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See detailEccentric training for elbow hypermobility
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Delvaux, François ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2014, April), 48(7), 154

Background: Patients with hypermobility suffer from joints problems and chronic pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Objective: Eccentric muscle strengthening could be very important to protect ... [more ▼]

Background: Patients with hypermobility suffer from joints problems and chronic pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Objective: Eccentric muscle strengthening could be very important to protect hypermobile joints. Design: Case report. Patient: A girl (16 y.o.) affected by an Ehler-Danlos syndrome presented pain in the right elbow and the right wrist after a season of tennis. Interventions: Her training consisted of wrist prono-supination and flexion-extension muscle group reinforcement and proprioceptive training. To protect the wrist against excessive load, the eccentric strengthening exercises of prono-supinator and flexor-extensor muscles of elbow and wrist were undertaken gradually, at increasing speeds within a limited range of motion in flexion and extension, on an isokinetic device after an evaluation. She was also given an orthesis restricting the joint range of motion of the wrist. Main outcome measurements: The evaluation was made by isokinetic evaluation, visual analog scale and MOS-SF36 questionnaire before and after training. Results: The patient rapidly noted a decrease in pain and an increase in the stability of her right arm even when playing tennis. Isokinetic evaluation objectified a significant improvement in maximal torque in flexion-extension muscles of the right elbow. She was also given individualized home exercises. Conclusions: The goal of this eccentric training is to avoid hypermobility by using the muscles as a protective brake in the control of joint positioning. Muscles can be reinforced in eccentric mode with starting position at the maximum length of these muscles when unstreched. The exercises can be carried out safely on an isokinetic device, at slow speed and limited range of joint motion to avoid risk of luxation. Thus, in this case report, the eccentric exercises using an isokinetic device were effective to safely reinforce the muscles as a protective brake for joint hypermobility and prevent pain during practicing tennis. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo biomarkers for the screening of cardiac risk among runners ?
LE GOFF, Caroline ULg; Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2014, April), 48(7), 174

Background Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is a low molecular weight protein involved in the intracellular uptake and buffering of long chain fatty in the myocardium. Troponin T is a ... [more ▼]

Background Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is a low molecular weight protein involved in the intracellular uptake and buffering of long chain fatty in the myocardium. Troponin T is a component of the contractile apparatus of the striated musculature. Both are early markers for acute coronary syndrome. Objective The aim of our study was to compare the results obtained with the H-FABP and the highly sensitive cardiac troponins (hsTnT) and to test their cardiospecificity in healthy runners. Design Prospective, cohort study. Setting Amateur marathon runners. Patients 23 runners (marathon) were enrolled. Interventions We drowned blood samples at three times: just before (T0), just after (T1), and three hours after the end of the race (T3). Main outcome measurements H-FABP and hs-TnT were performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. A linear regression was calculated to observe if there is any correlation between the two biomarkers. Values above the 95th percentile for H-FABP (2.5 ng/mL) and the 99th percentile for hsTnT (14 ng/L) were considered as positive. Results At T0, none of the subjects were positive for hsTnT but 35% were positive for H-FABP; at T1, 83% for hsTnT and 100% for H-FABP; at T3, 83% for hsTnT and 96% for H-FABP. At T0, the regression equation was H-FABP T0=3.9454–0.1001×hsTnT T0; at T1: H-FABP T1=51.838–1.7026×hsTnT T1; at T3: H-FABP T3=47.977–1.6193×hsTnT T3. No correlation was observed between the 2 biomarkers. Conclusion We observed a significant increase of H-FABP and hsTnT in runners. These markers are independent to each other. These values could biologically correspond to a heart ischemia. These biomarkers could be helpful for the screening of cardiac risk among runners. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides in runners: useful for cardiac risk screening ?
LE GOFF, Caroline ULg; Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2014, April), 48(7), 173

Background Cardiac troponins (cTn) are considered as the best biomarkers for detection of myocardial cell injury and NT-proBNP as the best for the cardiac insufficiency. Objective Our aim was to compare ... [more ▼]

Background Cardiac troponins (cTn) are considered as the best biomarkers for detection of myocardial cell injury and NT-proBNP as the best for the cardiac insufficiency. Objective Our aim was to compare cTnT and NT-proBNP levels before and after the stress tests, in sportive subjects. Design Prospective, cohort study. Setting Amateur marathon runners and ultrarunners. Patients 28 subjects (26 men, 42.5±11 yrs) were enrolled. Interventions Subjects ran the Maasmarathon (42.195 kilometers) and 33 subjects (33 men, 45.7±9.3 yrs) ran the Ultratour of Liège (Belgium; 67 km). All subjects gave their informed consent. We took blood sample before (T0), just after (T1) and 3 hours after the race (T3). Main outcome measurements cTnT concentrations were measured by high sensitive methods (hsTnT, Roche Diagnostics) on heparin plasma. The NT-proBNP was also determined with the kit Roche on heparin plasma. All statistical analyses were performed using Medcalc version 8.1 for Windows. P-value <.01 was regarded as statistically significant. Results A significant difference between hsTnT concentrations at T0 and T1 (P<.001), and between T0 and T3 (P<.001) for NT-proBNP have been observed, but not between T1 and T3. This observation appeared only after a strenuous exercise. However, up to now this type of exercise is not reproducible easily in a laboratory. Moreover, nobody knows if these observations would have cardiac consequences at long terms. Conclusion Measurement of cardiac troponins by high sensitive methods allows detecting significant release of biomarkers from the heart during exercise. The value of NT-proBNP are also significant but less than TnThs. We think that the TnThs could be an interesting tool in the future to help sport medicine to detect risk of developing a cardiac problem in the future or a sudden death. [less ▲]

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See detailEccentric training improves tendon biomechanical properties: a rat model
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Libertiaux, Vincent et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2014, April), 48(7), 155

Background: Even if eccentric exercises appear favourable in primary prevention of tendons lesions and, especially, in secondary prevention after tendinopathy, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are ... [more ▼]

Background: Even if eccentric exercises appear favourable in primary prevention of tendons lesions and, especially, in secondary prevention after tendinopathy, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are not yet clear. Objective: We aimed to better define the biomechanical changes that affect healthy tendon after eccentric and concentric training. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Participants: Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats of 2 months. Interventions: The six rats in the control group (U) were not subjected to physical exercise. The 12 remaining rats (6 in each group) ran on a treadmill set at a +15° incline for concentric training (C) or a -15° incline for eccentric training (E), at a speed of 17 m/min for 1 h, three times per week for 5 weeks. Main Outcome Measurements: The tricipital, patellar and Achilles tendons were subsequently removed to perform a traction test until rupture, and a histological analysis was performed. Results: There was a significant improvement in the rupture force of the patellar and tricipital tendons between the U and E groups. The tricipital tendons in the control group presented a significantly smaller cross-section than the E- and C-trained groups, but none between E and C groups. No significant difference was observed for the mechanical stress at rupture per surface unit between the three groups for all three tendons. However, a tendency towards improvement these values was observed between the trained and the U groups for the patellar tendon. Histological studies demonstrated the tendency of the development of a greater number of blood vessels and a larger quantity of collagen in the eccentric group. Conclusions: The mechanical properties of tendons in rats improve after specific training, especially following eccentric training. Our results partly explained how mechanical loading, especially in eccentric mode, could improve the tendon structure. [less ▲]

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See detailPlatelet-rich plasma (PRP) to treat chronic upper patellar tendinopathies
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2013, July), 47(10 (e3)), 15

Background: Upper patellar tendinopathies remain often chronic and rebel to a thorough conservative treatment. Moreover, the option of a surgical treatment could be disappointing. New treatments are being ... [more ▼]

Background: Upper patellar tendinopathies remain often chronic and rebel to a thorough conservative treatment. Moreover, the option of a surgical treatment could be disappointing. New treatments are being developed. Injection of PRP is one of these. Platelets contain lot of growth factors which would have the potentiality to enhance the healing process of tendons. Even if in vitro and animal experiments have demonstrated this stimulation of tendon healing process1, clinical series are subject to controversy2. Methods: Twenty patients with chronic upper patellar tendinopathy were enrolled. Assessments [VAS, clinical examination with an algometer, algofunctional scores (IKDC and VISA-P), functional assessments (isokinetic and Optojump) and imagery (ultrasounds and MRI)]were made before infiltration of PRP, and 6 weeks and 3 months after. The PRP was obtained by an apheresis system (COM.TEC, Fresenius). Six millilitres of PRP were injected without local anaesthetic. One week after infiltration, patients started a 6-week standardised sub-maximal eccentric reeducation. Results: We observed a very significant improvement of the algofunctional status as soon as 6 weeks after the infiltration of PRP, and continued to a lesser extent up to 3 months. During functional evaluation, pain decreased as well, but without significant improvement of performances. No significant improvements in the imagery were observed. Interestingly, patients who had a VAS equal or below 1 after 3 months post-infiltration were younger (24.7 vs 32.2 y.o.). Moreover, these younger patients had a significant increase of the IKDC score (p=0.003), a significant improvement of pain during isokinetic evaluations (p<0.05), and during Optojump assessments (p=0.01). Seventy-five percent of subjects were able to return to sport, even if only half of these patients recovered the same level than before the tendinopathy. Discussion / Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a local infiltration of PRP associated with a submaximal eccentric protocol is efficient to improve symptoms of chronic upper patellar tendinopathies, non-responsive to classical conservative treatments. However, up to now, there is no consensus on the method to prepare the PRP. Indeed, each technique could provide a very different PRP (variations in the platelet concentrations and of the amount of red and white cells). [less ▲]

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See detailExuberant inflammatory reaction after an infiltration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; LEONARD, Philippe ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2013, June), 47(10 (e3)), 92

Background: PRP, obtained from centrifuged autologous blood, contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance the tissue healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively ... [more ▼]

Background: PRP, obtained from centrifuged autologous blood, contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance the tissue healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively new treatment for tendinopathies. To date, no side effects have been reported after infiltration of PRP to treat tendinopathy. Case report: A 35-year-old patient had a right upper patellar tendinopathy which was resistant to all conservative treatments for more than 6 months. The patient was a type 1 diabetic (well controlled). He had an intratendinous infiltration of 6 mL of PRP (8.105 platelets/mm3, almost no red or white blood cells) after disinfection but without local anaesthetic. Immediately following the infiltration, local cryotherapy was performed for 15 minutes. NSAIDs were avoided, but class-1 or -2 pain-killers were authorised if necessary. A standardised sub-maximal eccentric rehabilitation should have been started 1 week after. However, the patient experienced local swelling with erythema, increased heating and pain which appeared just underneath the patella, but without biological inflammatory syndrome. A great Doppler signal in a thicker patellar tendon was observed by US, but there was no sign of local infectious disease demonstrated by either CT or MRI. However, the local inflammation did not decrease after a progressive 3-week treatment of local cryotherapy, local and oral NSAIDs and colchicine 1 mg. Thus, an insidious infection was suspected, even though there was neither evidence of biological inflammatory syndrome nor sign of infectious lesion on imagery examination. An antibiotic therapy (rifampicine 600 mg + minocycline 100 mg) was initiated for 3 months. Finally, a 3-phase bone scintigraphy suggested the presence of a complex regional pain syndrome type 1 treated by a classical physical therapy and concomitant class-2 pain killers. The evolution was favourable after 6 months of symptomatic treatment, and the pain decreased to a level similar to that before the infiltration of PRP. Discussion/Conclusions: This case report draws attention to potential side effects that are linked to this new therapy by infiltration of platelet rich plasma in case of tendinopathy, in particular when used in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thus, the balance between benefits and risks must be carefully evaluated before using this treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes. Reference: Platelet-rich plasma application in the management of chronic tendinopathies. Acta Orthop Belg 2013; 79: 10-15. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of practice characteristics on injury risk in young athletes
Frisch, Anne; Urhausen, A.; Seil, R. et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011, April), 45

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See detailPlatelet-rich plasma (PRP) and tendon healing: animal model
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Renouf, Julien et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011, February), 45(2), 1

Introduction: The tendon is a tissue which does not heal easily. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the positive effects of platelets on the healing process of tendons. A local injection of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The tendon is a tissue which does not heal easily. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the positive effects of platelets on the healing process of tendons. A local injection of platelet–rich plasma (PRP), which releases in situ many growth factors, has the potentiality to enhance the tendon healing process. The aim of our experiment was to ascertain by an original mechanical measure whether the use of PRP was of interest for accelerating the healing process of rats’ Achilles tendons after surgical induced lesion. Methods: A 5mm defect was surgically induced in 90 rats’ Achilles tendon. Rats were divided into 2 groups of 45: (A) control (no treatment) and (B) PRP treatment. Rats of group B received a PRP injection in situ after the surgery. Afterwards, rats of both groups were placed in their cages without immobilization. After 5, 15 and 30 days, 10 traumatized Achilles tendons of each group were dissected and removed. Immediately after sampling, tendons were submitted to a biomechanical tensile test up to rupture, using a “Cryo-jaw”. After that, transcriptomic analyses were made on the tendon samples, to study the expression of type III collagen, matrix metalloproteases and tenomodulin. A hydroxyproline dosage was done to quantify the collagen in the tendon during its healing process. Tendons of the 15 remaining rats of each group were subjected to a histological study, respectively at day 5, 15 and 30 (5 rats for each time). Results: We demonstrated that the force necessary to induce tendon rupture during biomechanical tensile test study was greater for tendons which had been submitted to an injection of PRP compared to the control group: +19% (day 5), +30% (day 15) and +43% (day 30). Histological study showed that PRP could enhance cells proliferation, angiogenesis and collagen organisation. Our biochemical analyses did not explain beneficial effects of PRP. Indeed, there was no significant difference neither between the expression of different studied genes, nor in the quantity of hydroxyproline between both groups. Conclusion: This experimentation has shown that a PRP injection could accelerate the tendons healing process and improve its quality. [less ▲]

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See detailOral salt supplementation and long-distance exercise
Lehance, Cédric ULg; Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg; Counet, Laurence ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011), 45

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See detailEFFECT OF DIFFERENT WARMING-UP PROTOCOLS ON TIME TO EXHAUSTION AT MAXIMAL AEROBIC SPEED
Rodriguez de la Cruz, Carlos ULg; Brennenraedts, C.; Bury, Thierry ULg

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011), 45

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See detailInfluence of practice characteristics on injury risk in young athletes
Frisch, Anne ULg; Urhausen, Axel; Seil, Romain et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2011), 45

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See detailAn isokinetic eccentric programme for the management of chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite ULg; Tinant, France ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2007), 41(4), 269-275

Background: Lateral epicondylitis represents a frequent overuse injury. In spite of many conservative treatment procedures, prolonged symptoms and relapse are frequently observed. Objective: To compare ... [more ▼]

Background: Lateral epicondylitis represents a frequent overuse injury. In spite of many conservative treatment procedures, prolonged symptoms and relapse are frequently observed. Objective: To compare the outcome of patients performing an isokinetic eccentric training with that of age-, gender-, activity-matched patients receiving a non-strengthening classical rehabilitation. Methods: Ninety-two patients with unilateral chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy (mean duration of symptoms 8 +/- 3 months) were assigned either to a control group (n = 46) or to an eccentrically trained group (n = 46). The control group underwent a passive standardised rehabilitation programme that excluded strengthening exercises. In addition to this programme, the trained group also performed eccentric exercises based on the repetitive lengthening of the active musculo-tendinous unit. The latter exercises started with submaximal contraction intensity and slow speed movement. Modalities were progressively intensified (increase in intensity contraction and speed movement) over a long priod of treatment. Programme effectiveness was assessed through pain score evaluation, a disability questionnaire, muscle strength measurement and ultrasonographic examination. Results: Compared to the non-strengthening control group, the following observations were made in the eccentrically trained group: (1) a significantly more marked reduction of pain intensity, mainly after one month of treatment; (2) an absence of strength deficit on the involved side through bilateral comparison for the forearm supinator and wrist extensor muscles; (3) an improvement of the tendon image as demonstrated by decreasing thickness and a recovered homogenous tendon structure; and (4) a more marked improvement in disability status during occupational, spare time and sports activities. Conclusion: These results highlight the relevance of implementing isokinetic adapted eccentric training in the management of chronic lateral epicondylar tendinopathy. [less ▲]

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See detailPreseason isokinetic intervention as a preventive strategy for hamstring injury in professional soccer players
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Ganteaume, S.; Ferret, J. M.

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2005, June), 39(6), 379

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