References of "Biology of the Neonate"
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See detailadaptation in neonatalogy of the once-daily concept of aminoglycoside administration: evaluation of a dosing chart for amikacin in an intensive care unit.
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Langhendries, J. P.; Bertrand, J. M. et al

in Biology of the Neonate (1998), 74

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See detailThe production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in neonates assessed by stimulated whole cord blood culture and by plasma levels at birth.
SEGHAYE, Marie-Christine ULg; Heyl, W.; Grabitz, R. G. et al

in Biology of the Neonate (1998), 73(4), 220-7

The capability of neonates to achieve cytokine balance was evaluated. Production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF alpha and IL-8, of the natural anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10 and of the regulator ... [more ▼]

The capability of neonates to achieve cytokine balance was evaluated. Production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF alpha and IL-8, of the natural anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10 and of the regulator of the acute phase response IL6 was assessed after whole blood stimulation by lipopolysaccharide in cord blood (n = 10), adult volunteers serving as control (n = 17). Additionally, circulating cytokines were determined in cord and in maternal blood immediately after delivery (n = 27, respectively). Significant production of TNF alpha, IL8, IL10 and IL6 was observed in cord blood after lipopolysaccharide stimulation and was similar to cytokine production in adult blood. The plasma concentrations of TNF alpha were significantly higher in cord than in maternal blood, while plasma concentrations of IL10 and IL6 were significantly lower. Our results demonstrate fully developed capability of whole cord blood to synthesize pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to a pro-inflammatory stimulation in vitro. In vivo, however, higher circulating TNF alpha and lower IL10 and IL6 levels in cord blood suggest that the inflammatory stress associated with normal delivery does not induce detectable anti-inflammatory response in neonates at birth. [less ▲]

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See detailPhosphorus intake in preterm babies and variation of tubular reabsorption for phosphate per liter glomerular filtrate
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Langhendries, J. P.; François, A. et al

in Biology of the Neonate (1992), 61

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See detailValidity of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) determination in assessing netilmicin nephrotoxicity in preterm babies
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Langhendries, J. P.; Mattot, M. et al

in Biology of the Neonate (1989), 56

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See detailAminoglycoside nephrotoxicity and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Langhendries, J. P.; Bertrand, J. M.

in Biology of the Neonate (1988), 53

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See detailSignificance of Plasma Amino Acid Pattern in Preterm Infants
Rigo, Jacques ULg; Senterre, Jacques ULg

in Biology of the Neonate (1987), 52(Suppl 1), 41-9

Nutritional studies frequently take into consideration plasma amino acid concentrations in order to evaluate the adequacy of protein intake in preterm infants. From our data of more than 100 ... [more ▼]

Nutritional studies frequently take into consideration plasma amino acid concentrations in order to evaluate the adequacy of protein intake in preterm infants. From our data of more than 100 determinations of plasma amino acid concentrations in preterm infants, we review the factors influencing the aminogram. Method and moment of sampling, protein intake and composition, protein turnover rate, energy supply, and gestational age, all may influence plasma amino acid concentrations. It is suggested that the cord blood amino acid concentration may be considered as an appropriate value of reference and a safe level for growing preterm infants. [less ▲]

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