References of "Clinical & Experimental Metastasis"
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See detailRegulation of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase expression by zonula occludens-2 in human lung cancer cells.
Luczka, E.; Syne, Laïdya ULg; Nawrocki-Raby, B. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (2013)

During tumor invasion, tumor epithelial cells acquire migratory and invasive properties involving important phenotypic alterations. Among these changes, one can observe reorganization or a loss of cell ... [more ▼]

During tumor invasion, tumor epithelial cells acquire migratory and invasive properties involving important phenotypic alterations. Among these changes, one can observe reorganization or a loss of cell-cell adhesion complexes such as tight junctions (TJs). TJs are composed of transmembrane proteins (occludin, claudins) linked to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic adaptor molecules including those of the zonula occludens family (ZO-1, -2, -3). We here evaluated the potential role of ZO-2 in the acquisition of invasive properties by tumor cells. In vivo, we showed a decrease of ZO-2 expression in bronchopulmonary cancers, with a preferential localization in the cytoplasm. In addition, in vitro, the localization of ZO-2 varied according to invasive properties of tumor cells, with a cytoplasmic localization correlating with invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that ZO-2 inhibition increases invasive and migrative capacities of invasive tumor cells. This was associated with an increase of MT1-MMP. These results suggest that ZO-2, besides its structural role in tight junction assembly, can act also as a repressor of tumor progression through its ability to reduce the expression of tumor-promoting genes in invasive tumor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailHistone Deacetylases: Target Enzymes for Cancer Therapy
Mottet, Denis ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (2007)

Epigenic regulation of gene transcription has recently been the subject of a fast growing interest particularly in the field of cancer. Enzymatic acetylation and deacetylation of the epsilon-amino groups ... [more ▼]

Epigenic regulation of gene transcription has recently been the subject of a fast growing interest particularly in the field of cancer. Enzymatic acetylation and deacetylation of the epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues from nucleosomal histones, represents major molecular epigenic mechanisms controlling gene expression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyl transferases (HAT) represent the two families of enzymes in charge of the control of the level of acetylation of the histone tails. By removing the acetyl groups that abrogate the positive charge of the lysine residues that maintain the histone tails attached to DNA, HDACs repress transcription. In mammals, these latter enzymes form three groups of related enzymes based on their sequence homology and are classified as HDACs I, II and III. Global inhibition of the HDACs I and II groups results in cell growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells and alters tumor growth in in vivo experimental models. Their surprisingly low general toxicity and their impressive efficiency in preclinical cancer models has led to consider HDAC inhibitors as very promising new anticancer pharmacological agents. In this review, we attempt to give a comprehensive overview of the role and the involvement of HDAC in carcinogenesis as well as the current progress on the development of HDAC general and specific inhibitors as new cancer therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailBreast cancer progression: insights into multifaceted matrix metalloproteinases
Chabottaux, Vincent; Noël, Agnès ULg

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (2007), 24(8), 647-656

The restricted view of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as simple destroyers of extracellular matrix components has largely ignored their substantial contribution in many aspects of cancer development and ... [more ▼]

The restricted view of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as simple destroyers of extracellular matrix components has largely ignored their substantial contribution in many aspects of cancer development and metastatic dissemination. Over the last few years, the relevance of MMPs in the processing of a large array of extracellular and cell surface-associated proteins has grown considerably. Our knowledge about the complex functions of MMPs and how their contribution may differ throughout cancer progression is rapidly expanding. These new findings provide several explanations for the lack of success of MMP inhibition in clinical trials. A complete understanding of MMP biology is needed before considering them, their substrates or their products as therapeutic targets. In this review, we explore the different faces of MMP implication in breast cancer progression by considering both clinical and fundamental aspects. [less ▲]

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See detailEndothelial Cell Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration Is Increased Upon Breast Tumor Cell Contact and Mediates Tumor Cell Transendothelial Migration
Lewalle, J. M.; Cataldo, Didier ULg; Bajou, Khalid ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1998), 16(1), 21-9

Tumor cell extravasation is a determinant step in the process of hematogenous metastasis. The signal transduction pathways involved in the interactions between tumor cells and the vascular endothelium ... [more ▼]

Tumor cell extravasation is a determinant step in the process of hematogenous metastasis. The signal transduction pathways involved in the interactions between tumor cells and the vascular endothelium during transendothelial migration are still undefined. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7) on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). We show that the contact between MCF7 cells and a confluent HUVEC monolayer induces an immediate and transient increase in HUVEC [Ca2+]i. This [Ca2+]i rise could not be elicited by tumor cell-conditioned medium, isolated tumor cell membranes, inert beads or normal breast epithelial cells, demonstrating the involvement of specific recognition mechanisms between MCF7 cells and HUVEC. Depletion of HUVEC intracellular Ca2+ stores by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin as well as the selective depletion of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca2+ stores by prior activation of HUVEC using histamine resulted in a complete inhibition of tumor cell-induced [Ca2+]i elevation. Similar results were obtained when HUVEC monolayers were treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A, suggesting a role for tyrosine kinase-associated cell surface receptors in tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions. The depletion of HUVEC intracellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin was also shown to delay MCF7-induced endothelial cell disjunction, to prevent their spreading on the subendothelial extracellular matrix and transendothelial migration in vitro. These results suggest that transient changes in endothelial [Ca2+]i may govern multiple steps of tumor cell extravasation. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociation of fibroblastoid features with the invasive phenotype in human bronchial cancer cell lines
Polette, M.; Gilles, Christine ULg; de Bentzmann, S. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1998), 16(2), 105-12

The acquisition of a metastatic phenotype by epithelial cells implicates a series of changes altering their differentiation, their overall behavior and morphology. In the present study, we have examined ... [more ▼]

The acquisition of a metastatic phenotype by epithelial cells implicates a series of changes altering their differentiation, their overall behavior and morphology. In the present study, we have examined the relationships between the cellular morphology, E-cadherin expression, matrix metalloproteinases expression and in vitro invasive properties in two human bronchial immortalized cell lines. The (16HBE14o-) cell line which did not show any invasive abilities in the Boyden chamber assay displayed a typical epithelial morphology in monolayer, expressed high levels of E-cadherin and synthesized neither MMP-2 and MT1-MMP nor vimentin. In contrast, the BZR cell line which was highly invasive displayed a more elongated phenotype in monolayer, did not produce E-cadherin but expressed vimentin, MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. Our data therefore suggest that the metastatic progression of broncho-pulmonary cancer cells results in a cellular dedifferentiation and the gain of some mesenchymal attributes (loss of E-cadherin and expression of vimentin) associated with enhanced degradative properties (expression of metalloproteinases) [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of c-ets-1 mRNA is associated with an invasive, EMT-derived phenotype in breast carcinoma cell lines.
Gilles, Christine ULg; Polette, M.; Birembaut, P. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1997), 15(5), 519-26

We have previously observed in vitro that some stromal proteinases (MMP-2, MT1-MMP) were expressed or activated by invasive carcinoma cell lines exhibiting mesenchymal features, presumably acquired ... [more ▼]

We have previously observed in vitro that some stromal proteinases (MMP-2, MT1-MMP) were expressed or activated by invasive carcinoma cell lines exhibiting mesenchymal features, presumably acquired through an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). To examine the potential contribution of c-ets-1 to this phenotype, we have compared here the expression of c-ets-1 with invasiveness in vitro and expression of vimentin, E-cadherin, uPA, MMP-1 and MMP-3 in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. Our results clearly demonstrate an association between c-ets-1 expression and the invasive, EMT-derived phenotype, which is typified by the expression of vimentin and the lack of E-cadherin. While absent from the two non-invasive, vimentin-negative cell lines, c-ets-1 was abundantly expressed in all the four vimentin-positive lines. However, we could not find a clear quantitative or qualitative relationship between the expression of c-ets-1 and the three proteinases known to be regulated by c-ets-1, except that when they were expressed, it was only in the invasive c-ets-1-positive lines. UPA mRNAs were found in three of the four vimentin-positive lines, MMP-1 in two of the four, and MMP-3 could not be detected in any of the cell lines. Intriguingly, MDA-MB-435 cells, which exhibit the highest metastatic potential of these cell lines in nude mice, expressed vimentin and c-ets-1, but lacked expression of these three proteinases, at least under the culture conditions employed. Taken together, our results show that c-ets-1 expression is associated with an invasive, EMT-derived phenotype in breast cancer cells, although it is apparently not sufficient to ensure the expression of uPA, MMP-1 or MMP-3, in the vimentin-positive cells. Such proteases regulation is undoubtedly qualified by the cellular context. This study therefore advances our understanding of the molecular regulation of invasiveness in EMT-associated carcinoma progression, and suggests that c-ets-1 may contribute to the invasive phenotype in carcinoma cells. [less ▲]

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See detailInduction of membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) expression in human fibroblasts by breast adenocarcinoma cells.
Polette, M.; Gilles, Christine ULg; Marchand, V. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1997), 15(2), 157-63

Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) has been recently described as an activator of proMMP-2 (MMP-2) which is involved in tumor invasion. We have shown by in situ hybridization that MT1-MMP ... [more ▼]

Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) has been recently described as an activator of proMMP-2 (MMP-2) which is involved in tumor invasion. We have shown by in situ hybridization that MT1-MMP is produced by stromal cells in close contact to preinvasive and invasive tumor cells of breast carcinomas. Of particular interest was the observation that some fibroblasts express this enzyme in focal areas in preinvasive lesions, suggesting that particular tumor cells may stimulate fibroblasts to produce MT1-MMP. We have therefore compared the ability of two different breast cancer cell lines, one non-invasive (MCF7) and one invasive (MDA-MB-231) to stimulate MT1-MMP production in human fibroblasts with consequent proMMP-2-activation. The MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium induced MT1-MMP mRNAs in human fibroblasts and a parallel activation of proMMP-2 whereas MCF7 conditioned medium did not have any effect. These results suggest the existence of soluble factor(s) secreted by invasive or some preinvasive breast tumor cells which stimulate fibroblasts to produce and activate MMPs, and emphasize the cooperation between cancer and stromal cells in tumor invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailOverexpression of the 67-kDa laminin receptor correlates with tumor progression in human prostate cancer
Waltregny, David ULg; de Leval, Laurence ULg; Ménard, Sylvie et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1996, March), 14(Suppl. 1), 1996

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See detailArrest of MCF-7 cell migration by laminin in vitro: possible mechanisms.
Coopman, P.; Verhasselt, B.; Bracke, M. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(5), 469-84

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by ... [more ▼]

Laminin, a major basement membrane component, arrested the migration of MCF-7/AZ human breast adenocarcinoma cells that were not invasive in vitro. Migration of invasive MCF-7/6 cells was not affected by laminin. Both cell types expressed the 67 kD laminin receptor, at both mRNA and protein level, but did not express the alpha 6 subunit of the VLA-6 integrin-type laminin receptor. The presence of YIGSR peptides (100 micrograms/ml), reported to block the interaction between laminin and its 67 kD receptor, did not change the migratory response of MCF-7/AZ or MCF-7/6 cells when meeting laminin lanes. In addition, the migration of these cell types was not affected by the presence of 17-beta-estradiol (10(-6) M) or all-trans retinoic acid (10(-6) M), which were both reported to increase the number of 67 kD receptors. We could therefore not assign an involvement of the 67 kD receptors in migration of MCF-7 cells on laminin, nor did we find evidence that conditioned medium of MCF-7/6 cells contains factors that are able to initiate migration of MCF-7/AZ cells on laminin. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of catechins and citrus flavonoids on invasion in vitro.
Bracke, M.; Vyncke, B.; Opdenakker, G. et al

in Clinical & Experimental Metastasis (1991), 9(1), 13-25

Catechins, a group of flavonoid molecules, inhibit invasion of mouse MO4 cells into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The anti-invasive effects can be ranked as follows: (+)-catechin greater than ... [more ▼]

Catechins, a group of flavonoid molecules, inhibit invasion of mouse MO4 cells into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The anti-invasive effects can be ranked as follows: (+)-catechin greater than (-)-epicatechin greater than 3-O-methyl-(+)-catechin greater than 3-O-palmitoyl-(+)-catechin. Most of the catechins are unstable in cell culture media, and their spontaneous rearrangement products tend to bind to extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to these interactions proteases such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) are linked to the ECM glycoprotein laminin. This leads to a partial inactivation of the enzyme. Within the group of catechins we found a positive correlation between anti-invasive activity and linking of t-PA to laminin. Citrus flavonoids are also anti-invasive in vitro (tangeretin greater than nobiletin greater than hesperidin = naringin). However, these stable molecules show poor affinity for ECM, and do not link enzymes to laminin. These data suggest that catechins and citrus flavonoids inhibit invasion in vitro by different mechanisms. [less ▲]

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