References of "Applied Cognitive Psychology"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDepicting the Missing: Prospective and Retrospective Person Memory for Age Progressed Photographs
Lampinen, James Michael; Miller, Justin T; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2012), 26(2), 197-173

One approach that has been used to help recover missing children is forensic age progression. In forensic age progression, outdated photographs of missing children are aged to provide an estimate of the ... [more ▼]

One approach that has been used to help recover missing children is forensic age progression. In forensic age progression, outdated photographs of missing children are aged to provide an estimate of the current appearance of the child. We examined the effectiveness of age progressed image in the context of both prospective person memory and retrospective person memory. Memory for outdated pictures and age progressed pictures did not significantly differ. The results failed to demonstrate an advantage for age progressed pictures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrequency, characteristics, and functions of future-oriented thoughts in daily life
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Renaud, Olivier; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2011), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories and imagined events in sub-clinical obsessive-compulsive checkers
Zermatten, Ariane; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg et al

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2008), 22(1), 113-125

Phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories and imagined experiences were examined in checking- and non-checking-prone individuals. Participants were asked to retrieve a positive, a negative ... [more ▼]

Phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories and imagined experiences were examined in checking- and non-checking-prone individuals. Participants were asked to retrieve a positive, a negative and a neutral memory, and to imagine a positive, a negative and a neutral experience. They were then requested to evaluate each event according to characteristics such as sensory and contextual details. The main results revealed that non-checking-prone participants reported more general vividness than checking-prone individuals for real events. In addition, non-checking-prone individuals reported more visual details and vividness for real than imagined experiences, while no difference between real and imagined events was found for checking-prone participants. These results suggest that checking-prone participants report poor memories of real events, which could in turn explain their difficulties distinguishing between real and imagined events. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories for positive, negative, and neutral events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Comblain, Christine; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2003), 17(3), 281-294

We investigated memory qualifies for positive, negative, and neutral autobiographical events. Participants recalled two personal experiences of each type and then rated their memories on several ... [more ▼]

We investigated memory qualifies for positive, negative, and neutral autobiographical events. Participants recalled two personal experiences of each type and then rated their memories on several characteristics (e.g. sensorial and contextual details). They also reported whether they 'see' the events in their memories from their own perspective ('field' memories) or whether they 'see' the self engaged in the event as an observer would ('observer' memories). Positive memories contained more sensorial (visual, smell, taste) and contextual (location, time) details than both negative and neutral events, whereas negative and neutral memories did not differ on most dimensions. Positive and negative events were more often recollected with a field perspective than neutral events. Finally, participants were classified in four groups according to the repressive coping style framework. Emotional memories of repressors were not less detailed than those of the other groups. Copyright (C) 2002 John Wiley Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDaily-life difficulties in person recognition reported by young and elderly subjects
Schweich, M.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg et al

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (1992), 6

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)