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See detailEffects of information and 50 Hz magnetic fields on cognitive performance and reported symptoms
Nevelsteen, Sophie ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Crasson, Marion ULg

in Bioelectromagnetics (2007), 28(1), 53-63

The aim of this study was to explore the role of expectancies and beliefs about the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) (what the subject thought the effect was going to be) and the effects ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to explore the role of expectancies and beliefs about the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) (what the subject thought the effect was going to be) and the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields (400 microT(rms)) acute exposure on cognitive performance, the reporting of physical symptoms and some psychological and physiological parameters. Seventy-four healthy male volunteers aged between 40 and 60 years of age were randomly assigned to one of five groups, which differed in (1) the type of information they were given concerning the expected magnetic field effect on performance in cognitive tests (positive = enhancement of the performance; negative = impairment of the performance; neutral) and (2) the type of exposure (real or sham). Three groups were sham exposed with positive (group+), negative (group-) and neutral information (group+/-); one group was really exposed with neutral information (group expo) and one group was not exposed, though they wore the helmet, and did not receive any field-related information (control group). All the volunteers, except the control group, were led to believe that they would be exposed to a magnetic field of 400 microT(rms). The experimental design respected a double blind procedure and the experimental session involved three steps (pre-testing, exposure, and post-testing). Various measurements were taken, including cognitive performance, psychological parameters such as mood, vigilance, and reporting of symptoms. Physiological parameters such as blood pressure and pulse rate were also recorded. The information given did not significantly modify beliefs. No significant difference was found among the five groups depending on the type of information and the type of exposure in cognitive performance, psychological and physiological parameters. In the context of the study, with our population, the type of information given failed to induce expected changes in parameters measured. Our results do not support the hypothesis that an acute exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (50 Hz, 400 microT(rms)) affects the parameters measured. [less ▲]

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See detailAbsence of daytime 50 Hz, 100 mu T-rms magnetic field or bright light exposure effect on human performance and psychophysiological parameters
Crasson, Marion ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg

in Bioelectromagnetics (2005), 26(3), 225-233

The purpose of this study was to reproduce and extend two earlier studies of the effects of human exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF). In a recent paper, we described results of two double-blind ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to reproduce and extend two earlier studies of the effects of human exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF). In a recent paper, we described results of two double-blind investigations performed to examine effects of 100 mu T-rms 50 Hz MF exposure on psychological parameters in the same group of healthy human volunteers. In each exposure session, at 1 week intervals, with sham, continuous, and intermittent (15 s ON/OFF cycles) MF conditions, mood ratings, performance measures, and electrophysiological measures were taken. In the first study, significant amplitude changes were observed in the event-related brain potentials (ERP) recorded during a dichotic listening task. In the second study, latency and reaction time (RT) slowing were seen on a visual discrimination task (P-300 paradigm). Although these results were little related to the number of parameters analysed, they indicate that low level 50 Hz MF might have a slight influence on ERP and RT under specific circumstances of sustained attention. Before concluding that moderately strong MF exposure can influence cognitive function, previous results should be replicated, using the same paradigms with another group of healthy volunteers. In the present study, 18 healthy subjects were exposed to three experimental sessions of 30 min each, given at 1 week intervals. The sessions consisted of continuous 100 mu T-rms 50 Hz MF exposure, sham condition, and bright light (5000 lux) exposure. The study was performed double-blind, with the exposure order counter-balanced. The data on mood, ERP, RT, and other performance measures did not show any differences among the sham exposure, light exposure, and MF exposure conditions. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that extremely low frequency (ELF) MF exposure affects the brain's electrical activity or cognitive function at field strength (100 mu T-rms) similar to that found in very close proximity of some household and industrial electrical appliances and well in excess of the average MF strength (c. 0.1 mu T) found in homes. The sensitivity of the experiment was possibly not sufficient to detect an effect at this relatively low MF, and larger sample sizes would be required in further studies. Bioelectromagnetics 26:225-233, 2005. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailNo influence of 20 and 400 mu T 50 Hz magnetic field exposure on cognitive function in humans
Delhez, Marie; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Crasson, Marion ULg

in Bioelectromagnetics (2004), 25(8), 592-598

The aim of the present study was to investigate cognitive effects of a continuous, vertical extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) of 20 and 400 muT 50 Hz in healthy young men during ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to investigate cognitive effects of a continuous, vertical extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) of 20 and 400 muT 50 Hz in healthy young men during performance on cognitive tests. Thirty-two volunteers (20-30 years old, mean 22.6 +/- 2.2 years) participated in this double blind study. The test protocol consisted of a set of tests: divided attention, flexibility, memory updating, digit span, digit span with articulary suppression, and time perception. The total duration of the exposure was 65 min. Participants were assigned four sessions: three conditions in the helmet (sham exposure, 20 and 400 muT) and one condition out of the helmet (to control the expectancy effect). No effect of MF exposure was observed on performance. Bioelectromagnetics 25:592-598, 2004. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of intermittent and continuous exposure to electromagnetic fields on cultured hippocampal cells
Boland, André ULg; Gabriel, Danielle ULg; Breeur, Danielle ULg et al

in Bioelectromagnetics (2002), 23(2), 97-105

This study was designed to assess the effect of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on hippocampal cell cultures in the presence or absence of either sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) or Fe2+ induced ... [more ▼]

This study was designed to assess the effect of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on hippocampal cell cultures in the presence or absence of either sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) or Fe2+ induced oxidative stress. One week old cultured rat hippocampal cells were exposed to either intermittent EMFs (IEMFs, 50 Hz, 0-5 mT, 1 min ON/OFF cycles, repeated 10 times every 2 h, 6 times/day during 48 h) or continuous EMFs (CEMFs, 50 Hz, 0-5 mT for 48 h). In a second set of experiments, the effect on such EMFs applied in combination with oxidative stress induced by 0.5 microM Fe2+ or SNP was estimated. At the end of both sets of experiments, cell mortality was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase measurements (LDH). Neither type of exposure to EMFs was observed to modify the basal rate of cell mortality. The exposure to CEMFs in presence of either NO or Fe2+ did not induce any significant increase in cell death. However, when cells were exposed to EMFs in the presence of NO, we observed a significant increase in cell death of 11 and 23% (P<0.001) at 2.5 and 5 mT, respectively. This effect had some specificity because IEMFs did not modify the effect of Fe2+ on cell mortality. Although the effects of IEMFs reported in this study were only observed at very high intensities, our model may prove valuable in trying to identify one cellular target of EMFs. [less ▲]

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See detail50 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure Influence on Human Performance and Psychophysiological Parameters: Two Double-Blind Experimental Studies
Crasson, Marion ULg; Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Legros, Willy ULg et al

in Bioelectromagnetics (1999), 20(8), 474-86

Two double-blind studies were performed to examine magnetic field (MF) exposure effects and to determine the impact of temporal variation (continuous vs. intermittent exposure) of 100 mu T(rms) 50 Hz MF ... [more ▼]

Two double-blind studies were performed to examine magnetic field (MF) exposure effects and to determine the impact of temporal variation (continuous vs. intermittent exposure) of 100 mu T(rms) 50 Hz MF diurnal exposure on psychological and psychophysiological parameters in healthy humans. Three cephalic exposure sessions of 30-min, i.e., sham, continuous, and intermittent (15 s ON/OFF cycles) MF conditions, were involved. Each subject participated in all sessions, which were spaced at 1-wk intervals. In each session, mood ratings and performance measures were obtained before, during, or after exposure and several electrophysiological data (event-related brain potentials [ERP]) were recorded after each exposure session. These criteria were chosen to evaluate sensory functions as well as automatic and voluntary attentional processes. In experiment 1, 21 healthy male volunteers (20 to 27 years of age) were studied. Ten subjects were exposed at 13:30 h, and 11 subjects were exposed at 16:30 h. Statistically significant changes in the amplitude of ERP were observed after MF exposure in the dichotic listening task, indexing selective attention processes. Eighteen of the 21 original male volunteers took part in experiment 2, undertaken to better understand the results related to information processing involved in selective attention and control for ultradian rhythmicity. Exposure time for all the subjects was at 13:30 h. The analysis of the data again revealed significant amplitude changes of the ERP recorded in the dichotic listening task. Moreover, they demonstrated ERP latency and reaction time slowing in the oddball paradigm, a visual discrimination task after real MF exposure. These results also indicate that a low level 50 Hz MF may have a slight influence on event-related potentials and reaction time under specific circumstances of sustained attention. [less ▲]

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