References of "Clinical Transplantation"
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See detailDoes comfort therapy during controlled donation after circulatory death shorten the life of potential donors?
LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg et al

in Clinical transplantation (2014), 28(1), 47-51

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) remains ethically controversial. The authors developed a controlled DCD protocol in which comfort therapy is regularly used. The aim of this study was to determine whether this policy shortens the DCD donors' life. METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data on patients proposed for DCD at the University Hospital of Liege, Belgium, over a 56-month period. The survival duration of these patients, defined as duration between the time of proposal for DCD and the time of circulatory arrest, was compared between patients who actually donated organs and those who did not. RESULTS: About 128 patients were considered for controlled DCD and 54 (43%) became donors. Among the 74 non-donor patients, 34 (46%) objected to organ donation, 38 patients (51%) were denied by the transplant team for various medical reasons, and two potential DCD donors did not undergo procurement due to logistical and organizational reasons. The survival durations were similar in the DCD donor and non-donor groups. No non-donor patient survived. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of DCD donors is not shortened when compared with non-donor patients. These data support the ethical and respectful approach to potential DCD donors in the authors' center, including regular comfort therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of laboratory-induced Meld score differences on liver allocation: more reality than myth.
Schouten, J. N.; Francque, S.; Van Vlierberghe, H. et al

in Clinical Transplantation (2012), 26(1), 62-70

Background: Liver allocation in Eurotransplant (ET) is based on the MELD score. Interlaboratory MELD score differences in INR and creatinine determination have been reported. The clinical implication of ... [more ▼]

Background: Liver allocation in Eurotransplant (ET) is based on the MELD score. Interlaboratory MELD score differences in INR and creatinine determination have been reported. The clinical implication of this observation has not been demonstrated. Methods: MELD scores were calculated in 66 patients with liver cirrhosis using bilirubin, creatinine, and INR analyzed in six liver transplant centers. Based on allocation results of ET, patients transplanted from December 2006 to June 2007 were divided according to MELD score in four groups. For each group, the influence of the match MELD on the probability of receiving a transplant was studied (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: Laboratory-dependent significant differences in MELD score were demonstrated. Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant association between MELD score and the probability of organ allocation. The unadjusted hazard ratio for receiving a liver transplant was significantly different between group 2 and group 4 (group 2: MELD 19–24; group 4: MELD > 30). Conclusion: Laboratory-dependent significant differences in MELD score were observed between the six transplant centers. We demonstrated a significant association between the MELD score and the probability of organ allocation. The observed interlaboratory variation might yield a significant difference in organ allocation in patients with high MELD scores. [less ▲]

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See detailTacrolimus combined with two different corticosteroid-free regimens compared with a standard triple regimen in renal transplantation: one year observational results.
Kramer, B. K.; Klinger, M.; Wlodarczyk, Z. et al

in Clinical Transplantation (2009)

Side effects of steroid use have led to efforts to minimize their use in transplantation. Two corticosteroid-free regimens were compared with a triple immunosuppressive therapy. Data from the original ... [more ▼]

Side effects of steroid use have led to efforts to minimize their use in transplantation. Two corticosteroid-free regimens were compared with a triple immunosuppressive therapy. Data from the original intent-to-treat (ITT) population (153 tacrolimus/basiliximab [Tac/Bas], 151 tacrolimus/MMF [Tac/MMF], and 147 tacrolimus/MMF/steroids [control]) were analyzed in a 12-month follow-up. Percentage of graft survival were 92.8%, 95.4%, and 95.9% (KM estimates 89.9%, 95.3%, 95.9%), percentage of surviving patients were 98.7%, 98.0%, and 100% (KM estimates 95.9%, 92.8%, and 100%). During months 7-12, graft loss occurred in 3 Tac/Bas, 2 Tac/MMF, and zero control patients, patient deaths in 1 Tac/Bas, 2 Tac/MMF, and zero control, and biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes in 4 Tac/Bas, 3 Tac/MMF, and zero control. Mean serum creatinine at month 12 was 141.9 +/- 69.6 muM, 144.0 +/- 82.1 muM, and 134.5 +/- 71.2 muM (ns). New-onset insulin use in previously non-diabetic patients at month 12 was 1/138, 6/127, and 4/126. Patient and graft survival as well as renal function at 12 months were not different between patient groups, despite considerably higher rates of acute rejection occurring within the first six months after transplantation in both steroid-free patient groups. Tac/Bas therapy might offer benefits in terms of a trend for a more favorable cardiovascular risk profile. [less ▲]

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See detailCreatinine-based formulae for the estimation of glomerular filtration rate in heart transplant recipients
Delanaye, Pierre ULg; Nellessen, Eric ULg; Grosch, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Clinical Transplantation (2006), 20(5, Sep-Oct), 596-603

Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a common complication in heart transplant patients. Serum creatinine has clear limitations for the detection and estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Various ... [more ▼]

Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a common complication in heart transplant patients. Serum creatinine has clear limitations for the detection and estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Various creatinine-based formulae are classically used for GFR estimation, but little scientific evidence exists for such use in a heart transplant population. GFR was measured using the plasmatic clearance of the glomerular tracer Cr-51-EDTA in 27 heart transplant patients with two measures for 22 of the patients. Forty-nine measures were thus available for analysis. The precision and accuracy (Bland and Altman analysis) of the Cockcroft, simplified Modified Diet in Renal Diseases (MDRD) and new Mayo Clinic formulae were compared. The mean GFR of the population was 39 +/- 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2). All formulae were well correlated with the GFR. With the Bland and Altman analysis, the accuracy of the MDRD formula appeared higher than that of the Cockcroft or the Mayo Clinic formulae (bias of +12 mL/min/1.73 m(2), vs. +19.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and +22.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively). The difference between the estimated and measured GFR was higher than 20 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 51% and 55% cases when using the Cockcroft and the Mayo Clinic formulae respectively, whereas the difference was only noted in 14% cases when the MDRD was used. Among creatinine-based formulae, the MDRD appears the most precise and accurate for estimating the GFR in heart transplant patients. However, when the GFR must be measured with high accuracy, we recommend the use of a reference method like inulin or Cr-51-EDTA plasma clearance techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and cardiovascular safety of daclizumab, mycophenolate mofetil,tacrolimus, and early steroid withdrawal in renal transplant recipients: a multicenter,prospective, pilot trial
Abramowicz, Daniel; Vanrenterghem, Yves; Squifflet, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Clinical Transplantation (2005), 19

This single-arm, open-label, pilot study was designed to assess the efficacy and cardiovascular safety profile of daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal interleukin (IL)-2Ra antibody, in combination with ... [more ▼]

This single-arm, open-label, pilot study was designed to assess the efficacy and cardiovascular safety profile of daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal interleukin (IL)-2Ra antibody, in combination with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), tacrolimus, and early corticosteroid withdrawal in renal transplant recipients. Seventy-nine renal allograft recipients were treated with daclizumab (1 mg/kg; five doses starting on the day before transplant and then every two weeks), MMF (1 g b.i.d.), tacrolimus (0.2 mg/kg/d), and low-dose prednisolone, which was withdrawn at day 150 after transplant. The rate of acute rejection was determined at 12 months. Lipid profile, oral glucose tolerance, and adverse events were monitored. Of the 76 patients eligible for analysis, eight (10.5%) developed biopsyproven acute rejection (BPAR). Ten (13.2%) experienced clinical and/or BPAR. Corticosteroids were withdrawn completely in 91% of patients at 12 months. Graft and patient survival were 97.5% and 98.7% respectively. Mean total cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly lower at 12 months post-transplant than at baseline (201 ± 47.5 vs. 190.8 ± 43.6 mg/dL, p ¼ 0.005 and 196.2 ± 133.2 vs. 144.5 ± 76.8 mg/ dL, p < 0.001, respectively). Mean hemoglobin A1c levels did not differ between baseline (5.54%) and 12 months (5.48%). New-onset posttransplant diabetes mellitus occurred in 6.6% of the non-diabetic transplanted patients. The proportion of patients with abnormal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was 47% at 3 months and 39% at 12 months (p ¼ NS). Daclizumab induction in combination with MMF, tacrolimus, and low-dose (followed by withdrawal) prednisolone appears to be effective and safe in patients receiving renal allografts. The regimen appears to be associated with a favorable cardiovascular profile. [less ▲]

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See detailErythropoiesis and renal transplant pregnancy.
Magee, L. A.; von Dadelszen, P.; Darley, J. et al

in Clinical Transplantation (2000), 14(2), 127-35

OBJECTIVE: To examine erythropoiesis in renal transplant pregnancies. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of 30 renal transplant cases and 30 age, smoking and parity-matched healthy controls with normal ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To examine erythropoiesis in renal transplant pregnancies. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of 30 renal transplant cases and 30 age, smoking and parity-matched healthy controls with normal index pregnancy. Retrospective chart review and assay of frozen antenatal serum (for serum erythropoietin concentration [serum EPO]), transferrin receptor protein [TfR], ferritin, folate and B12) were performed. The linear regression equation for normal pregnancy controls was used to calculate predicted [serum EPO] and the observed/predicted (O/P) log [serum EPO] was plotted. The relationship between [serum EPO] and haemoglobin (Hb) among transplant cases was considered to be different from that among controls if the slope of the O/P log [serum EPO] versus Hb regression was significantly different from zero. RESULTS: The transplant (14 cadaveric) to conception interval was (median [range]) 33.5 [4, 189] months. Immunosuppressants were azathioprine (n = 25), cyclosporine (n = 22) and/or prednisone (n = 25). Cases were more often primiparous (20 vs. 7 [controls]; p = 0.01), had pre-existent hypertension (20 vs. 0 [controls]; p < 0.001), developed new/increased hypertension or pre-eclampsia (28 vs. 0 [controls]; p < 0.001) and an antenatal rise in creatinine (14 vs. 2 [controls]; p < 0.001). In early pregnancy, cases had similar EPO (15.2 [2.6, 84.6] vs. 15.7 [6.4, 41.0] [controls] U/L) but lower Hb (101 [65, 129] vs. 116 [106, 150] g/L; p < 0.001). Twenty-two (73%) cases had Hb < 100 g/L (vs. 4 [controls]; p < 0.0001); Hb was comparable at 6 wk postpartum. With advancing gestational age (GA), Hb remained stable and serum EPO increased in both groups. The slope of the O/P log [serum EPO] versus Hb for transplant cases was significantly different from zero within both the 17-28 wk (slope +/- SEM: 0.010 +/- 0.002; p < 0.0001) and the 29-42 wk GA categories (0.006 +/- 0.003; p = 0.02). Cases showed smaller rises in serum TfR (change 481 [- 1471, 2780]) vs. 1119 [- 698, 4195] [controls] ng/mL; p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Anaemia frequently complicates renal transplant pregnancies, in which serum EPO is inappropriately low and the rate of erythropoiesis blunted. [less ▲]

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See detailManagement of Recipients of Hepatic Allografts Harvested from Donors with Malignancy Diagnosed Shortly after Transplantation
Detry, Olivier ULg; Honore, Pierre ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas et al

in Clinical Transplantation (1998), 12(6), 579-81

Transmission of undiagnosed malignancy with the graft is a dramatic complication of liver transplantation. Alternatives in the management of the recipients of livers, harvested from donors with malignancy ... [more ▼]

Transmission of undiagnosed malignancy with the graft is a dramatic complication of liver transplantation. Alternatives in the management of the recipients of livers, harvested from donors with malignancy diagnosed shortly after transplantation, are either early re-transplantation or close follow-up without re-operation. We reported 4 cases of liver recipients whose allografts were harvested from donors who were diagnosed with malignancy shortly after the liver transplantation. One recipient underwent re-transplantation, and the three other allografts were not removed. No recipient developed recurrence in the follow-up. While graft removal may be the only way to avoid tumor recurrence in recipients of liver graft harvested from donor with malignancy, close follow-up without re-operation may also be considered. The risk of tumor transferral may depend on the histopathological aggressiveness and metastatic potential of the donor tumor, and may be low for low-grade, local tumors. This risk should be evaluated by analyzing large series, using databases of Eurotransplant or United Network for Organ Sharing. [less ▲]

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See detailLaparoscopic-Assisted Colectomy in Heart Transplant Recipients
Detry, Olivier ULg; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg; Chiche, Jean-Daniel et al

in Clinical Transplantation (1996), 10(2), 191-4

Reports of laparoscopy in heart graft recipients are scarce and, to our knowledge, laparoscopic colectomy has not yet been reported in heart transplant patients. The magnitude and the tolerance of the ... [more ▼]

Reports of laparoscopy in heart graft recipients are scarce and, to our knowledge, laparoscopic colectomy has not yet been reported in heart transplant patients. The magnitude and the tolerance of the hemodynamic changes induced by pneumoperitoneum are unknown in heart graft recipients, who have a denervated heart and are "preload-dependent". The authors report the clinical courses of 2 heart graft recipients who developed acute diverticulitis without perforation or peritonitis and who underwent laparoscopic-assisted colectomy without complications. [less ▲]

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