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See detailMonthly oral ibandronate is effective and well tolerated after 3 years: the MOBILE long-term extension.
Stakkestad, Jacob A; Lakatos, Peter; Lorenc, Roman et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2008), 27(8), 955-60

Oral ibandronate is the first bisphosphonate licensed for once-monthly treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The 2-year Monthly Oral iBandronate In LadiEs (MOBILE) registration study assessed bone ... [more ▼]

Oral ibandronate is the first bisphosphonate licensed for once-monthly treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The 2-year Monthly Oral iBandronate In LadiEs (MOBILE) registration study assessed bone mineral density (BMD) and markers of bone turnover and showed that monthly oral ibandronate was at least as effective and well tolerated as a 2.5-mg daily oral regimen. In this study, we report the first year of a long-term extension study to MOBILE and a post hoc analysis of patients receiving 3 years of continuous treatment with monthly ibandronate. Patients who completed MOBILE were eligible for the partially randomized, double-blind extension study and received 100 mg (n = 359) or 150 mg (n = 360) monthly oral ibandronate. A post hoc analysis included patients who received either 100 mg (n = 173) or 150 mg (n = 169) monthly ibandronate continuously throughout the original 2-year MOBILE study and during the first year of the extension study. After one additional year of treatment (total of 3 years), mean lumbar spine BMD increased a further 1.5 and 1.1% in the 150 and 100 mg arms, respectively, compared with 2-year data (original MOBILE study). Total hip BMD changed by 0.3 and -0.08%, respectively. In the post hoc analysis, 3-year increases in lumbar spine BMD were significant in patients receiving ibandronate 150 mg monthly (7.6%; p < 0.0001 vs. baseline) and 100 mg monthly (6.4%; p < 0.0001 vs. baseline). Both groups achieved significant increases in total hip BMD after 3 years compared with baseline (3.4%, 100 mg; 4.1%, 150 mg; p < 0.0001). Serum C-telopeptide of the alpha chain of type I collagen decreased significantly over 3 years' treatment (p < 0.001; all comparisons vs. baseline), remaining within the premenopausal range. Once-monthly oral ibandronate was well tolerated with a low incidence of clinical osteoporotic fractures and upper gastrointestinal events. In conclusion, 150-mg monthly oral ibandronate is an effective and well-tolerated long-term treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis, with consistent improvement in BMD and bone turnover during 3 years' continuous treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailHealthcare consumption and direct costs of rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium
Westhovens, R.; Boonen, A.; Verbruggen, L. et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2005), 24(6), 615-619

The aim of this study was to compare the socioeconomic consequences of early and late rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium and to assess the patient out-of-pocket contributions. This multicentre longitudinal ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to compare the socioeconomic consequences of early and late rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium and to assess the patient out-of-pocket contributions. This multicentre longitudinal study in Belgium evaluated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Early disease was defined as diagnosis since less than 1 year. At baseline sociodemographic and disease characteristics were assessed and during the following year patients recorded all healthcare- and non-healthcare-related direct costs and out-of-pocket contributions. The study included 48 patients with early and 85 patients with late rheumatoid arthritis. Mean disease duration was 0.5 vs 12.5 years in patients with early and late rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The disease activity score (DAS28) was comparable between both groups (4.1 vs 4.5, p=0.14), but physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) was more impaired in patients with long-standing disease (1.0 vs 1.7, p < 0.001). Work disability had increased from 2% in patients with early to 18% in patients with late disease. The annual societal direct costs per patient were E 3055 (median: E 1518) opposed to E 9946 (median: E 4017) for early and late rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The higher direct cost for patients with long-standing disease was seen for all categories, but especially for physiotherapy and need for devices and adaptations. Patients with early as well as late disease contribute out of pocket about one-third to the direct healthcare costs. Within each group, HAQ was a strong determinant of costs. In Belgium, patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis are nine times more likely to be work disabled than patients with less than 1 year disease duration and have a threefold increase in costs. Differences in healthcare consumption between patients could be mainly explained by differences in physical function (HAQ). [less ▲]

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See detailRadiologic features poorly predict clinical outcomes in knee osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 412

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See detailRadiographic severity of knee osteoarthrits is highly correlated with future progression of the disease
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 412

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See detailImportance of social companionship in the determination of health-related quality of life in hip and knee osteoarthrits
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Van Parijs, P.; Delhalle, S. et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 413

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See detailImpact of joint space width measurement method on sample size calculation in knee osteoarthritis studies
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 413

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See detailLong-term Effects of Avocado/Soybean Unsaponifiable on Human Chondrocytes Metabolism
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Sanchez, Christelle ULg; Deberg, Michelle ULg et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 20(5), 45

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See detailInterest of a prescreening questionnaire to reduce the cost of bone densitometry
Ben Sedrine, Wafa ULg; Broers, P; Devogelaer, JP et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 20

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See detailRespective value of four biochemical markers of bone resorption for the diagnosis of postmenopausal osteoporosis and the monitoring of anti-resorptive therapies
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Taquet, A. N.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 421

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See detailTibial subchondral sclerosis and femoral osteophytes are linked to symptomatic and structural severity of knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 411

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See detailTibial subchondral sclerosis is significantly correlated with long-term (3-year) radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honoré, Aline et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 412

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See detailMeasurement of the tibial subchondral bone mineral density: a potential tool for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthrits
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Dardenne, Charles-Bernard et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2001), 5(Suppl.1), 411

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