experimental device allowing plant-plant interaction studies and in situ dynamic trapping of volatile organic compounds emitted by barley (Hordeum distichon L.) roots
Delory, Benjamin ULg; Delaplace, Pierre ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013, February 08), 78(1), 97-102

In response to wounding or herbivore attack, leaves and roots of higher plants release volatile organic compounds (VOCs). To date, VOCs analysis and plant−plant interaction studies have been mainly ... [more ▼]

In response to wounding or herbivore attack, leaves and roots of higher plants release volatile organic compounds (VOCs). To date, VOCs analysis and plant−plant interaction studies have been mainly performed on aboveground plant tissues, leaving the roles played by root VOCs in plant−plant interaction unexplored. In this context, this project aims at setting up an original experimental device allowing both dynamic trapping of VOCs emitted by mechanically damaged H. distichon roots and the study of the roles played by root VOCs in intra and interspecific plant−plant interactions. The experimental device consists of Barley seedlings cultivated in closed PTFE reactors filled with wet sand. Before being analysed by gas chromatography−mass spectrometry, root VOCs are trapped via a dynamic system on Tenax cartridges using a charcoal-filtered and humidified air. Preliminary results show that 7 day-old wounded Barley roots emit C9 fatty acid derivatives (E-non-2-enal and nona-2,6-dienal) as major compounds, contrasting with aboveground plant tissues that mainly emit C6 alcohols, aldehydes, and their derivative esters. For plant−plant interaction studies, receiver plants are exposed to an airflow enriched with VOCs from root damaged Barley plants of the same age. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 181 (35 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong term measurements of volatile organic compounds exchanges above a maize field at Lonzee (Belgium)
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; SALERNO, Giovanni ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013, February), 78(1), 127-132

VOC (volatile organic compounds) include a wide set of molecules which are mostly emitted by the plants. Atmospheric scientists are strongly interested in these compounds because of their important role ... [more ▼]

VOC (volatile organic compounds) include a wide set of molecules which are mostly emitted by the plants. Atmospheric scientists are strongly interested in these compounds because of their important role in the atmospheric chemistry and their final impact on air pollution and climate change. Evaluation of current and future VOC emissions is thus necessary and requires a comprehensive understanding of VOC production and exchange dynamics under a wide panel of climatic conditions and ecosystems. Forest and non pastured grasslands have been largely studied for the last decade. However, knowledge about VOC fluxes from croplands remains scarce. Our study focuses on the VOC exchanges between a maize field and the atmosphere. It is incorporated in a wider project that aims to study VOC fluxes from two croplands (maize and winter wheat) and a pastured grassland. VOC fluxes have been measured on a maize field during the whole growing season using a micrometeorological method (eddy covariance). While first results show half-hourly bidirectionnal exchanges among all the preselected compounds, in average methanol stands for the greatest emitted VOC, followed by green leaf volatiles, and acetic acid is the greatest taken up VOC. Small isoprene and monoterpenes fluxes are also observed. A diurnal pattern is found for all those VOC, with greater emission/uptake during the day, suggesting a flux dependence on environmental parameters. These environmental controls will be further investigated [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 162 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDevelopment of a test to assess the Banana Bunchy Top Virus transmissibility through direct analysis of its aphid vector Pentalonia nigronervosa
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg; Lepoivre, Philippe ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013), 78(1), 49-54

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy on the sensitivity of three oat varieties to the saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
Censier, Florence ULg; Chavalle, Sandrine ULg; San Martin y Gomez, Gilles et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2013), 78(2), 287-292

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser, 1840) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae feed on stems and attractive saddle-shaped depressions, driving to ... [more ▼]

The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser, 1840) is a univoltine pest of cereals which occurs in Europe. The larvae feed on stems and attractive saddle-shaped depressions, driving to important yield losses when the galls are numerous. After 40 years without any reporting, large populations of H. marginata and important damage have been observed since 2010 in wheat crops in Belgium, especially in the Flemish Polders where clay soils and intensive farming of cereals favour heavy infestations. According to some research conducted in the 1960s during the last outbreak, oat (Avena sativa L.) is known to be one of the less favourable hosts to the saddle gall midge. Our study was performed in order to assess the host sensitivity of three oat varieties currently grown in Belgium: EVITA, EFFEKTIV and FREDDY. Therefore, oat varieties were sown on infested soil in two separate enclosures in a glasshouse. In the first enclosure, only the three oat varieties were grown; in the second one, these three oat varieties were grown together with two varieties of spring wheat: GRANNY and KWS CHAMSIN. Two parameters were measured: the percentage of leaves with laid eggs, and the number of galls per stem. The percentage of leaves with eggs showed that the infestation was significantly lower on oats when they were in presence of wheat. The egg infestation was also significantly higher on wheat than on oat, which means oat is a much less favourable host plant than spring wheat for egg laying. Oat varieties were significantly different from each other regarding the number of galls per stem, but with very little damage compared to wheat. The FREDDY variety even seemed to be completely resistant to saddle gall midge, as no galls were observed although there was a similar percentage of leaves with eggs for the three oat varieties. Cropping oat could thus contribute to reduce infestations of H. marginata. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of mechanical weeding on wild Chamomile populations in winter wheat crop
Jaunard, Delphine ULg; Monty, Arnaud ULg; Henriet, François et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012, May 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEstimation of genetic parameters for methane indicator traits based on milk fatty acids in dual purpose Belgian blue cattle
Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012, February 10), 77(1), 21-25

The genetic parameters of CH4 indicators were estimated by single trait test-day models from 16,825 records collected on Walloon Dual Purpose Belgium Blue cows in their first 3 lactations. Fatty acid ... [more ▼]

The genetic parameters of CH4 indicators were estimated by single trait test-day models from 16,825 records collected on Walloon Dual Purpose Belgium Blue cows in their first 3 lactations. Fatty acid based CH4 indicators published in the literature were predicted from milk mid-infrared spectra using 597 calibration samples. For the indicator showing the highest link (R2 =0.88) with SF6 CH4 data, the average daily heritability was 0.21, 0.20 and 0.10 for each lactation, respectively. The sire genetic variability was on average 2.82 kg2 of CH4 per lactation. The genetic difference between the sires having cows eructing higher and lower CH4 was 10 kg of CH4 averaged per lactation. In conclusion, CH4 indicators can be predicted by MIR and the genetic variability of these traits seems to exist. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 168 (59 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDo root-emitted volatile organic compounds attract wireworms?
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Latine, Rémi ULg; Gfeller, Aurélie ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012), 77(3), 561-567

Wireworms are the soil dwelling larvae of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Their importance as crop pests increases since the efficient chemical means to control them cannot be considered anymore ... [more ▼]

Wireworms are the soil dwelling larvae of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Their importance as crop pests increases since the efficient chemical means to control them cannot be considered anymore. Therefore, many integrated pest management strategies have been investigated in the past few years. Most of them rely on the understanding of the ecology of the click beetles during their whole life cycle. We focus our work on the chemical ecology of wireworms, more precisely on the root-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that might intervene in the food-searching process of the larvae by helping them to find a suitable host-plant or by acting as key factors in the belowground defence mechanism of the plant. Here, we present our first results of dual-choice orientation tests in olfactometric pipes. Wireworms (Agriotes sordidus Illiger) were submitted individually to a variety of olfactory baits ranging from entire barley roots (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Quench) to isolated VOCs identified as part of the emitting profile. The latter was described thanks to HS-SPME samplings and GC-MS analysis, for roots grown in the exact same conditions as for the olfactometric experimentations with entire roots. Most of the experimentations gave significant results. When confronted to volatiles emitted by entire roots, wireworms significantly orientated towards the bait (χ²-goodness-of-fit test, χ²=8, P-value=0.005). This result allowed us to follow up with the same device and to progressively vary the nature of the baits. Our protocol should be used for other plant-wireworm species combinations. Our results should be taken into account in varietal selection, in crop rotation, or in trapping systems aiming at the reduction of the populations of wireworms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (43 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNew insights on the role of root radial hydraulic conductivity in the overall water uptake process
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Draye, X.

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012), 77(1), 117--122

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)