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See detailPrevalence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing
Magoue Lonchel, Carine ULg; MELIN, Pierrette ULg; Gangoué-Piéboji, J et al

in Clinical Microbiology & Infection (2013), 19(9), 416-20

During April 2010 and June 2010, 334 Enterobacteriaceae isolates from 590 participants (outpatients, inpatients, inpatient carers, hospital workers and members of their households) were collected from ... [more ▼]

During April 2010 and June 2010, 334 Enterobacteriaceae isolates from 590 participants (outpatients, inpatients, inpatient carers, hospital workers and members of their households) were collected from faecal samples. Based on b-lactamase pattern, origin of strains and the relationship between participants, 44 isolates of extended-spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were selected from 44 participants (in Ngaoundere Protestant Hospital and Ngaoundere Regional Hospital, Cameroon). To determine the relatedness of bacterial strains, these isolates were fingerprinted using the automated, repetitive-sequenced-based PCR-based DiversiLab system. Subsequently, E. coli isolates that had undergone DiversiLab analysis were examined with respect to their phylogenetic group and detection of the ST131 clone to shed light on the epidemiology of these isolates in the Ngaoundere hospitals. The prevalence of faecal carriage of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae among the study participants was 54.06%. According to participant groups, the prevalence of faecal carriage was also high (outpatients 45%; inpatients 67%; inpatient carers 57%; hospital workers 44%; and members of their households 46%). Analysis of the molecular epidemiology of ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae showed a close relationship of the isolates between related and nonrelated individuals. In addition, DiversiLab results of E. coli identified four related isolates (4/22) from cluster III belonging to the epidemiologically important clone ST131. Our results highlight the importance of outpatients, inpatients, their carers, hospital workers and their families as reservoirs of ESBLproducing Enterobacteriaceae. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of three immunoassays for serodiagnosis of human Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection
HUYNEN, Pascale ULg; TOUSSAINT, Françoise ULg; HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

in Clinical Microbiology & Infection (2012, April), 18(S3), 231

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See detailNeonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease: From Pathogenesis to Preventive strategies
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

in Clinical Microbiology & Infection (2011)

Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B streptococcus (GBS), remains the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, early onset and late onset diseases (EOD, LOD). Where consensus guidelines to detect ... [more ▼]

Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B streptococcus (GBS), remains the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, early onset and late onset diseases (EOD, LOD). Where consensus guidelines to detect and treat intrapartum women with GBS colonization have been widely adopted, incidence of neonatal EOD has dramatically declined. In response to both successful impacts on the incidence of GBS-EOD and analyses of missed opportunities, the first American guidelines for prevention issued in the 90s have since been adapted in several stages to improve their efficacy. In some countries in Europe, nationwide guidelines, whether screening-based or risk-based, for the prevention of neonatal GBS diseases have also been issued and adopted, with the expected impact on incidence of GBS-EOD. In spite of universal screening, in spite of the great progress that has been made, GBS-EOD continues to occur and the GBS burden remains a significant public health issue. Continuous efforts to improve screening for GBS status continue to be important and may be able to take advantage of new rapid diagnostic technologies. The current screening-based strategy for prevention is highly effective but imperfect. Given the challenges, limitations and potential complications of maternal intrapartum prophylaxis, a new approach is still needed. Maternal immunization against GBS is an attractive alternative for the prevention of not only neonatal diseases but also stillbirths and maternal diseases. Vaccines against GBS may likely become the most effective and sustainable long-term preventive strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailA MLPA-oligochromatographic multiplex assay for identification of the toxin genotype and the hypervirulent ribotype O27 of Clostridium difficile
Durenne, Bastien ULg; Laurent, Thierry; Leclipteux, Thierry et al

in Clinical Microbiology & Infection (2009, May), 15(s4),

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See detailLIAISON® VZV IgG and VZV IgM assays: a comparative study
HUYNEN, Pascale ULg; MELIN, Pierrette ULg; HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

in Clinical Microbiology & Infection (2007, April), 13(Suppl. S1), 639

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