References of "Brain, Behavior & Evolution"
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See detailSpecies Differences in the Relative Densities of D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in the Japanese Quail and Rats: An in vitro Quantitative Receptor Autoradiography Study.
Kleitz, H. K.; Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in Brain, Behavior & Evolution (2009), 73(2), 81-90

Evidence has accumulated that the regulation of male sexual behavior by dopamine might not be the same in Japanese quail (and perhaps all birds) as it is in mammals. For example, the non-selective ... [more ▼]

Evidence has accumulated that the regulation of male sexual behavior by dopamine might not be the same in Japanese quail (and perhaps all birds) as it is in mammals. For example, the non-selective dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine (APO), facilitates male sexual behavior in rats but inhibits it in quail. Although the general organization of the dopamine system is similar in birds and mammals, it is possible that the relative distribution and/or density of binding sites are different. We therefore compared the relative densities of D1-like and D2-like receptor subtypes in Japanese quail and rats, with the use of in vitro quantitative receptor autoradiography. Brain sections from 8 male rats and 8 male quail were labeled with [(3)H]SCH-23390 and [(3)H]Spiperone. In general we found a systematic species difference in the relative density of D1- vs. D2-like receptors such that the D2/D1 ratio is higher in quail than in rats in areas, known to be important target sites for dopamine action such as striatal regions or the preoptic area, which is also associated with activation of sexual behavior. This difference might explain the variation in the behavioral effectiveness of APO in rats as compared to quail; with a higher relative density of D2-like receptors in quail, a similar dose of APO would be more likely to activate inhibitory processes in quail than in rats. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative aspects of the spatial distribution and morphological characteristics of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.; Teleostei, Serranidae) trunk lateral line neuromasts.
Faucher, Karine ULg; Lagardère, Jean-Paul; Aubert, Anne

in Brain, Behavior & Evolution (2005), 65(4), 231-43

The results presented herein report quantitative data relative to the distribution and morphological characteristics of both types of neuromasts encountered on the trunk lateral line of the sea bass ... [more ▼]

The results presented herein report quantitative data relative to the distribution and morphological characteristics of both types of neuromasts encountered on the trunk lateral line of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.). These data were obtained from scanning electron micrographs. They indicate that, as expected, each modified scale of the sea bass possessed a single canal neuromast with long axis oriented parallel to the fish's long axis. In contrast to several fish species, two thirds of superficial neuromasts observed herein were oriented perpendicular to the fish's long axis. However, whatever the main orientation of superficial neuromasts, two thirds of their hair bundles were oriented parallel to the long axis of the animal with approximately half of them in the direction of the head. Similar ratios were observed for canal neuromasts whatever the area of the maculae: central or peripheral. For both types of neuromasts it was not possible to clearly distinguish a paired organization of hair bundles with opposing polarities. Superficial neuromasts on each trunk canal scale were located on either the dorsal or ventral side of the canal and appeared to be distributed along the trunk lateral line with a higher probability to be encountered closer to the operculum. The frequency of presence and the average number of superficial neuromasts per scale increased with fish size. We observed a size gradient for canal neuromasts between the operculum and caudal peduncle. This gradation was correlated with a reduction of the width of the central area of the canal segment. Canal neuromasts were always localized in the larger portions of the canal segments. Taken together, these results point out some specific features associated with the sea bass trunk lateral line. With the previous report, they establish the first full description of the trunk lateral line of sea bass and will be useful for upcoming experiments regarding the function of the two types of neuromasts. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial distribution and morphological characteristics of the trunk lateral line neuromasts of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.; Teleostei, Serranidae).
Faucher, Karine ULg; Aubert, Anne; Lagardère, Jean-Paul

in Brain, Behavior & Evolution (2003), 62(4), 223-32

The morphology and spatial distribution of the different types of neuromasts encountered on the trunk lateral line of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were examined using scanning electron microscopy ... [more ▼]

The morphology and spatial distribution of the different types of neuromasts encountered on the trunk lateral line of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The sea bass trunk lateral line exhibits a complete straight pattern. In their basic features, the two types of neuromasts present, canal and superficial, resemble what has been described in other fishes. They are similar in their general cellular organization but differ in sizes, and shapes, as well as in the densities and lengths of their hair bundles. However, the sea bass trunk lateral line distinguishes itself in several ways. For instance, the pores of the canal segments are partially obstructed due to the overlap of scales throughout the trunk. Moreover, based on the density and length of the hair bundles, two distinct areas, central and peripheral, could be distinguished within the maculae of canal neuromasts. Their cupulae are also peculiar as they possess two wing-like extensions and that their central core appears to be organized in layers instead of columns. In addition, the superficial neuromasts, up to 6 per scale, are either round or elliptical and seem to be distributed serendipitously. Finally, within the maculae of both types of neuromasts, a significant number of hair bundles do not follow the two-directional polarity pattern usually described. Although some hypotheses are proposed, the influence of these characteristics in terms of signal encoding and fish behavior is yet to be understood. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of lesions of nucleus taeniae on appetitive and consummatory aspects of male sexual behavior in Japanese quail
Absil, Philippe ULg; Braquenier, Jean-Baptiste ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in Brain, Behavior & Evolution (2002), 60(1), 13-35

Neurochemical, hodological and functional criteria suggest that the nucleus taeniae and parts of the adjacent archistriatum represent the avian homologue of parts of the mammalian amygdaloid complex. It ... [more ▼]

Neurochemical, hodological and functional criteria suggest that the nucleus taeniae and parts of the adjacent archistriatum represent the avian homologue of parts of the mammalian amygdaloid complex. It has been proposed in particular that the nucleus taeniae is the homologue of the mammalian medial amygdala. In male quail, relatively large lesions to the posterior/medial archistriatum selectively decrease the expression of appetitive sexual behavior in a manner reminiscent of similar manipulations involving the medial amygdala in mammals. We investigated the effects of discrete lesions restricted to nucleus taeniae and of lesions to an adjacent part of the archistriaturn (pars intermedium ventralis, Alv) on the expression of appetitive (ASB) and consummatory (CSB) aspects of male sexual behavior. ASB was measured by a learned social proximity response (after copulation a male quail stands in front of a window providing visual access to a female) and by the frequency of rhythmic cloacal sphincter movements. CSB was assessed by the frequency of mount attempts (MA) and cloacal contact movements (CCM). Lesions confined to nucleus taeniae and to Alv did not influence the acquisition or the maintenance of the two responses indicative of ASB. In contrast, lesions of nucleus taeniae significantly increased the occurrence frequencies of MA and CCM when administered before the beginning of behavior testing and increased the frequency of MA only when performed on sexually experienced subjects. No effect of Alv lesions could be detected. The discrepancy between these results and previous experiments in quail might reflect procedural differences, but more probably differences in locations of the lesions that were restricted in the current study to the anterior part of taeniae. Those in the Thompson study were in the posterior part of this nucleus. These findings indicate that there is a larger degree of functional heterogeneity in the nucleus taeniae than previously thought. The effects of taeniae lesions suggest that this nucleus, similar to the medial amygdala in mammals, might be implicated in the control of sexual satiety. Copyright (C) 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailSteroid sensitive sites in the avian brain: does the distribution of the estrogen receptor alpha and beta types provide insight into their function?
Ball, G. F.; Bernard, D. J.; Foidart, Agnès ULg et al

in Brain, Behavior & Evolution (1999), 54

Studies in avian species have often been useful in elucidating basic concepts relevant to the regulation of reproductive behaviors by sex steroid hormones. Once a link between a steroid hormone and a ... [more ▼]

Studies in avian species have often been useful in elucidating basic concepts relevant to the regulation of reproductive behaviors by sex steroid hormones. Once a link between a steroid hormone and a behavioral response has been established, one can use the localization of steroid hormone receptors in the brain to facilitate the identification of neural circuits that control behavior. The recent identification of a second type of estrogen receptor called estrogen receptor beta or ERbeta has raised new issues about the action of steroid hormones in the brain. A hypothesis has been proposed by Kuiper et al. [1998] based on studies in mammalian species suggesting that ERalpha (the name given to the ER that was previously described) is important for reproduction while ERbeta is more important for non-reproductive functions. In this paper we apply this hypothesis more generally by examining possible functions of ERbeta in avian species. We have initiated studies of the ERbeta in the brain of two avian species, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). ERbeta was cloned in both species and the mRNA for this receptor type was localized in the brain employing in situ hybridization histochemistry methods. In both species ERbeta was found to be diffusely present in telencephalic areas consistent with a role for this receptor subtype in cognitive functions. However, ERbeta mRNA was also found in many brain areas that are traditionally thought to be important in the regulation of reproductive functions such as the preoptic region, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the nucleus taeniae. Of the two receptor types, only mRNA for ERalpha was observed in the telencephalic vocal control nucleus HVc of male starlings. Steroid receptors in this nucleus are thought to be an example of an evolutionary specialization that has evolved to coordinate the production of courtship vocalizations with other aspects of reproduction. The lack of ERbeta mRNA expression in HVc is consistent with the hypothesis that ERalpha is preferentially involved in reproductive behaviors while ERbeta is involved in the steroid regulation of other neural functions. However, the widespread occurrence of ERbeta in other nuclei involved in reproductive function suggests that one must be cautious about the general applicability of the above hypothesis until more is known about ERbeta function in these other nuclei [less ▲]

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