References of "Angiogenesis"
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See detailMiR-205 is downregulated in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and impairs TGF-beta signaling pathways in endothelial cells.
Tabruyn, Sebastien P.; Hansen, Sylvain ULg; Ojeda-Fernandez, Maria-Luisa et al

in Angiogenesis (2013)

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by arteriovenous malformations and hemorrhages. This vascular disease results mainly from mutations in 2 genes ... [more ▼]

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by arteriovenous malformations and hemorrhages. This vascular disease results mainly from mutations in 2 genes involved in the TGF-beta pathway (ENG and ALK1) that are exclusively expressed by endothelial cells. The present study identified miR-27a and miR-205 as two circulating miRNAs differentially expressed in HHT patients. The plasma levels of miR-27a are elevated while those of miR-205 are reduced in both HHT1 and HHT2 patients compared to healthy controls. The role of miR-205 in endothelial cells was further investigated. Our data indicates that miR-205 expression displaces the TGF-beta balance towards the anti-angiogenic side by targeting Smad1 and Smad4. In line, overexpression of miR-205 in endothelial cells reduces proliferation, migration and tube formation while its inhibition shows opposite effects. This study not only suggests that detection of circulating miRNA (miR-27a and miR-205) could help for the screening of HHT patients but also provides a functional link between the deregulated expression of miR-205 and the HHT phenotype. [less ▲]

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See detailNew prospects in the roles of the C-terminal domains of VEGF-A and their cooperation for ligand binding, cellular signaling and vessels formation.
Delcombel, Romain ULg; Janssen, Lauriane ULg; Vassy, Roger et al

in Angiogenesis (2013), 16(2), 353-71

VEGF-A is a crucial growth factor for blood vessel homeostasis and pathological angiogenesis. Due to alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, VEGF-A is produced under several isoforms characterized by the ... [more ▼]

VEGF-A is a crucial growth factor for blood vessel homeostasis and pathological angiogenesis. Due to alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA, VEGF-A is produced under several isoforms characterized by the combination of their C-terminal domains, which determines their respective structure, availability and affinity for co-receptors. As controversies still exist about the specific roles of these exon-encoded domains, we systematically compared the properties of eight natural and artificial variants containing the domains encoded by exons 1-4 and various combinations of the domains encoded by exons 5, 7 and 8a or 8b. All the variants (VEGF(111)a, VEGF(111)b, VEGF(121)a, VEGF(121)b, VEGF(155)a, VEGF(155)b, VEGF(165)a, VEGF(165)b) have a similar affinity for VEGF-R2, as determined by Surface plasmon resonance analyses. They strongly differ however in terms of binding to neuropilin-1 and heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Data indicate that the 6 amino acids encoded by exon 8a must be present and cooperate with those of exons 5 or 7 for efficient binding, which was confirmed in cell culture models. We further showed that VEGF(165)b has inhibitory effects in vitro, as previously reported, but that the shortest VEGF variant possessing also the 6 amino acids encoded by exon 8b (VEGF(111)b) is remarkably proangiogenic, demonstrating the critical importance of domain interactions for defining the VEGF properties. The number, size and localization of newly formed blood vessels in a model of tumour angiogenesis strongly depend also on the C-terminal domain composition, suggesting that association of several VEGF isoforms may be more efficient for treating ischemic diseases than the use of any single variant. [less ▲]

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See detailThe angiogenesis suppressor gene AKAP12 is under the epigenetic control of HDAC7 in endothelial cells.
Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Mottet, Denis ULg; Matheus, Nicolas ULg et al

in Angiogenesis (2012)

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of 18 enzymes that deacetylate lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins and to a large extent govern the process of angiogenesis. Previous studies ... [more ▼]

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of 18 enzymes that deacetylate lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins and to a large extent govern the process of angiogenesis. Previous studies have shown that specific inhibition of HDAC7 blocks angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood and hence preclude any meaningful development of suitable therapeutic modalities. The goal of the present study was to further the understanding of HDAC7 epigenetic control of angiogenesis in human endothelial cells using the proteomic approach. The underlying problem was approached through siRNA-mediated gene-expression silencing of HDAC7 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). To this end, HUVEC proteins were extracted and proteomically analyzed. The emphasis was placed on up-regulated proteins, as these may represent potential direct epigenetic targets of HDAC7. Among several proteins, A-kinase anchor protein 12 (AKAP12) was the most reproducibly up-regulated protein following HDAC7 depletion. This overexpression of AKAP12 was responsible for the inhibition of migration and tube formation in HDAC7-depleted HUVEC. Mechanistically, H3 histones associated with AKAP12 promoter were acetylated following the removal of HDAC7, leading to an increase in its mRNA and protein levels. AKAP12 is responsible for protein kinase C mediated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Phosphorylated STAT3 increasingly binds to the chromatin and AKAP12 promoter and is necessary for maintaining the elevated levels of AKAP12 following HDAC7 knockdown. We demonstrated for the first time that AKAP12 tumor/angiogenesis suppressor gene is an epigenetic target of HDAC7, whose elevated levels lead to a negative regulation of HUVEC migration and inhibit formation of tube-like structures. [less ▲]

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See detailNF-kappa B: a new player in angiostatic therapy.
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Griffioen, Arjan W

in Angiogenesis (2008), 11(1), 101-6

Angiogenesis is considered a promising target in the treatment of cancer. Most of the angiogenesis inhibitors in late-stage clinical testing or approved for the treatment of cancer act indirectly on ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis is considered a promising target in the treatment of cancer. Most of the angiogenesis inhibitors in late-stage clinical testing or approved for the treatment of cancer act indirectly on endothelial cells. They either neutralize angiogenic growth factors from the circulation or block the signaling pathways activated by these growth factors. Another group of angiogenesis inhibitors are the direct angiostatic compounds. These agents have a direct effect on the endothelium, affecting cellular regulatory pathways, independently of the tumor cells. The reason that this category of agents is lagging behind regarding their translation to the clinic may be the lack of sufficient knowledge on the mechanism of action of these compounds. The transcription factor NF-kappaB has been recently connected with multiple aspects of angiogenesis. In addition, several recent studies report that angiogenesis inhibition is associated to NF-kappaB activation. This is of special interest since in tumor cells NF-kappaB activation has been associated to inhibition of apoptosis and currently novel treatment strategies are being developed based on inhibition of NF-kappaB. The paradigm that systemic NF-kappaB inhibition can serve as an anti-cancer strategy, therefore, might need to be re-evaluated. Based on recent data, it might be speculated that NF-kappaB activation, when performed specifically in endothelial cells, could be an efficient strategy for the treatment of cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of ADAMTS-2, a metalloproteinase containing a disintegrin domain and thrombospondin type I repeats, during angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo
Dubail, Johanne ULg; Kesteloot, Frédéric ULg; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Angiogenesis (2004), 7(2), 172

Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is a key step during the development of various pathologies, including cancer. Enzymes of the ADAMTS family are closely related to MMPs and ADAMs. They ... [more ▼]

Formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is a key step during the development of various pathologies, including cancer. Enzymes of the ADAMTS family are closely related to MMPs and ADAMs. They further contain specific domains, such as the ‘‘Thrombospondin type I’’ (TSP1) repeats, that are able to strongly repress angiogenesis, as described for thrombospondin-1 and -2, and for ADAMTS-1 and -8. The primary function of ADAMTS-2 is to process collagen type I, II and III precursors into mature molecules by excising the aminopropeptide. We further hypothesized that it could modulate angiogenesis through its TSP1 repeats. This hypothesis was investigated using different in vitro experimental models of angiogenesis. Recombinant ADAMTS-2 induced morphological changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC), and significantly reduced their proliferation, attachment and spreading. Similar effects were observed when using inactive ADAMTS-2 mutated at the Zn2+-binding catalytic site. ADAMTS-2 did not alter the initial steps of formation of capillary-like structures by HUVEC in vitro. However, these structures appeared much less stable and were more rapidly disrupted in presence of ADAMTS-2 than in control conditions. ADAMTS-2 was also tested in an ex vivo angiogenesis model using aortic rings from rats and mice, wild type or KO for ADAMTS-2. Outgrowth of capillaries was slightly increased from aortas of ADAMTS-2 KO mice (TS2-/-) as compared to aortas from control animals (TS2+/+), while addition of full size recombinant ADAMTS-2 reduced the formation of capillary structures from rat aortas, suggesting its anti-angiogenic activity. Choroidal neovascularization induced in TS2+/+ or TS2-/- mice by LASER burns was used as in vivo model to confirm the in vitro and ex vivo results. Several genes involved in the healing and angiogenesis processes (fibrillar collagens, VEGF, TGF-beta and CTGF) were not differently regulated in TS2+/+ and TS2-/- mice at 5 days. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved Quantification of Angiogenesis in the Rat Aortic Ring Assay
Blacher, Silvia ULg; Devy, L.; Burbridge, M. F. et al

in Angiogenesis (2001), 4(2), 133-42

In vitro angiogenesis assays are essential for the identification of potential angiogenic agents and screening for pharmacological inhibitors. Among these assays, the rat aortic ring model developed by ... [more ▼]

In vitro angiogenesis assays are essential for the identification of potential angiogenic agents and screening for pharmacological inhibitors. Among these assays, the rat aortic ring model developed by Nicosia bridges the gap between in vivo and in vitro models. The quantification of angiogenesis on this system must be applicable to characterise vascular networks of various states of complexity. We present here an improved computer-assisted image analysis which allows: (1) the determination of the aortic ring area and its factor shape; (2) the number of microvessels, the total number of branchings, the maximal microvessel length and the microvessel distribution; (3) the total number of isolated fibroblast-like cells and their distribution. We show that this method is suitable to quantify spontaneous angiogenesis as well as to analyse a complex microvascular network induced by various concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In addition, by evaluating a new parameter, the fibroblast-like cell distribution, our results show that: (1) during spontaneous angiogenic response, maximal fibroblast-like cell migration delimits microvascular outgrowth; and (2) the known angiogenic inhibitor Batimastat prevents endothelial cell sprouting without completely blocking fibroblast-like cell migration. Finally, this new method of quantification is of great interest to better understand angiogenesis and to test pro- or anti-angiogenic agents. [less ▲]

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See detailGalectin-1 Expression in Prostate Tumor-Associated Capillary Endothelial Cells Is Increased by Prostate Carcinoma Cells and Modulates Heterotypic Cell-Cell Adhesion
Clausse, Nathalie; van den Brule, Frédéric; Waltregny, David ULg et al

in Angiogenesis (1999), 3(4), 317-25

Besides providing tumors with nutrients, newly formed capillaries constitute a potential escape route for tumor cells favoring metastatic dissemination, and constitute an access for the anti-tumoral host ... [more ▼]

Besides providing tumors with nutrients, newly formed capillaries constitute a potential escape route for tumor cells favoring metastatic dissemination, and constitute an access for the anti-tumoral host immune cells. Galectin-1, a soluble human lectin, is involved in numerous biological functions including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In addition, galectin-1 is able to induce apoptosis of activated T-lymphocytes. In this study, we have examined galectin-1 expression in capillaries associated to the carcinoma cells or present in the remote non-tumoral stroma of 100 human prostate carcinoma samples by immunoperoxidase staining. Galectin-1 was expressed by endothelial cells from capillaries infiltrating the tumor tissue in 64% (64/100) of the cases. On the contrary, endothelial cells in the adjacent non-tumoral stroma expressed galectin-1 in very few cases (7/100). Increased frequency of galectin-1-positive capillaries in the tumor-associated compared to the tumor-free areas was observed in 63% of the cases. This striking contrast led us to set up an in vitro model to test whether tumor cells could induce galectin-1 expression by endothelial cells. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with conditioned media from PC-3 or DU 145 prostate carcinoma cells led to a significant increase of galectin-1 protein expression (+32.97% and 37.91% P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). PC-3 conditioned medium also induced increased adhesion values of PC-3 cells to the endothelial cells (53.4 +/- 4.7 vs. 38.5 +/- 3.5 after 30 min; 66.6 +/- 7.8 vs. 46.2 +/- 6.4 after 60 min). An anti-galectin-1 antiserum abolished this modulation, and recombinant galectin-1 also induced increased adhesion values in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was specific as no such modulations were observed using normal lymphocytes instead of PC-3 cells. Preferential galectin-1 expression in the endothelial cells close to the cancer cells could provide these latter with increased abilities to interact with the endothelial cells as well as a defense against the host immune system. [less ▲]

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