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See detailImplication des papillomavirus humains dans les cancers des voies aérodigestives supérieures
Neufcoeur, P. E.; Arafa, Mohammad Mahmoud Mohammad ULg; Delvenne, Philippe ULg et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2009), 96(9), 1-10

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See detailContribution de l’inactivation épigénétique des gènes BRCA1 et BRCA2 dans les cancers du sein sporadiques en Tunisie
Trimeche, Mounir; Ziadi, Sonia; Hachana, Mohamed Ridha ULg et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2008)

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See detailUnraveling the biology of MM disease: cancer stem cells, acquired intracellular changes and interactions with the surrounding micro-environment.
Caers, Jo ULg; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Menu, Eline et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2008), 95(3), 301-13

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See detailFréquence de l’hyperméthylation du promoteur du gène BLU dans le cancer du sein en Tunisie
Trimeche, Mounir; Ziadi, Sonia; Hachana, Mohamed Ridha ULg et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2007)

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See detailLa saga des inhibiteurs des histone-desacetylases: de la TSA au SAHA
Peixoto, Paul ULg; Lansiaux, Amelie

in Bulletin du Cancer (2006), 93(1), 27-36

Histone-deacetylase inhibitors (HDCACi) represent a new class of antitumor agents currently in clinical development. They target a family of enzymes which catalyse histone acetylation modifications, in ... [more ▼]

Histone-deacetylase inhibitors (HDCACi) represent a new class of antitumor agents currently in clinical development. They target a family of enzymes which catalyse histone acetylation modifications, in particular for histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. These proteins stabilize the nucleosome core, fundamental unity of chromatin which represents the first level of DNA nuclear compaction. The balance of histone acetylation is maintained by histone-acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone-deacetylases (HDAC) which play an important role in gene transcription. Alterations of HDACs were identified in tumor cells and contribute to the massive perturbations of gene expression in numerous tumors. HDAC inhibition leads to differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells. HDACi efficiently prevent tumor growth in a variety of in vivo preclinical models. Several structurally distinct classes of HDACi have entered in clinical trials and a significant antitumor activity was reported in several cases. However, a better understanding of the biological effects of this class of enzymes is mandatory for the successful development of these new antitumoral agents. In this review, are exposed the main drug candidates in clinical development. In the near future, it will be interesting to define direct relationships between specific inhibition of one or several HDAC and the subsequent HDAC-dependent antitumor effects to define a new generation of specific histone-deacetylase inhibitors. [less ▲]

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See detailIs 3 '-deoxy-3 '-[F-18] fluorothymidine ([F-18]-FLT) the next tracer for routine clinical PET after R [F-18]-FDG?
Couturier, Olivier; Léost, Françoise; Campone, Mario et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2005), 92(9), 789-798

Positron emission tomography (PET) with {F-18}-FDG is nowfirmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) with {F-18}-FDG is nowfirmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its uptake mechanism for tumors, or the low avidity of some cancer types such as prostate. Alternative tracers are thus being developed, in order to fill up this void. Proliferation as a biological target is particularly attractive in cancer imaging. From that perspective, fluorothymidine ({F-18}-FLT or FLT) has generated a strong interest among the scientific community, especially since the radiosynthesis process has been improved and simplified, thus making possible to envision a routine use for the tracer. This article aims at summarizing the status of the current scientific data regarding FLT The uptake mechanism of FLT is well known, relying on the thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) enzymatic activity, and thus on DNA synthesis, Preclinical studies have shown a clear relationship between tracer accumulation and level of tumor proliferation, even though DNA salvage pathwayss intervene in the process and may complicate the interpretation of the results. Several clinical studies suggest a good specificity for tumor, albeit with a lower sensitivity than with FDG. In all likelihood however, the future of FLT lies in the evaluation of antitumor response and possibly the pretherapeutic prognostic characterization, rather than in the diagnosis and staging of malignancies. Although the scientific data regarding this issue remain limited, initial results are encouraging. Further significant work remains to he done in order to fully assess the clinical performances of the tracer, on the one hand, and to determine its place relative to FDG and other emerging tracers, on the other hand. Until these studies are completed, FLT should he considered as a promising tracer, hut remaining at an experimental stage of its development. [less ▲]

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See detailLa 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F] fluorothymidine ([18F]-FLT) est-elle le prochain traceur utilise en routine pour la TEP apres le [18F]-FDG?
Couturier, Olivier; Leost, Francoise; Campone, Mario et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2005), 92(9), 789-98

Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG is now firmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-FDG is now firmly established as a clinical tool in oncology. Its applications are however limited in some indications, due to the lack of specificity of its uptake mechanism for tumors, or the low avidity of some cancer types such as prostate. Alternative tracers are thus being developed, in order to fill up this void. Proliferation as a biological target is particularly attractive in cancer imaging. From that perspective, fluorothymidine ([18F]-FLT or FLT) has generated a strong interest among the scientific community, especially since the radiosynthesis process has been improved and simplified, thus making possible to envision a routine use for the tracer. This article aims at summarizing the status of the current scientific data regarding FLT. The uptake mechanism of FLT is well known, relying on the thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) enzymatic activity, and thus on DNA synthesis. Preclinical studies have shown a clear relationship between tracer accumulation and level of tumor proliferation, even though DNA salvage pathwayss intervene in the process and may complicate the interpretation of the results. Several clinical studies suggest a good specificity for tumor, albeit with a lower sensitivity than with FDG. In all likelihood however, the future of FLT lies in the evaluation of antitumor response and possibly the pretherapeutic prognostic characterization, rather than in the diagnosis and staging of malignancies. Although the scientific data regarding this issue remain limited, initial results are encouraging. Further significant work remains to be done in order to fully assess the clinical performances of the tracer, on the one hand, and to determine its place relative to FDG and other emerging tracers, on the other hand. Until these studies are completed, FLT should be considered as a promising tracer, but remaining at an experimental stage of its development. [less ▲]

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See detailFluorinated analogs of nucleosides and fluorinated tracers of gene expression for positron emission tomography
Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-François; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Bulletin du Cancer (2004), 91(9), 695-703

F-18-FDG is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine 18 is considered as the ideal radioisotope for PET, thanks to a low positron energy ... [more ▼]

F-18-FDG is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine 18 is considered as the ideal radioisotope for PET, thanks to a low positron energy, which not only limits the dose rate to the patients but also provides high-resolution images. Furthermore, the 110 min. physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site, and imaging protocols that could span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessing metabolic processes that may be fairly slow Recently, synthesis of fluorinated tracers from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabeling of biomolecules, has given a boost to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers, Given the wide availability of fluorine 18, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated analogs of nucleosides and fluorinated radiotracers of gene expression recently developed and under investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailApport de la tomographie par émission de positons pour la détection des tumeurs primitives lors de la découverte de métastases
Albérini, Jean-Louis; Belhocine, Tarik; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in Bulletin du Cancer (2001), 88(5), 518-519

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See detailExpression of Bone Matrix Proteins in Human Breast Cancer: Potential Roles in Microcalcification Formation and in the Genesis of Bone Metastases
Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

in Bulletin du Cancer (1997), 84(1), 17-24

The skeleton is the privileged target of metastatic human breast cancer cells. Bone metastases are indeed found in virtually all advanced breast cancer patients and generate major morbidity. The high ... [more ▼]

The skeleton is the privileged target of metastatic human breast cancer cells. Bone metastases are indeed found in virtually all advanced breast cancer patients and generate major morbidity. The high osteotropism of breast cancer cells suggests that they exhibit a selective affinity for mineralized tissues. The observation that mammary malignant cells are able to induce hydroxyapatite crystals deposition within the primary tumour suggests that they can generate a microenvironment that favors the crystallization of calcium and phosphate ions into the bone specific hydroxyapatite. Osteonectin (OSN), osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP), 3 bone matrix proteins involved in bone matrix mineralization, are expressed in human breast cancers. BSP, an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) containing phosphoprotein, initiates hydroxyapatite deposition and mediates attachment of osteoclast to the same crystals prior to their resorption. Detection of BSP at both the protein and the mRNA levels in human breast cancer and in human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47-D and MDA-MB 231) indicates that mammary malignant cells synthesize directly BSP rather than uptaking it from the serum. Interestingly, the level of BSP expression correlates with the development of bone metastases and with poor survival. These data suggest that the ectopic expression of bone matrix proteins could be involved in conferring osteotropic properties to circulating metastatic breast cancer cells. These observations open new alleys of investigation for the identification of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the genesis of bone metastases. [less ▲]

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