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See detailSur la diffusion de la lumière par les solutions
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1899), XXXVII(4), 300-315

Spring, W. Chemiker-Zeitung (1899), 23, 375-77; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed Jully 15, 2010). Following its studies over the color water(see p ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Chemiker-Zeitung (1899), 23, 375-77; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed Jully 15, 2010). Following its studies over the color water(see p. 1011) reports authors over experiments concerning so-called shining of the liquids was examined particularly to solutions, D. hot liquids, those from molecules with different forces of attraction combined law. The used solutions disintegrate after their behavior into three groups: asymmetrical those of the alkali metal salts, education those of the ground compound/connection and heavy metal salts and C. those of the actual colloidal solutions only the solutions of the group of asymmetrical - were examined chlorides, bromides, chlorates and nitrates of sodium, potassium, ammonium, calcium and barium - can be represented without special difficulty optically empty(Tyndall), by distillation to one with usual water solution of these salts some drops of a colloidal iron, zinc or a cadmium oxide hydrate solution prepared add, the well jelly precipitation tear then all for portion cups with itself and leave an optically empty liquid. A similar clarifying of the solutions from the second group could not be accomplished because of the chemical reactions occurring thereby and the formation of basic salts. Author was content to compare a shining of the filtered solutions with that distilled water also filtered solutions the zinc, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, nickel old person behaved completely like distilled water, on the other hand solutions of aluminum, chrome, a, copper, mercury and lead salts made the electrical light bundle strongly visible. In by the dissociated effect water is formed for the latter trap on the salts a metal oxide hydrate, which, equal the colloids, which reflects light laterally. Addition decreased from HCl to the solutions(lead solution except for) corresponding shining, with the help of a strong light bundle one can recognize therefore the character of a solution. Clear one aqueous solutions of really colloidal substances such as gelatin, rubber arabicum, dextrine, alcoholic of colophony, sandarac, mastic, lacquer, furthermore stagnant Selfen solutions, diluted Solutions of alkali silicates, of different coloring materials as citizen of Berlin blue, Phenyl blue etc. show a constant strong light cone in each concentration. The past experiments could not decide the question, whether this light diffusion depends dissolved substances on the imperfect type of the solution or however on the molecular size, yet. From its observations author concludes that the clear can be separated solutions, which appear alike with usual lighting in intensive light into such asymmetrical, which behave as optically empty, and in education such, which reflects the light laterally. Only the first are chemically completely homogeneous, in them are an intimate mutual compound gel to assume with the solvent. That light-ether is closer in such a solution than everywhere in the empty area, but from same condensation. Those optically empty solutions are all also Electrolyte, the ions cause therefore no unequal condensation of light ether. In that it already cause the electrostatic forces before the light of a stream a regular distribution of the ions, so that these probably affect the refractive indexes, but the continuous light in its straight-line run cannot disturb. Although solutions that To group of education as electrolytes seem, steps the diffusion of the light only after suitable Diluted the solution up. Furthermore the salts of the metals concerned do not suffer an hydrolytic Dissociation, absolute homogeneity can any more exist, and consequently the hydrolysis is to be differentiated from the electrolytic Dissociation with respect to the light bundle. Finally come the solutions as really not electrolytic, i.e. as colloidal forwards, then they cause the diffusion of the light in each degrees of the Diluted u.7 can be never regarded as true transparent liquids. Substances with complicated molecules behave in an intensive light beam, similarly a molecular complex, therefore the majority of the organic bodies causes a light diffusion similarly colloidal solutions, but becomes shining organic liquids still more complicated by the occurrence of fluorescence features. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur la réalisation d'un liquide optiquement vide
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1899), XXXVII(3), 174-191

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1899), 37(3), 174-91; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1899), 37(3), 174-91; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). During had succeeded Tyndall to lead the proof that in completely clear, dust-free air the way of convergent, intensive light is not visible, is in liquids also with most careful purification after Lallemand the way of the light bundle to be always recognized. Lallemand believed that the molecules of the liquids take up and laterally disseminated the ether movement of the light that the lighting of the liquid is thus due by a luminous beam not to reflections at suspended parts, but to the lateral dispersion of the light by the molecules of the liquids. Also Soret had not succeeded it to clean water in such a way that it was on the inside illuminated by a light bundle; he believed however nevertheless that the lighting is due only to suspended materials. It, completely clear succeeded to the author, to manufacture optically empty water in which the way of a luminous beam is not visible. Also by most careful distillation water can be released not completely from clouding additions. Tap water even gave a distillate, which was cloudier, as the applied water. The filtration, in particular also by cotton wool, which cleans air perfectly, eliminated the turbidity, but did not increase it. On the other hand the production of a clear succeeded, from a light bundle did not illuminate water by the effect of a high-tension stream of small current on suspensions. In a U-pipe a suspension of silicic acid by a stream by 16 volts at the anode, predecting the silicic acid at the cathode was clarified set off perfectly. Similar results batten experiments with solutions of colloidal ferric oxide and with suspensions of zinc and cadmium hydroxide. It the complete removal of the turbidity is not based probably on the direct effect of the electrolysis, but on the coagulation of the suspended colloidal materials and thereby to cause entrainments of the turbidity. It succeeded also to make absolutely clear by chemical preparation of colloidal precipitations in water this to e.g. by Lime water in a solution of water-glass or of charring, and by formation of hydroxides of aluminum, iron, cadmium and zinc, whereby the containers must be always locked, since otherwise the water at air immediately takes up dust and thereby clouds themselves. The precipitation, which causes clarifying, must be colloidal; crystalline precipitation, like barium sulfate or calcium oxalate is almost non-active. Filtration water by colloidal precipitation clarifies the water likewise, if the filtrate does not find an opportunity to come with always dusty air into contact. Organic liquids could not be clarified by colloidal precipitations. That is partially because of it that the precipitation becomes complete only in presence of electrolytes, during the organic liquids usually no to electrolytes. The author believes that the translucence of organic liquids with more than four or five atoms carbon is to be led back not only to the mixed dust, but also to a natural Fluorescence. The translucence water after the principal matter probably not by the dust is even caused, but by finest, the dust stubborn adhering gas vesicles. These gas bubbles have different thickness and to show the most diverse spectral colors, even with dominance of the red and orange. The blue color the natural water cannot be caused therefore by selective reflection at the suspended materials. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur l'origine de la couleur bleue du ciel
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXVI(12), 504-518

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See detailSur l'origine de la fissilité des phyllades et des schistes
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXV(1), 31-34

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See detailSur la cause de l'absence de coloration de certaines eaux limpides naturelles
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1898), XXXVI(9-10), 266-276

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1898), 38(3), 266-76 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1898), 38(3), 266-76 ; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Tying to its earlier reports over the role of the iron compounds and the humin substances with the feature of the coloring of water and over the elimination of this substances under influence of sunlight, etc. (Bulletin Acad. roy. Bolgique [3] 34. 578; C. 98. I. 410 and Rec. trav. chim. Pays-Bas 17. 202; C. 98. II. 224) author the cause of the colorlessness many discusses clear waters, about what already Berzelius (Annual Report f. Chemistry 9. 207) expressed its astonishment. Terrestrial water only very rarely will appear blue, since in all ground are traces of hematite, and this the blue color water for our eye compensates. On the other hand the glaciers and the snow of high peaks do not contain hematite, water from high regions throw their blue and therefore can maintain their color. Furthermore the influence of the iron compounds on the coloring water is very differenct, depending on whether they are in the form of their hydrates or anhydrous oxides in the water; into latter trap they step with the Humin or the organic substances water not into reaction, the water more generally continues to appear colorless. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur l'hydrolyse du chlorure ferrique
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1897), XXXIV(8), 255-268

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See detailObservations sur l'hydrolyse du chlorure ferrique
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1897), XXXIV(8), 255-268

Spring, W. Bull. Acad. roy. Belgique (1897), 34(3), 255-68; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The decomposition of the ferric ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bull. Acad. roy. Belgique (1897), 34(3), 255-68; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The decomposition of the ferric chloride by water already shown of H. Debray (Bulletin of the Chemical Society, Paris 12. 346), after which researcher a very much diluted neutral, nearly colorless iron perchloride solution dissociates with heating up under strong coloring into hydrochloric acid and colloidal ferric oxide. Beside the latter F. W. Krecke (Journal pr. Chemistry 3. 286) found an iron oxychloride compound. After F. Wiedemann (Journal pr. Chemistry, 9. 145) the magnetism of the ferric chloride solutions consists of the sum of the magnetism of the iron in the colloidal oxide and the magnetism of the iron is not changed chloride and therefore no basic salts will give, in which the iron possesses its own atomic magnetism. The studied solutions were middle concentration (30% to 0.06%), however not border lines. Antony and Giglio (Chem.-Newspaper 1895. 325; C. 95. II. 858) the decomposition of the ferric chloride found completed in hydrogen chloride and colloidal hydrate after 24 hours according to colorimetric method with dilutions up to 0.00083%. The latter happens under temporary formation of chlorohydrates, [FeCl2.OH and FeCl(OH)2], which depending upon applied water conditions with hydrogen chloride equilibrium systems form and also cause during the dilution of the irregularities arising in the color of the solution. These changes in the color the line conduction of the iron perchloride solutions follows after Goodwin (Journal of Physik. Chemistry, 21. 1; C. 96. II. 998) a sufficient dilution of the first ionization of the ferric chloride causes, on which the ions (Fe) unite with the ions (OH) first to the colorless, bivalent ions Fe(OH), which gives the colloidal brown ferric hydroxide then with further ions of OH. xFe(OH)... + 2x(OH) = xFe(OH)3. The decomposition of the ferric chloride will exist therefore not in a simple hydrolysis in hydrate and hydrogen chloride, but will be accompanied by ionization features. Solutions concentrated by the author implemented experiments with ferric chloride resulted in the following. Sublimated ferric chloride Fe2Cl6 separates in water without decomposition then only if the relationship of the solvent is extraordinarily small. With the increase of the latter place shift takes place in the ferric chloride, whereby the delivery is prepared of two of the six chlorine atoms. The salt regards now as a composition of Ferrochloride and chlorine Fe2Cl4.Cl2, which dissociates with increase of water completely into the groups of the Fe2Cl4 and Cl2, if these groups can accept the neutral electrical condition. Chlorine in the status nascent reacts then with the water under formation of hydrogen chloride and oxygen, which transfer the group of Fe2Cl4 immediately into the Oxychloride Fe2Cl4O, which accepts the certain following structure: 3Fe2Cl4O = Fe2O3.2Fe2Cl6 and forms with hydrochloric acid and the water an equilibrium system modifying with the temperature. With still further dilution of the solution arrives by the designated phases at the complete decay. In van't Hoff's opinion about the nature of the solutions proven that the expansion of a salt draws the same consequences by its solvent, like those by increase of the temperature. Reaction of the potassium ferricyanide. Potassium ferricyanide does not give a low-brown color with ferric salt solutions of middle concentration, a clear reaction with a very much concentrated solution of ferric chloride (230%), with a 126% solution against it immediately a precipitation of citizen of Berlin blue and development of chlorine, from which it must be closed that the ferric chloride splits in the solution into Ferrochloride and chlorine: Fe2Cl6 = Fe2Cl4 + Cl2. Similarly behave after author ferric bromide, ferric iodide and ferric nitrate, only takes place slower at the latter the formation precipitation of citizen of Berlin-blue, therefore the dissociation: Fe2(NO3)4 + N2O5 + O seems to take place with difficulty; more rapidly the latter is caused with addition by some barium carbonate. Despite this behavior one may not really regard a solution of ferric chloride consisting of Fe2Cl4 and Cl2, as soon as chlorine leaves the compound, with the Fe2Cl4 and Cl2 an electrical charge is caused, whereby the Ferrochloride as cation and chlorine function as anion. Between these ions results an electrostatic attraction, which opposes its complete separation. Chlorine reacted with the water under formation from HCl, what latter by an air flow can be removed, while the oxygen remains connected with the group of Fe2Cl4 : Fe2Cl6 + H2O = Fe2Cl4O + 2HCl. About the reaction of the iron with ferric chloride. A metal plate from iron does not react nearly with a saturated ferric chloride solution. The iron separates into less concentrated solutions, all faster, the more easily these solutions with potassium ferricyanide give citizen of Berlin-blue. It is not the formation of the Ferrochloride, a consequence of the dissolution of the iron, but is from the latter cause, as due to the dissociation (see above) formed hydrochloric acid dissolves the iron under development of hydrogen. If with these location of the ferric chloride, the FeCl2 cation and Cl2 anion and between these ions make an electrostatic attraction valid (see above), then must have a difference of potential be stated and an electric current to be able to collected, whose intensity will depend on the dissociation of the ferric chloride. On the other hand, one will cause the delivery of the ions with the current conclusion, brings and/or the dispersion of FeCl2 and Cl2 without difficulty to conditions - an opinion, which was confirmed by the experiment. A small platinum cap flat at the reason is fastened on by means of metal catch of the ends of a galvanometer, given into the same a confirmed FeCl3-solution (laminate 5-6 mm) and brought a small iron disk (2 cm diameters)on the surface of the liquid which is connected with the other end of the galvanometer. In instants of the contact, the needle turn out into violent oscillations and places with the division 54°. After 4 hours, 4 cg had more separated iron than in a simultaneous experiment which the flow was not closed. The latter went from the iron to platinum, so that this cathode and the iron were anode. With the use of more diluted solutions of FeCl3 increases the intensity of the flow up to a solution of 40%, on which it decreases with the further dilution regularly, thus it goes through a maximum. Also the ease give with solutions of ferric chloride citizen of Berlin-blue under delivery of chlorine, walks by a maximum. In the end it is noticed that the investigations of the author, also contribute to the answer of the question of the molecular formula of the ferric chloride, which after the density of the formula Fe2Cl6, according to the b.p.-method in alcohol or ether solution however comes the formula FeCl3. It is still determined whether the place mixture of chlorine in the ferric chloride has solution not also in alcoholic or ethers. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur le spectre d'absorption de quelques corps organiques incolores et ses relations avec la structure moléculaire
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1897), XXXIII(3), 165-195

Spring, W. Bull. Acad. roy. Belgique (1897), 33(3), 165-95; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The available, very detailed work ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bull. Acad. roy. Belgique (1897), 33(3), 165-95; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). The available, very detailed work follows the observations of the author's on the color water. During view of very thick layers of organic products author finds also the so-called uncolored compounds colored and observes that all compounds, which contain a hydroxyl group show a blue color, which all the more approaches the color water, when those is short the OH the following carbon chain. If the hydroxyl group is missing, then the products possess more or less deep, gold-yellow color. The spectral investigations more numerously, in groups of matching, organic compounds leads to the following general conclusions: The so-called uncolored organic compounds give a spectrum without absorption bands, if you consist mole of carbon chains, around those the heterologous atoms or groups in a homogeneous or symmetrical way distributed are. If these heterologous atoms or groups are however concentrated at an end of a chain or combines, then the compounds concerned give spectra with absorption bands. The number of the absorption bands seems to stand in direct relation to the number of the hydrocarbon remainders, which one can differentiate with respect to the examined compound; thus an ester two strips, their the acid radical, give whose different one corresponds to the alkyl, while the acid or the alcohol spectra with ever only one strip supplies. The position of the strips seems to be characteristic for each of the groups and remains generally the same, much with which other group the first being connected likes to apply only with more complicated compounds seems this rule not. If two groups are very closely with each other connected, then the positions of the individual absorption bands changed by the mutual influence (methyl benzene), it unite occasionally even to gang. Generally author regards his observations as a support of the ideas and the modern theory of the organic compounds, introduced by Kekuele into the science. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSur le rôle des composés ferriques et des matières humiques dans le phénomène de la coloration des eaux et sur l'élimination de ces substances sous l'influence de la lumière solaire
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1897), XXXIV(9-10), 578-600

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1897), 34(3), 578-600; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Bulletin de la Classe des Sciences, Academie Royale de Belgique (1897), 34(3), 578-600; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Authors investigation in 5 m are enough for pipe diluted solutions of ferric chloride on the one hand and of Humin substances (peat water) on the other hand on their color. One compares the dilution concerned with the content to iron and organic substances of our seas, lakes and flux, then it resulted that the water of these natural runs and basins would have to look to black brown instead of blue to green. An explanation for this difference resulted from the experiment to examine a mixture of diluted ferric salt solution and Humin substances solution for its color. Such a mixture is colored in the beginning dark, but under the influence of light more brightly and more brightly, as turbidity sit down to ground. The Humin substances is oxidized and to connect itself in more highly oxidized with metal oxides to insoluble compounds. With this process ferric oxide is reduced to ferrous oxide, whose color is hardly possible. Ferrous oxide can take up oxygen from air in the natural water again and exercise now as ferric compound its function with the elimination one the Humin substances again. Author compares the achievement of the iron with the purification the natural water with the achievement of hemoglobin in the animal blood. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDe la température à laquelle les courants de convection commencent à produire l'opacité d'une colonne d'eau d'une longueur donnée
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1896), XXXI(3), 256-260

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See detailSur la couleur et le spectre lumineux de quelques corps organiques
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1896), XXXII(7), 43-51

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See detailSur la transparence des solutions de sels incolores
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1896), XXXI(6), 640-654

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See detailSur la couleur des alcools comparée à la couleur de l'eau
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1896), XXXI(3), 246-256

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See detailSur le rôle des courants de convection calorifique dans le phénomène de l'illumination des eaux limpides
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1896), XXXI(2), 94-110

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See detailSur les modifications physiques que subissent certains sulfures sous l'influence de la température
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1895), XXX(9-10), 311-319

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See detailDe l'influence du temps sur l'agglutination de la craie comprimée
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in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1895), XXX(9-10), 320-326

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See detailSur un hydrate de trisulfure d'arsenic et sa décomposition par la compression
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1895), XXX(8), 199-203

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See detailSur la chaleur spécifique du peroxyde d'hydrogène
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1895), XXIX(4), 479-489

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See detailSur la couleur, la densité et la tension superficielle du peroxyde d'hydrogène
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1895), XXIX(3), 363-384

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See detailRecherches sur les conditions dans lesquelles le peroxyde d'hydrogène se décompose
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-arts de Belgique. Sciences. 3e série (1895), XXX(7), 32-55

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