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See detailThe Poetics of (In)visibility: A Stylistic Analysis of Caryl Phillips's Foreigners: Three English Lives
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2017), 48(3-4), 159-186

Caryl Phillips’s multi-voiced texts have often been studied through the lens of Bakhtinian polyphony. In this essay, I focus on the volume of fictionalized biographies Foreigners: Three English Lives ... [more ▼]

Caryl Phillips’s multi-voiced texts have often been studied through the lens of Bakhtinian polyphony. In this essay, I focus on the volume of fictionalized biographies Foreigners: Three English Lives (2007) to demonstrate that the polyphonic nature of Phillips’s work resides not only in the structural confrontation of characters’ and narrators’ voices but also in the inscription of the writer’s own subjectivity within these individual discourses. Borrowing methods from the discipline of stylistics, I first focus on the use of adjectives and modality in the opening section of Foreigners, “Dr. Johnson’s Watch,” to establish how the first-person narrator’s gradual transition from tentativeness to self-confidence constitutes a way for the implied author, on the one hand, to expose the thwarted logic of the colonially-tinted discourse of his eighteenth-century narrator and, on the other, to offer larger reflections on the process of ideological encoding inherent in the writing of historiography. Such an investigation based on modality furthers allow me to challenge the critical consensus according to which the second section of the book, “Made in Wales,” is a straightforward factual account. Indeed, I suggest that the story of the rise and fall of mixed-race boxer Randolph Turpin is in fact a highly polyphonic narrative featuring increasingly marked clashes in modality and point of view. These, I argue, may draw attention precisely to the problematic construction of historiographical discourse deceptively made to appear so commonsense by the narrator of “Dr. Johnson’s Watch.” [less ▲]

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See detailCaryl Phillips’s The Lost Child: A Story of Loss and Connection
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; O'Callaghan, Evelyn

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2017), 48(3&4), 229-247

Through a reading of Caryl Phillips’ most recent novel, The Lost Child (2015), this article examines a paradox at the heart of Phillips’ work: the tension between the ruptures and continuities brought ... [more ▼]

Through a reading of Caryl Phillips’ most recent novel, The Lost Child (2015), this article examines a paradox at the heart of Phillips’ work: the tension between the ruptures and continuities brought about by the historical encounter of north and south (specifically, eighteenth-century northern Britain and the Caribbean). The novel focuses on the lot of the lost children who were born in the wake of such a fateful meeting and whose narratives are often missing from the literary and historical records even as their ghostly traces haunt today’s British society and indeed the British literary canon. Yet, as this essay demonstrates, the family disruptions and sense of loss, a legacy of slavery that mars the lives of the characters, are compensated at the fictional level by a form of literary parenthood. The novel relies on a fruitful intertextual conversation with other novels that, like The Lost Child, invest in the narrative reclamation of absent stories, the unvoiced accounts of orphans and lost, stolen, or denied children of the Empire. These texts include Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (1847) as well as Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) and some of Phillips’ earlier works, notably Cambridge (1991). [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction: Thinking Caryl Phillips out of the box
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2017), 48(3&4), 1-11

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See detailSpecial issue on Caryl Phillips
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2017), 48(3&4), 1-247

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See detailNothing, Not a Scrap of Identity: Janet Frame's Vision of Self and Knowledge in A State of Siege
Gabrielle, Cindy ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2012), 42(3), 279-299

Still largely unexplored, Janet Frame’s deep interest in eastern philosophies provides an illuminating point of entry into her sixth novel, A State of Siege. Questing for a New View, an amateur-painter ... [more ▼]

Still largely unexplored, Janet Frame’s deep interest in eastern philosophies provides an illuminating point of entry into her sixth novel, A State of Siege. Questing for a New View, an amateur-painter constantly harps back to the kind of fossilized aesthetic that draws a clear line between the perceiver and the perceived. However, step by step, trial after trial, the main protagonist is made to discard her cherished sense of apartness to embrace instead a state of utter non-distinction. In contrast to most commentators of the novel, my aim in this essay is to suggest that, in Frame as in Buddhism, nothingness of identity is not meant to translate into something – be it the solid shape of memory or any ontology beyond dissolution – for, unless the knower retains “nothing, not even a scrap of identity” from what s/he is trying to perceive, true knowledge, unadulterated memories and an unmediated apprehension of the real are seen to be altogether impossible. [less ▲]

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See detailA Fictional and Cultural Labyrinth: Caryl Phillips's The Nature of Blood
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2001), 32(1), 185-195

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See detail“Cross-Cultural Dialogues with Greek Classics: Walcott’s The Odyssey and Soyinka’s The Bacchae of Euripides.”
Bada, Valérie ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (2000)

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See detailEscape into Innocence: Ian McEwan and the Nightmare of History
Delrez, Marc ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (1995), 26(2), 7-23

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See detailInimitable Painting': New Developments in Wilson Harris's Latest Fiction
Maes-Jelinek, Hena ULiege

in Ariel : A Review of International English Literature (1977), 8(3), 63-80

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