References of "Behavioural Brain Research"
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See detailAmphetamine reward in food restricted mice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1
Geuzaine, A; Tyhon, A; Grisar, Thierry ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2014), 262

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See detailLight modulation of human sleep depends on a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Viola, Antoine; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2014), 271

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See detailInitial uncertainty in Pavlovian reward prediction persistently elevates incentive salience and extends sign-tracking to normally unattractive cues
Robinson, Mike J.F.; Anselme, Patrick ULg; Fischer, Adam M. et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2014), 266(1), 119-130

Uncertainty is a component of many gambling games and may play a role in incentive motivation and cue attraction. Uncertainty can increase the attractiveness for predictors of reward in the Pavlovian ... [more ▼]

Uncertainty is a component of many gambling games and may play a role in incentive motivation and cue attraction. Uncertainty can increase the attractiveness for predictors of reward in the Pavlovian procedure of autoshaping, visible as enhanced sign-tracking (or approach and nibbles) by rats of a metal lever whose sudden appearance acts as a conditioned stimulus (CS+) to predict sucrose pellets as an unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Here we examined how reward uncertainty might enhance incentive salience as sign-tracking both in intensity and by broadening the range of attractive CS+s. We also examined whether initially-induced uncertainty enhancements of CS+ attraction can endure beyond uncertainty itself, and persist even when Pavlovian prediction becomes 100% certain. Our results show that uncertainty can broaden incentive salience attribution to make CS cues attractive that would otherwise not be (either because they are too distal from reward or too risky to normally attract sign-tracking). In addition, uncertainty enhancement of CS+ incentive salience, once induced by initial exposure, persisted even when Pavlovian CS-UCS correlations later rose toward 100% certainty in prediction. Persistence suggests an enduring incentive motivation enhancement potentially relevant to gambling, which in some ways resembles incentive-sensitization. Higher motivation to uncertain CS+s leads to more potent attraction to these cues when they predict the delivery of uncertain rewards. In humans, those cues might possibly include the sights and sounds associated with gambling, which contribute a major component of the play immersion experienced by problematic gamblers. [less ▲]

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See detailLight modulation of human sleep depends on a polymorphism in the clock gene Period3.
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Viola, Antoine U.; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Behavioural brain research (2014), 271

Non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light powerfully modulate human physiology. However, it remains scarcely understood how NIF responses to light modulate human sleep and its EEG hallmarks, and if there ... [more ▼]

Non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light powerfully modulate human physiology. However, it remains scarcely understood how NIF responses to light modulate human sleep and its EEG hallmarks, and if there are differences across individuals. Here we investigated NIF responses to light on sleep in individuals genotyped for the PERIOD3 (PER3) variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism. Eighteen healthy young men (20-28 years; mean+/-SEM: 25.9+/-1.2) homozygous for the PER3 polymorphism were matched by age, body-mass index, and ethnicity. The study protocol comprised a balanced cross-over design during the winter, during which participants were exposed to either light of 40lx at 6500K (blue-enriched) or light at 2500K (non-blue enriched), during 2h in the evening. Compared to light at 2500K, light at 6500K induced a significant increase in all-night NREM sleep slow-wave activity (SWA: 1.0-4.5Hz) in the occipital cortex for PER3(5/5) individuals, but not for PER3(4/4) volunteers. Dynamics of SWA across sleep cycles revealed increased occipital NREM sleep SWA for virtuallyall sleep episode only for PER3(5/5) individuals. Furthermore, they experienced light at 6500K as significantly brighter. Intriguingly, this subjective perception of brightness significantly predicted their increased occipital SWA throughout the sleep episode. Our data indicate that humans homozygous for the PER3(5/5) allele are more sensitive to NIF light effects, as indexed by specific changes in sleep EEG activity. Ultimately, individual differences in NIF light responses on sleep may depend on a clock gene polymorphism involved in sleep-wake regulation. [less ▲]

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See detailThe histamine H3-receptor inverse agonist Pitolisant improves fear memory in mice
Brabant, Christian ULg; Charlier, Yana ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 243

Numerous studies have demonstrated that brain histamine plays a crucial role in learning and memory and histamine H3 receptor inverse agonists (H3R inverse agonists) have been proposed to treat cognitive ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies have demonstrated that brain histamine plays a crucial role in learning and memory and histamine H3 receptor inverse agonists (H3R inverse agonists) have been proposed to treat cognitive disorders. Pitolisant (BF2.649, 1-{3-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy]propyl}piperidine, hydrochloride) was the first H3R inverse agonist that has been tested in human trials and is well tolerated. The present study investigated whether Pitolisant (0.625–20 mg/kg, i.p.) improves consolidation and reconsolidation processes in the fear conditioning task in female C57BL/6J mice. We also tested whether Pitolisant reverses memory deficits induced by the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801). Our results indicate that post-training systemic injections of Pitolisant facilitated consolidation of contextual fear memory and reversed amnesia induced by an i.p. injection of 0.12 mg/kg dizocilpine. In addition, none of the doses of Pitolisant we have tested after reactivation (reexposure to the context in which training took place 48 h earlier) affected reconsolidation, whereas dizocilpine disrupted it. However, Pitolisant was able to reverse the deficit in reconsolidation induced by 0.12 mg/kg dizocilpine. The present results are the first demonstration that Pitolisant is effective in improving consolidation processes in the fear condition task and add further evidence to its potential for treating cognitive disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailDopamine, motivation, and the evolutionary significance of gambling-like behaviour
Anselme, Patrick ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 256(1), 1-4

If given a choice between certain and uncertain rewards, animals tend to prefer the uncertain option, even when the net gain is suboptimal. Animals are also more responsive to reward-related cues in ... [more ▼]

If given a choice between certain and uncertain rewards, animals tend to prefer the uncertain option, even when the net gain is suboptimal. Animals are also more responsive to reward-related cues in uncertain situations. This well-documented phenomenon in many animal species is in opposition to the basic principles of reinforcement as well as the optimal foraging theory, which suggest that animals will prefer the option associated with the highest reward rate. How does the brain code the attractiveness of unreliable/poor reward sources? And how can we interpret this evidence from an adaptive point of view? I argue that unpredictability and deprivation – whether physiological or psychological – enhance motivation to seek valuable stimuli for the same reason: compensating the difficulty an organism has to predict significant objects and events in the environment. [less ▲]

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See detailReward uncertainty enhances incentive salience attribution as sign-tracking
Anselme, Patrick ULg; Robinson, Mike J.F.; Berridge, Kent C.

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 238(1), 53-61

Conditioned stimuli (CSs) come to act as motivational magnets following repeated association with unconditioned stimuli (UCSs) such as sucrose rewards. By traditional views, the more reliably predictive a ... [more ▼]

Conditioned stimuli (CSs) come to act as motivational magnets following repeated association with unconditioned stimuli (UCSs) such as sucrose rewards. By traditional views, the more reliably predictive a Pavlovian CS-UCS association, the more the CS becomes attractive. However, in some cases, less predictability might equal more motivation. Here we examined the effect of introducing uncertainty in CS-UCS association on CS strength as an attractive motivation magnet. In the present study, Experiment 1 assessed the effects of Pavlovian predictability versus uncertainty about reward probability and/or reward magnitude on the acquisition and expression of sign-tracking (ST) and goal-tracking (GT) responses in an autoshaping procedure. Results suggested that uncertainty produced strongest incentive salience expressed as sign-tracking. Experiment 2 examined whether a within-individual temporal shift from certainty to uncertainty conditions could produce a stronger CS motivational magnet when uncertainty began, and found that sign-tracking still increased after the shift. Overall, our results support earlier reports that ST responses become more pronounced in the presence of uncertainty regarding CS-UCS associations, especially when uncertainty combines both probability and magnitude. These results suggest that Pavlovian uncertainty, although diluting predictability, is still able to enhance the incentive motivational power of particular CSs. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavior in the open field predicts the number of KCl-induced cortical spreading depressions in rats.
Bogdanov, Volodymyr Borysovych; Bogdanova, Olena Viktorivna; Koulchitsky, Stanislav ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2013), 236(1), 90-3

Anxiety disorders are known to be comorbid with migraine, and cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. To search for possible correlations between susceptibility ... [more ▼]

Anxiety disorders are known to be comorbid with migraine, and cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. To search for possible correlations between susceptibility to CSD and anxiety we used the open field test in male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically treated with the preventive anti-migraine drugs valproate or riboflavin. Animals avoiding the central area of the open field chamber and those with less exploratory activity (i.e. rearing) were considered more anxious. After 4 weeks of treatment CSDs were elicited by application of 1M KCl over the occipital cortex and the number of CSDs occurring over a 2h period was compared to the previously assessed open field behavior. Higher anxiety-like behavior was significantly correlated with a higher frequency of KCl-induced CSDs. In saline-treated animals, fewer rearings were found in animals with more frequent CSDs (R=-1.00). The duration of ambulatory episodes in the open field center correlated negatively with number of CSDs in the valproate group (R=-0.83; p<0.005) and in riboflavin treated group (R=-0.69; p<0.05) as well as total time spent in the open field center in both groups (R=-0.75; p<0.05 and R=-0.58; p<0.1 respectively). These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are associated with susceptibility to CSD and might explain why it can be an aggravating factor in migraine with aura. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic ethanol exposure during adolescence alters the behavioral responsiveness to ethanol in adult mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2012), 229

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present ... [more ▼]

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present experiments was to characterize changes in the behavioral effects of ethanol in adult female Swiss mice after a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence, extending from postnatal day 28 to postnatal day 42. After a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence (daily injections of 0, 2.5 or 4 g/kg ethanol for 14 consecutive days), adult mice were tested at postnatal day 63. The locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol, together with ethanol sensitization were tested in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the sedative effects of ethanol were assessed with the loss of righting reflex procedure. Finally, in experiment 3, the anxiolytic effects of ethanol were tested with the light/dark box test. Adult mice chronically exposed to ethanol during adolescence showed a lower basal locomotor activity, but higher locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol than non-exposed mice. Additionally, these adult mice developed higher rates of ethanol sensitization after chronic re-exposure to ethanol in adulthood. Adult mice exposed to ethanol during adolescence also had a stronger tolerance to the sedative effects of high ethanol doses, although they showed no evidence of changes in the anxiolytic effects of ethanol. These results are in agreement with the thesis that chronic alcohol consumption during adolescence, especially in high amounts, increases the risk of later alcohol-related disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailLoss in risk-taking: Absence of optimal gain or reduction in one’s own resources?
Anselme, Patrick ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2012), 229(2), 443-446

Determining how living beings react to tasks that reflect realistic situations of risk has given rise to a vast literature. However, I argue that the methodologies traditionally used to test humans and ... [more ▼]

Determining how living beings react to tasks that reflect realistic situations of risk has given rise to a vast literature. However, I argue that the methodologies traditionally used to test humans and nonhumans relative to risk often fail to achieve their goal. When risk is modelled in laboratory, potential decision cost (or potential loss) typically denotes an absence of optimal gain. In contrast, when risk occurs in real-life situations, potential loss denotes the reduction in an individual’s limited resources – whether energetic, social, financial, etc. This conceptual difference about the nature of risk may have important implications for the understanding of the parameters that control risk-taking behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailDo excitatory and inhibitory conditioning processes underlie psychomotor sensitization to amphetamine? An analysis using simple and multiple regressions
Brabant, Christian ULg; Tambour, Sophie; Quertemont, Etienne ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2011), 221

Excitatory or inhibitory conditioning processes have been proposed to account for the context-dependent establishment of amphetamine psychomotor sensitization in rodents. The purpose of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Excitatory or inhibitory conditioning processes have been proposed to account for the context-dependent establishment of amphetamine psychomotor sensitization in rodents. The purpose of this study was to test the predictions of these theories in mice. We first assessed the consequence of the extinction of post-sensitization conditioned activity (CR) on the ulterior expression of sensitization. We also assessed the relations between several measures of sensitization and conditioned hyperactivity revealed on a saline challenge using simple and multiple regression analyses. Context-dependent sensitization was induced via 7 amphetamine injections in the test context given alternately with 7 saline injections in another context in paired mice, unpaired mice receiving the converse pretreatment. Context-dependent sensitization (drug challenge) and the CR (saline challenge) were revealed subsequently. After CR extinction (over 7 every-other-day repetition of the saline challenge), mice were tested again for context-dependent sensitization. Against the excitatory conditioning model, CR extinction spared context-dependent sensitization in paired mice, and regression analyses revealed no significant correlations between the size of the CR and several measures of sensitization. In apparent agreement with the inhibitory conditioning model, unpaired mice expressed higher levels of sensitization in the test context after extinction than before. However, regression analyses did not indicate that activity on the saline challenge was related to measures of sensitization in unpaired mice. Therefore, the present results support neither the excitatory nor the inhibitory conditioning models of context-dependent sensitization, but remain compatible with theories proposing that other inhibitory mechanisms modulate sensitization. [less ▲]

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See detailThe uncertainty processing theory of motivation
Anselme, Patrick ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2010), 208(2), 291-310

Most theories describe motivation using basic terminology (drive, ‘wanting’, goal, pleasure, etc.) that fails to inform well about the psychological mechanisms controlling its expression. This leads to a ... [more ▼]

Most theories describe motivation using basic terminology (drive, ‘wanting’, goal, pleasure, etc.) that fails to inform well about the psychological mechanisms controlling its expression. This leads to a conception of motivation as a mere psychological state ‘emerging’ from neurophysiological substrates. However, the involvement of motivation in a large number of behavioural parameters (triggering, intensity, duration, and directedness) and cognitive abilities (learning, memory, decision, etc.) suggest that it should be viewed as an information processing system. The Uncertainty Processing Theory (UPT) presented here suggests that motivation is the set of cognitive processes allowing organisms to extract information from the environment by reducing uncertainty about the occurrence of psychologically significant events. This processing of information is shown to naturally result in the highlighting of specific stimuli. The UPT attempts to solve three major problems: (i) how motivations can affect behaviour and cognition so widely, (ii) how motivational specificity for objects and events can result from nonspecific neuropharmacological causal factors (such as mesolimbic dopamine), and (iii) how motivational interactions can be conceived in psychological terms, irrespective of their biological correlates. The UPT is in keeping with the conceptual tradition of the incentive salience hypothesis while trying to overcome the shortcomings inherent to this view. [less ▲]

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See detailThe main and accessory olfactory systems interact in the control of mate recognition and sexual behavior
Keller, M.; Baum, M. J.; Brock, Olivier ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2009)

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See detailThe usefulness of operant conditioning procedures to assess long-lasting deficits following transient focal ischemia in mice.
Ferrara, André ULg; El Bejaoui, Sophie; Seyen, Sandrine ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2009), 205(2), 525-34

In this study, we examined a number of short and long-term sensorimotor, behavioural and cognitive consequences of an experimental ischemia induced by a 60-min right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO ... [more ▼]

In this study, we examined a number of short and long-term sensorimotor, behavioural and cognitive consequences of an experimental ischemia induced by a 60-min right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in 129S2 mice. During 14 days after surgery, a classical sensorimotor assessment was conducted using hanging wire test, negative geotaxis test, grip strength test, accelerated rotarod test and locomotor activity-meter. In order to provide a technique for the assessment of more resistant consequences of ischemia on fine psychomotor control, the peak procedure (a modified version of the operant fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement) was used. This procedure also helped to objectify temporal perception in mice five weeks following surgery. On several sensorimotor tests, ischemic mice showed some degree of impairment which rapidly tended to improve after stroke, a profile of results substantially consistent with previous studies. Five weeks post-surgery, ischemic mice tested with the peak procedure exhibited a moderate but yet significant temporal regulation impairment along with a reduced response rate compared to control mice. The present results suggest that the peak procedure and other derived operant schedules of reinforcement may provide useful and sensitive tools for the long-term assessment of both behavioural and cognitive aspects of the consequences of an experimental ischemia. [less ▲]

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See detailSite-specific effects of anosmia and cloacal gland anesthesia on Fos expression induced in male quail brain by sexual behavior.
Taziaux, Mélanie ULg; Keller, Matthieu; Ball, Gregory F et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2008), 194(1), 52-65

In rats, expression of the immediate early gene, c-fos observed in the brain following male copulatory behavior relates mostly to the detection of olfactory information originating from the female and to ... [more ▼]

In rats, expression of the immediate early gene, c-fos observed in the brain following male copulatory behavior relates mostly to the detection of olfactory information originating from the female and to somatosensory feedback from the penis. However, quail, like most birds, are generally considered to have a relatively poorly developed sense of smell. Furthermore, quail have no intromittent organ (e.g., penis). It is therefore intriguing that expression of male copulatory behavior induces in quail and rats a similar pattern of c-fos expression in the medial preoptic area (mPOA), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTM) and parts of the amygdala. We analyzed here by immunocytochemistry Fos expression in the mPOA/BSTM/amygdala of male quail that had been allowed to copulate with a female during standardized tests. Before these tests, some of the males had either their nostrils plugged, or their cloacal area anesthetized, or both. A control group was not exposed to females. These manipulations did not affect frequencies of male sexual behavior and all birds exposed to a female copulated normally. In the mPOA, the increased Fos expression induced by copulation was not affected by the cloacal gland anesthesia but was markedly reduced in subjects deprived of olfactory input. Both manipulations affected copulation-induced Fos expression in the BSTM. No change in Fos expression was observed in the amygdala. Thus immediate early gene expression in the mPOA and BSTM of quail is modulated at least in part by olfactory cues and/or somatosensory stimuli originating from the cloacal gland. Future work should specify the nature of these stimuli and their function in the expression of avian male sexual behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailThe underestimated role of olfaction in avian reproduction?
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Taziaux, Mélanie ULg

in Behavioural Brain Research (2008)

Until the second half of the 20th century, it was broadly accepted that most birds are microsmatic if not anosmic and unable to detect and use olfactory information. Exceptions were eventually conceded ... [more ▼]

Until the second half of the 20th century, it was broadly accepted that most birds are microsmatic if not anosmic and unable to detect and use olfactory information. Exceptions were eventually conceded for species like procellariiforms, vultures or kiwis that detect their food at least in part based on olfactory signals. During the past 20-30 years, many publications have appeared indicating that this view is definitely erroneous. We briefly review here anatomical, electrophysiological and behavioral data demonstrating that birds in general possess a functional olfactory system and are able to use olfactory information in a variety of ethological contexts, including reproduction. Recent work also indicates that brain activation induced by sexual interactions with a female is significantly affected by olfactory deprivation in Japanese quail. Brain activation was measured via immunocytochemical detection of the protein product of the immediate early gene c-fos. Changes observed concerned two brain areas that play a key role in the control of male sexual behavior, the medial preoptic nucleus and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis therefore suggesting a potential role of olfaction in the control of reproduction. The widespread idea that birds are anosmic or microsmatic is thus not supported by the available experimental data and presumably originates in our anthropomorphic view that leads us to think that birds do not smell because they have a rigid beak and nostrils and do not obviously sniff. Experimental analysis of this phenomenon is thus warranted and should lead to a significant change in our understanding of avian biology. [less ▲]

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See detailMale aromatase knockout mice acquire a conditioned place preference for cocaine but not for contact with an estrous female
Pierman, S.; Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Douhard, Quentin ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2006), 174(1), 64-69

We have previously shown that male mice carrying a targeted mutation in the Cyp19 gene which encodes the aromatase enzyme (aromatase knockout or ArKO), showed a reduced interest to investigate volatile ... [more ▼]

We have previously shown that male mice carrying a targeted mutation in the Cyp19 gene which encodes the aromatase enzyme (aromatase knockout or ArKO), showed a reduced interest to investigate volatile odors from conspecifics in a Y-maze. We asked here whether the incentive value of reproductively relevant odors is reduced in ArKO males by comparing the ability of male wild-type (WT) and ArKO mice to learn a conditioned place preference using exposure to reproductively relevant odors as incentive stimuli. When the presence of an anesthetized estrous female or soiled bedding from estrous females was used as incentive stimuli, only WT and not male ArKO mice showed conditioned place preference suggesting that the reward value of these stimuli is reduced in ArKO males. However, ArKO males showed conditioned place preference when cocaine was used as incentive stimulus, indicating that ArKO males are able to learn the conditioned place preference procedure. These results thus further confirm the important role of estradiol in sexually related behavioral responses in male mice. [less ▲]

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See detailMice lacking the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor-1 exhibit an atypical psychomotor susceptibility to cocaine and no conditioned cocaine response
Tyhon, Alain ULg; Adamantidis, Antoine ULg; Foidart, Agnès ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2006), 173(1), 94-103

The present study aimed at characterizing the acute and intermittent psychomotor responsiveness to cocaine in mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor, which is thought to modulate the mesocorticolimbic sytem ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed at characterizing the acute and intermittent psychomotor responsiveness to cocaine in mice lacking the MCHR1 receptor, which is thought to modulate the mesocorticolimbic sytem functioning [Smith DG, Tzavara ET, Shaw J, Luecke S, Wade M, Davis R, et al. Mesolimbic dopamine super-sensitivity in melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor deficient mice. J Neurosci 2005;25:914-22]. On a first free-drug session, MCHR1-deficient mice exhibited significantly higher levels of locomotor activity elicited by the novelty of the test chambers than their wild-type counterparts. On the following day session, a first injection of 6 or 12mg/kg cocaine induced comparable dose-related psychomotor activations in both genotypes, without significant difference in the relative increase in locomotion. Over the following eight once-daily test sessions, the slight psychomotor increase induced by 6mg/kg was equivalent in both genotypes and constant over the sessions. At 12mg/kg, cocaine induced a clear-cut incremental responsiveness to cocaine in both genotypes on the three first sessions; on the following sessions, only the wild-types displayed an incremental responsiveness until the last session, a sensitized effect that was confirmed for the wild-types but not for the knockouts on a subsequent sensitization test (cocaine challenge). Finally, the knockouts did not exhibit any sign of cocaine-conditioning (saline challenge), contrarily to the wild-types. It is speculated that MCHR1 may contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms of conditioned cocaine-induced psychomotor effects, possibly to those underpinning sensitization, and to a lesser extent to those sub-serving acute pharmacological cocaine action. [less ▲]

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