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See detailFGF receptor genes and breast cancer susceptibility: results from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium
Agarwal, Divianch; Pineda San Juan, Silvia ULg; Milne, Roger

in British Journal of Cancer (2014)

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See detailIs it possible to improve the breaking bad news skills of residents when a relative is present? A randomised study.
Merckaert, Isabelle; Liénard, Aurore; Libert, Yves et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2013), 109

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See detailCurcumin-cyclodextrin complexes potentiate gemcitabine effects in an orthotopic mouse model of lung cancer.
Rocks, Natacha ULg; Bekaert, Sandrine ULg; Coia, I et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2012), 107(7), 1083-92

Background:Overall clinical outcome for advanced lung cancer remains very disappointing despite recent advances in treatment. Curcumin has been reported as potentially active against cancer.Methods:Owing ... [more ▼]

Background:Overall clinical outcome for advanced lung cancer remains very disappointing despite recent advances in treatment. Curcumin has been reported as potentially active against cancer.Methods:Owing to poor curcumin solubility, we have used cyclodextrins (CD) as an excipient allowing a considerable increase of aqueous solubility and bioavailability of curcumin. The effects of solubilised curcumin have been evaluated in cell cultures as well as in an in vivo orthotopic lung tumour mouse model.Results:Cell proliferation was reduced while apoptosis rates were increased when lung epithelial tumour cells were cultured in the presence of curcumin-CD complexes. For in vivo experiments, cells were grafted into lungs of C57Bl/6 mice treated by an oral administration of a non-soluble form of curcumin, CDs alone or curcumin-CD complexes, combined or not with gemcitabine. The size of orthotopically implanted lung tumours was reduced upon curcumin complex administration as compared with treatments with placebo or non-solubilised curcumin. Moreover, curcumin potentiated the gemcitabine-mediated antitumour effects.Conclusion:Our data demonstrate that curcumin, when given orally in a CD-solubilised form, reduces lung tumour size in vivo. In vitro experiments show impaired tumour cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, our data underline a potential additive effect of curcumin with gemcitabine thus providing an efficient therapeutic option for antilung cancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailHPV DNA testing in population-based cervical screening (VUSA-Screen study): results and implications.
Rijkaart, D. C.; Berkhof, J.; van Kemenade, F. J. et al

in British journal of cancer (2012), 106(5), 975-81

BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more sensitive than cytology for detecting high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). We evaluated the performance of high-risk HPV (hrHPV ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more sensitive than cytology for detecting high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). We evaluated the performance of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) testing in routine screening. METHODS: In all, 25,871 women (29-61) enrolled in our population-based cohort study were offered both cytology and hrHPV testing. High-risk HPV-positive women with normal cytology and an age-matched subcohort of hrHPV-negative women with normal cytology were invited for repeat testing after 1 and/or 2 years and were referred for colposcopy if they presented with abnormal cytology and/or a positive hrHPV test. The hrHPV-positive women with borderline or mild dyskaryosis (BMD) and all women with moderate dyskaryosis or worse (>BMD) were directly referred for colposcopy. Women with BMD and an hrHPV-negative test were advised to repeat cytology at 6 and 18 months and were referred for colposcopy if the repeat cytology test was abnormal. The main outcome measure was CIN grade 3 or worse (CIN3+). Results were adjusted for non-attendance at repeat testing. RESULTS: The hrHPV-positive women with abnormal cytology had a CIN3+ risk of 42.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 36.4-48.2), whereas the hrHPV-positive women with normal cytology had a much lower risk of 5.22% (95% CI: 3.72-7.91). In hrHPV-positive women with normal cytology, an additional cytology step after 1 year reduced the CIN3+ risk to only 1.6% (95% CI: 0.6-4.9) if the repeat test was normal. The CIN3+ risk in women with hrHPV-positive normal cytology was higher among women invited for the first time (29-33 years of age) (9.1%; 95% CI: 5.6-14.3) than among older women (3.0%; 95% CI: 1.5-5.5). CONCLUSION: Primary hrHPV screening with cytology triage in women aged >/=30 years is an effective way to stratify women on CIN3+ risk and seems a feasible alternative to cytological screening. Repeat cytology after 1 year for hrHPV-positive women with normal cytology is however necessary before returning women to routine screening. [less ▲]

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See detailIs it possible to improve residents breaking bad news skills? A randomised study assessing the efficacy of a communication skills training program
Liénard, A.; Merckaert, I.; Libert, Y. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2010), 103

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See detailMechanisms of HTLV-1 persistence and transformation.
Boxus, Mathieu ULg; Willems, Luc ULg

in British Journal of Cancer (2009), 101(9), 1497-501

Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to persist and replicate in the presence of a strong immune response. In ... [more ▼]

Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to persist and replicate in the presence of a strong immune response. In this review, we summarise these mechanisms and their contribution to T-cell transformation and ATL development. [less ▲]

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See detailAntitumor and anti-angiogenic effects of aplidin in the 5T33MM model, syngeneic model of multiple myeloma
Caers, Jo ULg; De Raeve, Hendrik; Lepage, Doreen et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2008), 98(12), 1966-74

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See detailThe contribution of large genomic deletions at the CDKN2A locus to the burden of familial melanoma.
Lesueur, F.; de Lichy, M.; Barrois, M. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2008), 99(2), 364-70

Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the ... [more ▼]

Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the CDKN2A locus at 9p21, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Rare mutations in CDK4 have also been linked to the disease. Although the CDKN2A gene has been shown to be the major melanoma predisposing gene, there remains a significant proportion of melanoma kindreds linked to 9p21 in which germline mutations of CDKN2A have not been identified through direct exon sequencing. The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of large rearrangements in CDKN2A to the disease in melanoma-prone families using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. We examined 214 patients from independent pedigrees with at least two CMM cases. All had been tested for CDKN2A and CDK4 point mutation, and 47 were found positive. Among the remaining 167 negative patients, one carried a novel genomic deletion of CDKN2A exon 2. Overall, genomic deletions represented 2.1% of total mutations in this series (1 of 48), confirming that they explain a very small proportion of CMM susceptibility. In addition, we excluded a new gene on 9p21, KLHL9, as being a major CMM gene. [less ▲]

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See detailThe contribution of HPV18 to cervical cancer is underestimated using high-grade CIN as a measure of screening efficiency.
BULK, Saskia ULg; Berkhof, J.; Rozendaal, L. et al

in British journal of cancer (2007), 96(8), 1234-6

In one geographical area, 14 high-risk human papillomavirus types in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3; n=139) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n=84) were analysed. HPV18 was more ... [more ▼]

In one geographical area, 14 high-risk human papillomavirus types in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3; n=139) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n=84) were analysed. HPV18 was more prevalent in SCC than CIN2/3 (OR 9.8; 95% confidence interval: 2.5-39). Other high-risk types prevalences corresponded in CIN2/3 and SCC. Evaluations using CIN2/3 as a measure of efficiency underestimate the contribution of HPV18 to SCC. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-risk HPV type-specific clearance rates in cervical screening.
Bulkmans, N. W. J.; Berkhof, J.; BULK, Saskia ULg et al

in British journal of cancer (2007), 96(9), 1419-24

We assessed clearance rates of 14 high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types in hrHPV-positive women with normal cytology and borderline/mild dyskaryosis (BMD) in a population-based cervical screening ... [more ▼]

We assessed clearance rates of 14 high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types in hrHPV-positive women with normal cytology and borderline/mild dyskaryosis (BMD) in a population-based cervical screening cohort of 44,102 women. The 6-month hrHPV type-specific clearance rates, that is, clearance of the same type as detected at baseline, in women with normal and BMD smears were 43% (95% confidence interval (CI) 39-47) and 29% (95% CI 24-34), respectively. Corresponding 18-month clearance rates were markedly higher, namely 65% (95% CI 60-69) and 41% (95% CI 36-47), respectively. The lowest clearance rates in women with normal cytology were observed for HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV33. Significantly reduced 18-month clearance rates at a significance level of 1% were observed for HPV16 (49%, 95% CI 41-59) and HPV31 (50%, 95% CI 39-63) in women with normal cytology, and for HPV16 (19%, 95% CI 12-29) in women with BMD. Among women who did not clear hrHPV, women with HPV16 persistence displayed an increased detection rate of >or=CIN3 (normal P<0.0001; BMD, P=0.005). The type-specific differences in clearance rates indicate the potential value of hrHPV genotyping in screening programs. Our data support close surveillance (i.e. referral directly, or within 6 months) of women with HPV16 and are inconclusive for surveillance of women with HPV18, HPV31, and HPV33. For the other hrHPV-positive women, it seems advisable to adopt a conservative management with a long waiting period, as hrHPV clearance is markedly higher after 18 months than after 6 months and the risk for >or=CIN3 is low. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM and ADAMTS) enzymes in human non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC)
Rocks, Natacha ULg; Paulissen, Geneviève ULg; Quesada Calvo, Florence ULg et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2006), 94(5), 724-730

A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) are transmembrane proteases displaying multiple functions. ADAM with ThromboSpondin-like motifs (ADAMTS) are secreted proteases characterised by thrombospondin (TS ... [more ▼]

A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) are transmembrane proteases displaying multiple functions. ADAM with ThromboSpondin-like motifs (ADAMTS) are secreted proteases characterised by thrombospondin (TS) motifs in their C-terminal domain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the expression pattern of ADAMs and ADAMTS in non small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) and to investigate the possible correlation between their expression and cancer progression. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed on NSCLC samples and corresponding nondiseased tissue fragments. Among the ADAMs evaluated (ADAM-8, -9, -10, -12, -15, -17, ADAMTS-1, TS-2 and TS-12), a modulation of ADAM-12 and ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression was observed. Amounts of ADAM-12 mRNA transcripts were increased in tumour tissues as compared to the corresponding controls. In sharp contrast, ADAMTS-1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumour tissues when compared to corresponding nondiseased lung. These results were corroborated at the protein level by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. A positive correlation was observed between the mRNA levels of ADAM-12 and those of two vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A isoforms (VEGF-A(165) and VEGF-A(121)). Taken together, these results providing evidence for an overexpression of ADAM-12 and a lower expression of ADAMTS-1 in non-small-cell lung cancer suggest that these proteases play different functions in cancer progression. [less ▲]

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See detailCPT-11 and concomitant hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy induce efficient local control in rectal cancer patients: results from a phase II
Voelter, V; Zouhair, A; Vuilleumier, H et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2006), 95

Patients with rectal cancer are at high risk of disease recurrence despite neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil (5FU), a <br />regimen that is now widely applied. In order to develop a ... [more ▼]

Patients with rectal cancer are at high risk of disease recurrence despite neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil (5FU), a <br />regimen that is now widely applied. In order to develop a regimen with increased antitumour activity, we previously established the <br />recommended dose of neoadjuvant CPT-11 (three times weekly 90 mgm 2) concomitant to hyperfractionated accelerated <br />radiotherapy (HART) followed by surgery within 1 week. Thirty-three patients (20 men) with a locally advanced adenocarcinoma of <br />the rectum were enrolled in this prospective phase II trial (1 cT2, 29 cT3, 3 cT4 and 21 cNþ). Median age was 60 years (range 43– <br />75 years). All patients received all three injections of CPT-11 and all but two patients completed radiotherapy as planned. Surgery <br />with total mesorectal excision (TME) was performed within 1 week (range 2–15 days). The preoperative chemoradiotherapy was <br />overall well tolerated, 24% of the patients experienced grade 3 diarrhoea that was easily manageable. At a median follow-up of 2 <br />years no local recurrence occurred, however, nine patients developed distant metastases. The 2-year disease-free survival was 66% <br />(95% confidence interval 0.48–0.83). Neoadjuvant CPT-11 and HART allow for excellent local control; however, distant relapse <br />remains a concern in this patient population. [less ▲]

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See detailPreferential risk of HPV16 for squamous cell carcinoma and of HPV18 for adenocarcinoma of the cervix compared to women with normal cytology in The Netherlands.
BULK, Saskia ULg; Berkhof, J.; Bulkmans, N. W. J. et al

in British journal of cancer (2006), 94(1), 171-5

We present the type-distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women with normal cytology (n=1467), adenocarcinoma in situ (ACIS) (n=61), adenocarcinoma (n=70), and squamous cell ... [more ▼]

We present the type-distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women with normal cytology (n=1467), adenocarcinoma in situ (ACIS) (n=61), adenocarcinoma (n=70), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n=83). Cervical adenocarcinoma and ACIS were significantly more frequently associated with HPV18 (OR(MH) 15.0; 95% CI 8.6-26.1 and 21.8; 95% CI 11.9-39.8, respectively) than normal cytology. Human papillomavirus16 was only associated with adenocarcinoma and ACIS after exclusion of HPV18-positive cases (OR(MH) 6.6; 95% CI 2.8-16.0 and 9.4; 95% CI 2.8-31.2, respectively). For SCC, HPV16 prevalence was elevated (OR(MH) 7.0; 95% CI 3.9-12.4) compared to cases with normal cytology, and HPV18 prevalence was only increased after exclusion of HPV16-positive cases (OR(MH) 4.3; 95% CI 1.6-11.6). These results suggest that HPV18 is mainly a risk factor for the development of adenocarcinoma whereas HPV16 is associated with both SCC and adenocarcinoma. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased risk of breast cancer among female relatives of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia: a causal relationship?
d'Almeida, A. K.; Cavaciuti, E.; Dondon, M. G. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2005), 93(6), 730-732

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See detailInvasion and MMP expression profile in desmoid tumours.
Denys, H.; De Wever, O.; Nusgens, Betty ULg et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2004), 90(7), 1443-9

Desmoid tumours are locally invasive soft tissue tumours in which beta-catenin mediated TCF-dependent transcription is activated. The role of soluble factors secreted by the myofibroblastic desmoid tumour ... [more ▼]

Desmoid tumours are locally invasive soft tissue tumours in which beta-catenin mediated TCF-dependent transcription is activated. The role of soluble factors secreted by the myofibroblastic desmoid tumour, which could stimulate tumour invasiveness, was investigated. Using collagen gel invasion assays, the presence of factors stimulating invasion in desmoid conditioned media (CM) could be established. Since matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in the process of tumoral invasion, the expression levels of the MMP family members were evaluated. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to determine the expression levels of MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, MMP7, MMP11, MMP12, MMP13, MMP14 and the inhibitors TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3. Besides overexpression of MMP7, a known TCF-dependent target gene, a striking upregulation of the expression levels of MMP1, MMP3, MMP11, MMP12 and MMP13 in desmoid tumours, compared to unaffected fibroblasts from the same patients, was found. Treating the CM of desmoids with a synthetic and a physiologic MMP inhibitor reduced the invasion-stimulating capacity of the desmoid CM by approximately 50%. These results suggest the involvement of soluble factors, released by the desmoid cells, in stimulating invasion and implicate the MMPs as facilitators of invasion. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferent mechanisms are implicated in ERBB2 gene overexpression in breast and in other cancers
Vernimmen, D.; Guéders, Maud ULg; Pisvin, Sonia ULg et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2003), 89(5), 899-906

The ERBB2 gene is overexpressed in 30% of breast cancers and this has been correlated with poor prognosis. ERBB2 is upregulated in other cancers such as prostate, pancreas, colon and ovary. In breast ... [more ▼]

The ERBB2 gene is overexpressed in 30% of breast cancers and this has been correlated with poor prognosis. ERBB2 is upregulated in other cancers such as prostate, pancreas, colon and ovary. In breast cancer cells, the mechanisms leading to ERBB2 gene overexpression are increased transcription and gene amplification. In these cancers, AP-2 transcription factors are involved in ERBB2 overexpression, and AP-2 levels are correlated with p185(c-erbB-2) levels. In this work, we wanted to know if the same molecular mechanisms are responsible for the ERBB2 upregulation in non-breast cancers. We compared ERBB2 gene copy number, p185(c-erbB-2) and mRNA levels with AP-2 levels in several ovary, prostate, colon and pancreas cancer cells. A moderate expression of erbB-2 mRNA and protein were observed in some cells without gene amplification. In contrast to breast cancer cells, AP-2 factors were absent or low in some non-breast cells which did express ERBB2. It is thus likely that AP-2 is not a major player in the increased levels of erbB-2 transcripts in non-breast cancer cells. The transcriptional activity of the ERBB2 promoter in colon and ovary cancer cells was estimated using reporter vectors. The results showed that the promoter regions involved in ERBB2 gene overexpression in breast cancer cells are different from those that lead to the gene upregulation in colon and ovary cancers. In conclusion, our results indicate that different transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are responsible for the increased levels of erbB-2 transcript and protein in breast and non-breast cancer cells. [less ▲]

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See detail3-Bromophenyl 6-acetoxymethyl-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran-3-carboxylate inhibits cancer cell invasion in vitro and tumour growth in vivo
Kempen, I.; Papapostolou, D.; Thierry, N. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2003), 88(7), 1111-1118

In search for new anticancer agents, we have evaluated the antiinvasive and antimigrative properties of recently developed synthetic coumarin derivatives among which two compounds revealed important ... [more ▼]

In search for new anticancer agents, we have evaluated the antiinvasive and antimigrative properties of recently developed synthetic coumarin derivatives among which two compounds revealed important activity: 3-chlorophenyl 6-acetoxymethyl-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran-3-carboxylate and 3-bromophenyl 6-acetoxymethyl-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran-3-carboxylate, Both drugs were able to inhibit cell invasion markedly in a Boyden chamber assay, the bromo derivative being more potent than the reference matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GI 129471. In vivo, tumour growth was reduced when nude mice grafted with HT 1080 or MDA-MB231 cells were treated i.p. 3 days week(-1) with the bromo coumarin derivative. These effects were not associated with the inhibition of urokinase, plasmin, MMP-2 or MMP-9. The mechanism of action of the drugs remains to be elucidated. However, these two coumarin derivatives may serve as new lead compounds of an original class of antitumour agents. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of medical specialist' locus of control on communication skills in oncological interviews
Libert, Y.; Janne, P.; Razavi, D. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2003), 88

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See detailIncidence and survival rate of women with cervical cancer in the Greater Amsterdam area.
BULK, Saskia ULg; Visser, O.; Rozendaal, L. et al

in British journal of cancer (2003), 89(5), 834-9

To evaluate the effect of population-based cervical cancer screening on the occurrence of cervical cancer in The Netherlands, we investigated the incidence and survival of cervical cancer registered by a ... [more ▼]

To evaluate the effect of population-based cervical cancer screening on the occurrence of cervical cancer in The Netherlands, we investigated the incidence and survival of cervical cancer registered by a cancer registry in the Greater Amsterdam area. The incidence rate of squamous cell carcinoma decreased significantly from 9.2/100,000 women in 1988 to 5.9/100,000 in 2000 (P<0.001). The incidence rate of adenocarcinomas remained stable. After adjustment for age, stage and lymph node involvement, the relative risk of death was 1.6 times higher for patients with adenocarcinomas than for patients with squamous cell carcinoma (95% CI 1.2-2.1). The decreased survival was related to histological type, as the effect remained significant after correction for confounding factors. Over time, the prognosis of women with squamous cell carcinoma improved significantly. No significant change was observed for women diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that the screening programme in The Netherlands as executed in the Greater Amsterdam area is associated with a decreased incidence and increased survival of patients with squamous cell carcinoma, but fails to detect (pre)malignant lesions of adenocarcinoma. Since more than 92% of adenocarcinomas and its precursors contain high-risk HPV, adding HPV testing to cytologic screening might improve the present screening programme in detecting adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailMurine 5T multiple myeloma cells induce angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo
Van Valckenborgh, E.; De Raeve, H.; Devy, L. et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2002), 86(5), 796-802

Multiple myeloma is a B cell malignancy. Recently, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow samples of patients with multiple myeloma display an enhanced angiogenesis. The mechanisms involved seem to be ... [more ▼]

Multiple myeloma is a B cell malignancy. Recently, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow samples of patients with multiple myeloma display an enhanced angiogenesis. The mechanisms involved seem to be multiple and complex. We here demonstrate that the murine 5T multiple myeloma models are able to induce angiogenesis in vitro by using a rat aortic ring assay and in vivo by determining the microvessel density. The rat aortic rings cultured in 5T multiple myeloma conditioned medium exhibit a higher number of longer and more branched microvessels than the rings cultured in control medium. In bone marrow samples from 5T multiple myeloma diseased mice, a statistically significant increase of the microvessel density was observed when compared to bone marrow samples from age-matched controls. The angiogenic phenotype of both 5T multiple myeloma cells could be related, at least in part, to their capacity to produce vascular endothelial growth factor. These data clearly demonstrate that the 5T multiple myeloma models are good models to study angiogenesis in multiple myeloma and will allow to unravel the mechanisms of neovascularisation, as well as to test new putative inhibitors of angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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