References of "CELL DEATH & DIFFERENTIATION"
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See detailGlycine receptors control the generation of projection neurons in the developing cerebral cortex
Avila, Ariel; Vidal, P.M.; Tielens, Sylvia ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (in press)

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See detailPERK IS REQUIRED AT THE ER-TO-MITOCHONDRIA CONTACT SITES TO CONVEY APOPTOSIS FOLLOWING ROS-MEDIATED ER STRESS
VERFAILLIE, T; RUBIO, N; GARG, A et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (2012), 19

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See detailMicroRNAs tune cerebral cortical neurogenesis.
Volvert, M.-L.; Rogister, F.; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (2012), 19(10), 1573-81

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that promote post-transcriptional silencing of genes involved in a wide range of developmental and pathological processes. It is estimated that most protein-coding genes harbor miRNA recognition sequences in their 3' untranslated region and are thus putative targets. While functions of miRNAs have been extensively characterized in various tissues, their multiple contributions to cerebral cortical development are just beginning to be unveiled. This review aims to outline the evidence collected to date demonstrating a role for miRNAs in cerebral corticogenesis with a particular emphasis on pathways that control the birth and maturation of functional excitatory projection neurons. [less ▲]

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See detailHDAC5 is required for maintenance of pericentric heterochromatin, and controls cell-cycle progression and survival of human cancer cells
Peixoto, Paul ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Matheus, Nicolas ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (2012)

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) form a family of enzymes, which have fundamental roles in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and contribute to the growth, differentiation, and apoptosis of cancer ... [more ▼]

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) form a family of enzymes, which have fundamental roles in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and contribute to the growth, differentiation, and apoptosis of cancer cells. In this study, we further investigated the biological function of HDAC5 in cancer cells. We found HDAC5 is associated with actively replicating pericentric heterochromatin during late S phase. We demonstrated that specific depletion of HDAC5 by RNA interference resulted in profound changes in the heterochromatin structure and slowed down ongoing replication forks. This defect in heterochromatin maintenance and assembly are sensed by DNA damage checkpoint pathways, which triggered cancer cells to autophagy and apoptosis, and arrested their growth both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we also demonstrated that HDAC5 depletion led to enhanced sensitivity of DNA to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting that heterochromatin de-condensation induced by histone HDAC5 silencing may enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic agents that act by targeting DNA in vitro. Together, these results highlighted for the first time an unrecognized link between HDAC5 and the maintenance/assembly of heterochromatin structure, and demonstrated that its specific inhibition might contribute to increase the efficacy of DNA alteration-based cancer therapies in clinic. [less ▲]

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See detailA new role for NF-kappaB in angiogenesis inhibition.
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Griffioen, A. W.

in Cell Death & Differentiation (2007), 14(8), 1393-7

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See detailNuclear Localization of a New C-Cbl Related Protein, Carp 90, During in Vivo Thymic Apoptosis in Mice
Denis, Ghislaine; Mandard, S.; Verlaet, Myriam ULg et al

in Cell Death & Differentiation (1999), 6(7), 689-97

This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl protooncogene in thymocyte apoptosis occurring in vivo after hydrocortisone treatment. In the thymus of untreated mice, a few medullary and cortical ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl protooncogene in thymocyte apoptosis occurring in vivo after hydrocortisone treatment. In the thymus of untreated mice, a few medullary and cortical thymocytes expressed p120cbl, mainly in the cytoplasm. In the cortex, their number and distribution resemble that of apoptotic cells evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of Cbl is rapidly increased when apoptosis is triggered by hydrocortisone. This Cbl-specific immunostaining was detected in the nucleus and is due to a Cbl-related 90 kDa protein (CARP 90). These results show that a c-cbl product could localize in the nucleus and suggest that it could be involved as a regulator of thymic apoptosis. [less ▲]

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