References of "Biodiversity & Conservation"
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See detailNewt decline in Western Europe: highlights from relative distribution changes within guilds
Denoël, Mathieu ULg

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2012), 21(11), 2887-2898

The recent increase in the number of monitoring schemes has formed the basis for high quality distribution atlases. This provides the opportunity of estimating global and specific decline patterns across ... [more ▼]

The recent increase in the number of monitoring schemes has formed the basis for high quality distribution atlases. This provides the opportunity of estimating global and specific decline patterns across regional and national borders. In this framework, this study focused on four sympatric newt species—including the great crested newt (Triturus cristatus), an Annex 2 European Habitats Directive species, over six geographic areas (five countries) in Western Europe. A relative comparison of distribution maps across time is used here and is based on more than twelve thousands occupied grid cells. It benefits from the definition of a guild, as these species are simultaneously detectable in wetlands. T. cristatus and the alpine newt (Mesotriton alpestris) were the most and the least threatened newt species, respectively, whereas the palmate (Lissotriton helveticus) and smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) had an intermediate decline level at both coarse and fine grain resolutions. However, regional variations across Europe and scale effects were also found. On one hand, these results show that T. cristatus is not only regionally threatened but suffers from a global decline in Western Europe. On another hand, the results indicate that patterns of decline are not uniform within Europe and that species often considered as common and not threatened are, in fact, declining more than others. Finally, the proposed methodology, i.e. using guilds to assess relative decline, would be useful as a complement to other standardized methods in correctly advising conservation managers and policy makers, particularly for species with more subtle declines. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards the use of ecological heterogeneity to design reserve networks: A case study from Dadia National Park, Greece
Kati, V.; Poirazidis, K.; Dufrêne, Marc ULg et al

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2010), 19(6), 1585-1597

In this paper, we present a novel approach for using ecological heterogeneity in reserve design. We measured five ecological heterogeneity indices (EHI) and we used a database of six biological groups ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present a novel approach for using ecological heterogeneity in reserve design. We measured five ecological heterogeneity indices (EHI) and we used a database of six biological groups (woody plants, orchids, orthopterans, aquatic and terrestrial herpetofauna and passerine birds) across 30 sites in a Mediterranean reserve (Greece). We found that all the five EHI were significantly related to the overall species richness and to the species richness of woody plants and birds. Two indices, measuring vertical vegetation complexity (1/D) and horizontal heterogeneity of landcover types (SIDI) in terms of Simpson's index, predicted well overall species richness and had significantly higher values inside the complementary reserve networks designed after five of the six biological groups. We compared five methods of forming reserve networks. The method of ecological heterogeneity (selecting those sites with the greatest 1/D and then SIDI) was less efficient (non-significantly) than the species-based methods (scoring and complementary networks) but significantly more efficient than the random method (randomly selected network). We also found that the method of complementary ecological heterogeneity (selecting those sites where each EHI had its maximum value) was not that efficient, as it did not differ significantly from the random method. These results underline the potential of the ecological heterogeneity method as an alternative tool in reserve design. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial avoidance of invading pastoral cattle by wild ungulates: insights from using point process statistics
Hibert, Fabrice; Calenge, Clément; Hervé, Fritz et al

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2010)

Traditional rangelands in many developing countries are currently being encroached by cultivation, driving some herders to illegally use protected areas for grazing their cattle. Since cattle are an ... [more ▼]

Traditional rangelands in many developing countries are currently being encroached by cultivation, driving some herders to illegally use protected areas for grazing their cattle. Since cattle are an exotic species in these ecosystems, they might have an impact on the local wild herbivore communities, notably through competition. We used point pattern statistics to characterise the spatial relationships between wild ungulate species and cattle herds within a protected area in west Africa undergoing seasonal intrusions by cattle. We predicted that the wild ungulate species that are ecologically and morphologically similar to cattle, in terms of body mass and diet, would be more sensitive to grass depletion by cattle and would be separated from cattle to a larger extent. The spatial distribution of browsing and mixed-feeding antelopes did not seem to be affected much by cattle presence, whereas most grazing species showed spatial separation from cattle. Interestingly, elephants also showed significant separation from cattle herds. We discuss the likely processes that may have contributed to the observed spatial patterns. Thespatial displacement of certain wild species, including megaherbivores, affects the whole community structure and, thus, other components of the ecosystem. [less ▲]

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See detailCommunity hunting in logging concessions: towards a management model for Cameroon’s dense forests
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Julve Larrubia, C.; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2009), 18(10), 2705-2718

In central Africa, commercial poaching and local village hunting are still two major issues that logging companies must address through the implementation of effective management plans in order to certify ... [more ▼]

In central Africa, commercial poaching and local village hunting are still two major issues that logging companies must address through the implementation of effective management plans in order to certify their concessions. However, current problems in developing suitable hunting management schemes for dense tropical forests arise from (1) the difficulty associated with setting quotas which take into account indiscriminate local hunting practices (e.g. snare trapping) and the ill-defined modes of resource appropriation by local populations, (2) the difficulty associated with evaluating the effect of illegal hunting, i.e. poaching, and (3) the relative complexity of the main available model. To overcome this, we propose to develop alternative management models where village hunting is planned along the same lines as existing logging operation models, through the implementation of a system of spatio-temporal rotation of hunting areas. In practice, the logging concession, initially divided into annual logging areas, is divided into similar annual hunting areas (AHAs), which are opened to hunting during the year preceding the logging operations. A depletion of the wildlife stock is expected within the annually opened hunting areas, but the model assumes a progressive re-colonization of the depleted AHA in subsequent years from neighbouring ones. In this paper, an empirical model of such a controlled hunting system employing spatio-temporal rotation of hunting areas is tested within a Forestry Management Unit (FMU) covering 47,585 ha in the Dja region, in south-east Cameroon. The model, based on large forest areas, seems particularly well adapted to Cameroon’s dense forests because it fits within the existing legal framework of Community-Managed Zones of Hunting Interest (CMZHI) and is aligned with current logging concession operations. Preliminary results suggest that sustainable hunting can be achieved in the FMU, provided a management scheme of AHAs is strictly enforced through effective stakeholder commitment. [less ▲]

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See detailLandscape Dynamics And Habitat Selection By The Alien Invasive Fallopia (Polygonaceae) In Belgium
Tiebre, Marie-Solange; Saad, Layla ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2008), 17(10), 2357-2370

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See detailA GIS-based model of the distribution of the rare liverwort Aneura maxima at the landscape scale for an improved assessment of its conservation status
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Sotiaux, André ULg; Engels, Patrick ULg

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2006), 15(3), 829-838

Testing whether rare species are limited by narrow habitat conditions from correlations between species occurrence and measured environmental factors is usually hampered by the lack of statistical power ... [more ▼]

Testing whether rare species are limited by narrow habitat conditions from correlations between species occurrence and measured environmental factors is usually hampered by the lack of statistical power associated to the low number of observations. Aneura maxima is an exceedingly rare liverwort in Europe whose recent discovery precluded the inclusion within the Red Data Book of European bryophytes. A series of new observations resulting from intensive bryophyte grid-mapping at the border between France and Belgium allowed the statistical investigation of the factors accounting for its distribution at the landscape scale. The species was systematically observed in deep ravines on damp, loamy soils under light tree cover within broadleaf woodlands. These conditions differ from those of other European localities, suggesting that A. maxima is not limited by a narrow ecological range. Attempting to predict the occurrence of A. maxima at the landscape scale from data on land use and soil conditions resulted in a model where the species was actually observed in only a half of the squares where its probability of occurrence was the highest. The species thus does not seem to have colonized all its potential habitats, which may be explained by the poor dispersal ability of this dioecious, rarely fertile species. Given the relative frequency of A. maxima in the Semois river basin, but taking into account its seemingly low dispersal ability and its preference for swampy habitats that are threatened by draining and spruce plantations, a status as 'conservation dependent' to 'near threatened' within the category 'lower risk' is proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailPatterns Of Bryophyte Diversity And Rarity At A Regional Scale
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Engels, Patrick ULg

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2003), 12(3),

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